Help! Need Joint Glue Clamp Advice

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
Make very sure it fits correctly, I wood use CA glue in several spots plus titebond II or 3. CA will hold until glue dries. Tape around it to help hold position
 

creasman

Jim
User
Sort of hard to describe how I'd do it, but here goes. Use a piece of scrap 1x3 (with tape or finish to prevent glue from sticking). Run this. the length of the board, extend it over by a 1/2" or so and add a C-clamp at each end to hold it in place. Clamp the short piece of end grain to the scrap and in place using several C-clamps across the width. Now, use another scrap 1x1 across the length of the short run and use bar clamps to hold it in place. As you tighten the bar clamps your pulling it horizontally and the C-clamps pull it vertically. The 1x3 extending over prevents it from rising up.

Here's a (very) rough sketch of what I mean. This is the view from the side. The arrows indicate the direction of force from the clamps. Tighten both sets evenly to prevent it from pulling too much in any direction. Really, though, the C-clamps being just snug will hold it securely as you tighten the bar clamps. The overhang of the 1x3 is just to help you get started.
1595891310920.png
 

creasman

Jim
User
Glad I could help. Let us know how it looks when it's out of the clamps. Will be a nice looking table. BTW, what wood are you using?
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
Glad I could help. Let us know how it looks when it's out of the clamps. Will be a nice looking table. BTW, what wood are you using?
It’s a Cherry slab being made into a bench or small table - noir sure which yet. I decided to finish off the ends rather than leave them natural. Trying to get a more finished look. Fingers crossed...
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
With carefully watching how much glue I used, the joints came out very well - taping the joint together first to minimize glue squeeze out was included with the clamping menagerie.

FYI: I cut the miters on my 1960 DeWalt GWI radial arm saw after calibrating the table and blade angle with a Wixey magnetic electronic angle gauge. Even with a bit of wave in the slab flatness, the joint came together nicely. My confidence as a woodworker took a real surge after this little procedure. Thanks again for the words of wisdom from you guys...
 

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Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
That's a nice looking miter joint covering the end grain. I've never seen anything like that. How thick is the slab?

Can you add a picture of the side view of the slab with the mitered piece glued on? Kind of like this?

mitered slab.jpg
 

creasman

Jim
User
My confidence as a woodworker took a real surge after this little procedure.
Very pleased to hear that! Another trick I learned from my father is to spread a small bit of glue across the bend of this joint and then sand the corner lightly by sanding each surface, vertical and horizontal. The sanding creates sawdust that immediately mixes with the glue. Any small gaps will instantly disappear and it will look like the wood just continues without any breaks.
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
You are gluing endgrain. A spline, biscuits, or Dominoes will hold the miter in place while clamping.

You should use one of them on a miter joint anyway.......

Since its already glued up, I highly recommend you reinforce it with glue blocks.
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
Thanks for all the comments and inquiry.

Jeff - it’s a 1.5” thick slab with irregular edge surfaces - I just saw off the ‘return’ overhanging portion to meet up with the slab‘s end miter cut and sand/shape to smooth out. No way to match anything up like a traditional piece.

Jim - i depend on that very technique often. I use Titebond’s Clear glue to avoid that yellow look with their wood glues.

DrBob - I agree in principle but in practice have never had an issue with material this thick. Thinner or more delicate construction would certainly merit the domino treatment. There’s nothing hanging down to adhere glue blocks too on this piece but I would agree they are needed elsewhere.

UPDATE: I’ve chosen to create a floating table top design for this slab. Am using Maple for the base and have glued up all the base pieces except the legs today. Am thinking of a clear finish to Retain the natural Maple color as a contrast to the Cherry slab.
 

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JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
I really like your slab. I think the maple base overpowers it. I would suggest that you saw off at least half off the bottom to make it more "delicate" so that the eye is brought to the top instead of the base.
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
I really like your slab. I think the maple base overpowers it. I would suggest that you saw off at least half off the bottom to make it more "delicate" so that the eye is brought to the top instead of the base.
I thought about that and understand your POV but with the pencil legs added I wanted the Maple base portion to be prominent to add some visual mass and confirm the ‘floating’ appearance. Don’t think it will look too large once it’s at viewing height, too. Matter of taste I know - it’s my first shot at this design. If it becomes objectionable I can and will shorten that base. Thanks for your input...
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
Jeff - it’s a 1.5” thick slab with irregular edge surfaces - I just saw off the ‘return’ overhanging portion to meet up with the slab‘s end miter cut and sand/shape to smooth out. No way to match anything up like a traditional piece.
Thanks. I think that I can just barely see the miter joint on the right hand side (at least I think that I can see it).
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
Thanks. I think that I can just barely see the miter joint on the right hand side (at least I think that I can see it).
Can’t hide the joint where it meets the slab unless the two surfaces are very close - not so on this one. Still has bark on the back side! Viewed from above it is pretty decent looking and those returns really helped it look more finished. Now I just gotta convince JohnnyR that my taller apron design isn’t going to ruin the final product. (I can shorten it up if necessary...)
 

Matt Furjanic

Matt
Senior User
Can you tell us more about how to use shrink wrap. Where do you get shrink wrap?
Hi Jeff, shrink wrap is like Saran Wrap on a roll. I find the most useful are the 5” wide rolls. You can get it in any home improvement or hardware store or Amazon. I roll usually has several hundred to a thousand feet and will last a long time. About $10 a roll..
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
I really like your slab. I think the maple base overpowers it. I would suggest that you saw off at least half off the bottom to make it more "delicate" so that the eye is brought to the top instead of the base.
Here’s where I’m at with this floating table design - and I think I see the problem. The gap between the apron and slab is large enough to see the infrastructure, which is not supposed to happen, right? The second shot shows the pedestals I need to shorten to hide the inner construct. Any other observations, JohnnyR?
 

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JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
Well, since you asked, the following is my opinion and may not be shared by others and hope you'll take it as constructive. While it might be deceptive from the photos, I think the whole base is too massive. It appears you're using 1" or thicker lumber where I would use something less than 3/4". The different thicknesses of the side/end pieces may be evident even if you lower the top. In the future, if you used dados rather than mortises for the support pieces, I would stop them before the top so they are not evident. You may be planning some more work on these but as they are the support pieces are too thick. What I would do is sculpt them - clean up the edges with a spindle sander ( you can get an inexpensive attachment for a drill press if you don't have one) maybe slice off some width above the dados and use a round over bit to make them look more like a wine glass.
The more I look at it, the less objectionable the size of the base as it will be less over powering if finished like the beautiful slab.
Thanks for the work in progress photos.
 

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