How do you drum-sand thin stock ?

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mkepke

Mark
Senior User
I'm looking for tips on drum-sanding thin stock.

I was drumsanding 2" x 18" strips of cherry down to 1/16" on my Woodmaster 38" sander and tearing paper..fast. I think the wood was flexing as it went through the machine and catching the edge of the sandpaper wrap. Once the paper starts to tear, it catches on the conveyor belt and peels off the drum.

I solved the problem by taping the cherry to a carrier board, but this does not lend itself to speedy production !

How do YOU sand thin stock ?

-Mark
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
I've never sanded anything that thin, the thinnest I've gone is 1/8", so this may not work for you. I had some problems with the front edge catching on something and sniping. No problems with the sandpaper tearing though. What I did was ease the leading and trailing edge with some 150 grit sandpaper. That worked for me. Whether that's faster than taping them to a carrier board...
 

Tarhead

Mark
Corporate Member
Not everyone has it but this is an excellent application for hot hide glue to attach the workpiece to a piece of MDF instead of doublesided tape. A hair dryer works well to melt it and a damp paper towel removes it from your thin workpiece.
 

scsmith42

New User
Scott Smith
I routinely sand to .050 on my wide belt sander (have to fiddle with the controls a bit to get it that low), but I also use a "sanding sled" that I made from a long piece of MDF with 60 grit sandpaper laminated to one wide. It works great.

The veneer is laid down on the sandpaper, and the entire assembly run though. Works great.
 

Splint Eastwood

New User
Matt
I routinely sand to .050 on my wide belt sander (have to fiddle with the controls a bit to get it that low), but I also use a "sanding sled" that I made from a long piece of MDF with 60 grit sandpaper laminated to one wide. It works great.

The veneer is laid down on the sandpaper, and the entire assembly run though. Works great.

No issues, doing this way?

M
 
M

McRabbet

Aside from the excellent suggestions regarding a carrier board for your thin stock, it is also important to avoid trying to take too much off in a single pass. I tore 6" Hook & Loop paper off my 26" Woodmaster several times by trying to take too big a bite. At most, I make a 1/4 turn with the thickness adjustment and then take two passes at that setting. These sanders are made for finishing a surface, not as a thicknessing tool.
 

Matt Furjanic

Matt
Senior User
Make a 3" wide carrier board (3/4 plywood probably best). Get a 3" wide roll of 80 grit sandpaper. Glue the sandpaper - back side down to the carrier board (I used a spray adhesive). The sandpaper on the carrier will keep the thin stock from slipping - no double sided tape needed. I been doing this for years and have never had a problem. Matt...
 

Splint Eastwood

New User
Matt
Aside from the excellent suggestions regarding a carrier board for your thin stock, it is also important to avoid trying to take too much off in a single pass. I tore 6" Hook & Loop paper off my 26" Woodmaster several times by trying to take too big a bite. At most, I make a 1/4 turn with the thickness adjustment and then take two passes at that setting. These sanders are made for finishing a surface, not as a thicknessing tool.

Rob,

+1 :icon_thum


Or, instead of 1/4 in turn, run the piece thru at zero, then just feel/hear the piece dragging across the drum, then use that incremental turn to take those "little bites".

Especially with figured woods,

M
 

mkepke

Mark
Senior User
Great tips everyone !

Now I need to make sure I finish my sanding before my wife notices her hair-dryer is missing.

-Mark
 
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