Moisture meters II

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Jeff

New User
Jeff
A spinoff from a recent thread.

http://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/showthread.php?t=59793

Pinless induction meters vs pin meters? Hmmm...which type to consider with pros and cons? :icon_scra

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YG8_Qw8IQSs

1. I have a mini-Ligno E/D (about $100) with 2 sets of pins (3/16" and 7/16") and it's pretty decent overall. The pins work fine in softwoods like SPF but they're a royal PITA to penetrate and seat in hardwoods (oaks, soft maple, etc).

2. A good quality induction meter appears to have better versatility but the entry price is about +/- $200. Note: Rough sawn lumber is not ideal for these because the sensing pad needs a "relatively smooth surface" for a good reading (like a stud sensor on sheetrock), but that's not a show stopper either.
 

bluedawg76

New User
Sam
A spinoff from a recent thread.

http://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/showthread.php?t=59793

Pinless induction meters vs pin meters? Hmmm...which type to consider with pros and cons? :icon_scra

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YG8_Qw8IQSs

1. I have a mini-Ligno E/D (about $100) with 2 sets of pins (3/16" and 7/16") and it's pretty decent overall. The pins work fine in softwoods like SPF but they're a royal PITA to penetrate and seat in hardwoods (oaks, soft maple, etc).

2. A good quality induction meter appears to have better versatility but the entry price is about +/- $200. Note: Rough sawn lumber is not ideal for these because the sensing pad needs a "relatively smooth surface" for a good reading (like a stud sensor on sheetrock), but that's not a show stopper either.
I think I have the same meter from Ligno. Would have to disagree on the difficulty of using though, never recall any issues inserting the pins?
As far as meter choice, as long as the meter is consistent over the range of interest (8-15%), I think you're be fine. For me, above 15%, I don't really care b/c the wood is not useable yet; below 8% is plenty dry for my work. YMMV
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I have the mini-ligno also, it is a great entry level meter for surface moisture readings. Usually wood moisture will migrate evenly and the interior is equal to the surface within a few percent.

It won't help if the wood has been case hardened in a kiln when the surface is dry but the interior is still wet. That is where the induction types shine and can save your tail.

If you are only checking air dried wood you may not need to spend the extra dough.

If you are not sure about the reading you can always cut off an inch or so and check again. Or chisel into the side of a thicker piece.

I'm drying some green wood now and watching it go from 36+ slowly down to 20 or so.
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
Mike and Sam both make good points and thanks. I'll continue using my mini-Ligno E/D, but maybe new woodworkers will benefit from the discussion.
 
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