Moving a unisaw

Melinapex

Mark
Corporate Member
How to move a unisaw? I have done some reading and it seems like the way to do this is to flip it upside down in the back of my pickup. If I do that - do I still need to worry about damaging the Trunion- and if so, how can I avoid that? I have never been inside one of these saws so am a little unsure of myself..... TIA
 

HMH

Heath Hendrick
Senior User
Hi Mel - cabinet saws are pretty easy, but also heavy. Flipping it upside down in the bed of a pickup would be an ok way to transport it, but you’re going to have to manhandle several hundred pounds. A MUCH easier way would be to bring a small trailer, even if you have to rent one. A much shorter to the ground lift - if it’s got a ramp gate, much easier. I’ve moved several over the years, and a trailer w/ a ramp, coupled w/ a dolly and some cribbing, makes it an easy 1-man task, (assuming you’re moving it from a garage/ ground floor location). Basements, etc are another story!
 

Dee2

Board of Directors, Vice President
Gene
Staff member
Corporate Member
A couple of 2x6s from tailgate to ground. Tilt/lean the saw onto the 2X6s and (you may need help) lift the 2X6s and slide them into the truck. Stand the saw up if you prefer. Pulling the motor out first makes this a little easier. It's all about leverage
 

Dee2

Board of Directors, Vice President
Gene
Staff member
Corporate Member
Pull the motor and remove the top. Now it's a one man job. You will want to tune it up in the end anyway.
Exactly how I did it by myself. Note the motor is heavy and awkward to move out of the cabinet, but doable.
 

drw

Donn
Corporate Member
Mark, I have a busy week this week and weekend, but if you need any help next week call me.

Donn
 

Warped Woodwerks

.
Senior User
When I was moving houses, I used a 26' truck with a lift gate. Made moving my saw a piece of cake.

Not sure a 1-day truck rental would be worth your time, or the cost, but just an idea.
 

zdorsch

Zach
Corporate Member
Take off the top. It’s a bit more manageable and it’s only held on by 4 bolts. Pay attention to the shims that may be in between the top and the cabinet and put them back in the same place.

You still want weight off of the trunion, so I’d flip it upside down. I didn’t for my first Unisaw and have a broken trunion. Didn’t make the same mistake twice and had no issues with the second Unisaw.

Also, try to avoid lifting by the table when it’s still attached to the cabinet. I think that’s in one of the old manuals, but I’m not looking at it now.
 

Melinapex

Mark
Corporate Member
Thanks for all the experience and advise.... I do plan to remove the top and turn the cabinet upside down, but I still don't quite understand how that takes weight off the trunion.... seems like it would simply turn the weight in the opposite direction, but I will see if I can find some diagrams and wrap my head around this.... clearly I need to take more machines apart!
 

FredP

Fred
Corporate Member
No need to turn it upside down. With the top off its manageable to load. Right side up is its natural position. Put a strap or 2 on it and drive like ya stole it! :p
 

Dee2

Board of Directors, Vice President
Gene
Staff member
Corporate Member
With the motor out, the only weight on the trunions is the trunions.
 

Melinapex

Mark
Corporate Member
Thanks all, I am a little concerned about the weight of the motor vs my spindly arms, so was thinking of ways to avoid that if possible.... but I appreciate all the advice!
 

Dee2

Board of Directors, Vice President
Gene
Staff member
Corporate Member
A couple of smallish jacks/jackstands could be helpful or some selected cribbing for removing the motor. Taking it off is easier than putting it on. But then mine was 3 phase and I replaced it with a 4 hp single phase. Of course if you have a way to raise the cabinet up over the motor....:)

If you take the top off, you might be able to rig a support for the motor with some ratchet straps - I just don't remember.

If you leave the motor for loading and moving, the only thing that holds it in place is its own weight and the drive belts. Yes there is a pin that it swings on and the tilt is controlled by the trunnions. Be cautious if you tip the cabinet too far.
 
The thread is over a year old but still relevant to me so I'm posting here. I have a delta unisaw that I want to move from a storage unit to my home (about 60 mile trip). I've read already the weight of the saw is 575 lb. I have two questions:

1. Am I kidding myself that if the saw were in this portable stand (see pic), would it roll easily enough up my trailer's ramp gate (see pic)? would laying cardboard down on the ramp allow a smoother effort to get the saw on to the trailer?
2. Is this more than a one person job?

Thanks.
 

Attachments

  • saw-1.jpg
    saw-1.jpg
    2.9 MB · Views: 27
  • saw-2.jpg
    saw-2.jpg
    3.3 MB · Views: 28

Ricksmi

Rick
Corporate Member
The thread is over a year old but still relevant to me so I'm posting here. I have a delta unisaw that I want to move from a storage unit to my home (about 60 mile trip). I've read already the weight of the saw is 575 lb. I have two questions:

1. Am I kidding myself that if the saw were in this portable stand (see pic), would it roll easily enough up my trailer's ramp gate (see pic)? would laying cardboard down on the ramp allow a smoother effort to get the saw on to the trailer?
2. Is this more than a one person job?

Thanks.
I would not use cardboard but a sheet of plywood will make the job easier, that's how I loaded my SS onto my trailer and the only thing I removed from the saw was the fence. Since I had no one that could pop over when I needed to move the saw I used a come-a-long and had the saw in the tariler in less than 10 minutes.
 
I would not use cardboard but a sheet of plywood will make the job easier, that's how I loaded my SS onto my trailer and the only thing I removed from the saw was the fence. Since I had no one that could pop over when I needed to move the saw I used a come-a-long and had the saw in the tariler in less than 10 minutes.
Thanks for the reply. how about unloading? any challenge there ?
 

zdorsch

Zach
Corporate Member
Thanks for the reply. how about unloading? any challenge there ?
Yes unloading will be a challenge alone. I would use plywood instead of cardboard on your trailer, but those small wheels may still want to dig in.

I reiterate my recommendation to remove the top or at least provide blocking or support for the motor in some kind of way.
 

Melinapex

Mark
Corporate Member
The thread is over a year old but still relevant to me so I'm posting here. I have a delta unisaw that I want to move from a storage unit to my home (about 60 mile trip). I've read already the weight of the saw is 575 lb. I have two questions:

1. Am I kidding myself that if the saw were in this portable stand (see pic), would it roll easily enough up my trailer's ramp gate (see pic)? would laying cardboard down on the ramp allow a smoother effort to get the saw on to the trailer?
2. Is this more than a one person job?

Thanks.
I had one of those portable stands on my contractor saw- they are very nice on flat surfaces but are so low / small wheels and distance between the wheels was such that I had trouble moving it on anything other than a level surface. Any incline or decline was a challenge as it usually got stuck part way. Probably would work best if you remove the extension and just move the cabinet by itself. But I would bring some leverage tools just in case……
It was a two man job (thanks again Donn!) and we did remove the top, but left the motor in and supported it with some 2x lumber scraps.
 

Premier Sponsor

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top