I wish to stare at a starrett but the savings doesn't allow it.

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michaelgarner

New User
Michael
Well I would love to own a starrett square, they are the standard. But with my current situation I cant afford to shell out the money. I know i know, buy the best tools and you only buy them once. The question I have though, are there any squares out there that are close to a starrett in tolerances? Thanks for your help friends and have a blessed day.
 

scsmith42

New User
Scott Smith
Michael,

RE machinist tools, in addition to Starret, Brown and Sharp and Mitutoya are both top of the line brands.

More "value" priced brands include General, NSK and Central (the US brands, not the inexpensive stuff from HF).

Check out MSC or J&L Industrial Supply (they are both online). They sell to machine shops and have very high quality tools (even their value brands are pretty good) at excellent prices.

Scott
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
Most of the maintenance supply companies will have an inhouse off brand square that is close to Starrett quality for about half the price.

When I say close I mean maybe +- .005 per foot as opposed to .001 per foot.

For a machinist that is not close or even in the ball park, but for woodworking it is more than excellent.

Look at Enco, MSC, Fowler and there are some great manufacturers in Germany. I'm sure you can find a homegrown square for a great price there.
 

WoodWrangler

Jeremy
Senior User
I'm thinking you could find a Starrett for less than new at the antique groups meeting that Tarhead had posted about ... last year I saw a good many.
 

michaelgarner

New User
Michael
Thanks friends. I will check out those leads, I have a couple places to look at on the local economy, the language barrier is hard while I'm studying German
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
What kind of square are you talking about? A try square? If it lines up after flipping it on a straight edge, it is square enough for wood working. If it is a combo square, look for one with a cast iron base (or stainless or other hard metal). If tried against a known square, it can be adjusted with a thin file to get into square. (Filing down the slot where the scale goes though) Once square you're okay. Aluminum based combo squares are easier to align, but will wear out of tolerance more quickly. Stay away from squares where the graduations are stamped on the scale arm. The stamping causes bulges on the edge that can lead to problems, unless you flatten them (thinking of hand plane soles, ain't ya!). Etched markings make it easier to get it true if it isn't already so.

JMTCW

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