"Locking"/alignment joint question

wapitiscat

New User
Todd Earnhardt
I'm going to make a stack of trays for a bee house project. I cam across this design from an online vendor and was curious how I might mill the joint circled in red.
I know I can skin this cat and create registration points with a different technique but I'm curious as to how to mill the tongue/bead portion of the joint. Any ideas?
Here's a link to pictures of the full item ...

Spring Reusable Wood Trays for Mason Bees -8mm

Todd

joint.JPG
 

NYTransplant

Tim
Corporate Member
I'd guess they are running lumber through a giant shaper to make the entire profile all at once, so technically not a "joint". You may want to mill a dado on the top and bottom and add a spline to the top (or bottom) dado.

I assume that's one of your cat-skinning strategies ;-)
 

wapitiscat

New User
Todd Earnhardt
I'd guess they are running lumber through a giant shaper to make the entire profile all at once, so technically not a "joint". You may want to mill a dado on the top and bottom and add a spline to the top (or bottom) dado.

I assume that's one of your cat-skinning strategies ;-)
That would be one heck of a shaper stack! And you're right about me considering the saw kerf/spline approach. I'll probably end up making a TS jig to kerf the entire face then use the outer grooves for splines and the rest as "guides" for the drill bit as I may have to flip the piece and drill from the back side to get the hole deep enough. Thanks for the input.

Todd
 
Todd:

They probably run the entire profile on a moulder and then chop it to required lengths. For the "joint", you would need to have about a quarter-inch of wood stick out proud of the face of the flutes ("holes") to cut the bead, and the cove could be cut with the face being flush with the flutes. A cove shaper cutter that size would cut the cove, the bead cutter would need larger shoulder width to cut the shoulder enough to meet flush with the face of the flutes, or you would need a small stack of straight cutters with the same diameter as the bead shoulder. Probably more trouble than it is worth, and more expense if you don't already have the cutters.

The bead probably helps to keep that part of the "joint" from splintering during repeated alignment/stacking, as opposed to a square tongue; you might consider running the cove on all of the components of the "joint" with a small round nose or corebox router bit, and then make a spline with two bullnosed edges, one of which you could glue into the cove on one face of the board. It would replicate the look with much less trouble. That is, unless you are running thousands of linear feet.

Hope this helps.
Tone
 

wapitiscat

New User
Todd Earnhardt
A lot of good suggestions.
Agreed. I have the bits that have been mentioned. Used them on a strip canoe project a while back. I think I'll end up going with more of a spline/dowel approach. Thanks for all the input so far. I'll post a pic once I get a set milled.

Todd
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
A custom ground set of cutters for a table saw moulding head would work.
Considering the $40.00 price tag, I'm not sure it would be worth the time. If the proper wood (no knots) has to be bought at retail, then that's another expense.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
This is where a Belsaw planer/molder would come in handy. One knife, two to three passes on each side, and done.
 

JNCarr

Joe
Corporate Member
If you happen to have a round over router bit with desired radius, a pass on each side will work.
Attached shows one side already cut.
 

Attachments

  • Two pass beading.jpg
    Two pass beading.jpg
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bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Those holes are 5/16" (8mm) in diameter. The width of the stock seems to be 6" wide and the dept seems to be 6" deep. Roughly 2 board feet for the $40.00 set.
The indexing groove seems to be 3/16".

That Mason bee house is interesting. I hadn't realized the immense value of these bees. They don't bore holes but use existing holes. I like that.
The Mason bee seems to be the next rabbit hole I venture into. Thanks ( I think).
 

charlessenf

(;harles
Senior User
I would cut a cove in both parts then glue a small dowel in one.
Yep, good idea! That way your 1/4" MLCS bit can be set to cut 1/2 the depth needed to house half a 1/4" dowel in the edges of each layer - one bit, one setting for every board left and right.

Then any old dowel might do.

A similar dowel and a registration block or three wood facilitate the 'tunnels' sure to fit the Mason bees' knees. I think he said he's got teh registration issue covered.
 

charlessenf

(;harles
Senior User
Those holes are 5/16" (8mm) in diameter. The width of the stock seems to be 6" wide and the dept seems to be 6" deep. Roughly 2 board feet for the $40.00 set.
The indexing groove seems to be 3/16".

That Mason bee house is interesting. I hadn't realized the immense value of these bees. They don't bore holes but use existing holes. I like that.
The Mason bee seems to be the next rabbit hole I venture into. Thanks ( I think).
Indeed. if he gets this all worked out, maybe he'll write it up with pictures and share it here - certainly a project for turning scraps into a thing of beauty and or utility - or both.
 

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