Hello!

DavidP

New User
David
Hello! I’m David Propst in Granite Falls, just north of Hickory NC. I am a woodturner getting back to turning after a long hiatus. I started turning 12/31/1999 when I was introduced to the the lathe at a get together of folks from the long defunct Badger Pond forum. Until then I was thinking I’d someday make great furniture.
Since that day my table saw largely exists to make turning tool storage and accessories .
I soon bought an old delta Rockwell lathe, then after joining the NC Woodturners club bought a beautiful Conover lathe from a member. By 2003 I had taken a couple classes with David Ellsworth and upgraded to a gorgeous 2hp Poolewood lathe.
I’ve made some great friends through turning. One of those original Badger Pond posters from Indy is like my sister and a respected turner. Over the next 12 years or so I did not turn as much as I liked. Life, layoff, nursing school, and nurse practitioner school got in the way. In 2013, I started again turning a good bit. In 2016 plans to do extensive house remodeling, including a proper shop space morphed into moving to a new home instead. Part of these plans included selling the Poolewood for my dream and last lathe, a Robust American Beauty.
I’d turned on this lathe for a week at three different Arrowmont classes. I equate turning on an American Beauty to like driving a super responsive sports car, the old Subaru is just never going to feel the same (though I did Love my dearly departed Baja). I equate it it a Saturday dock fisherman wanting a top of the line bass boat, but I have friends who spend more on motorcycles, chasing little white balls, or sports cars.
So after the move, the “perfect” shop space in the new home became a family room instead. A huge amount of landscaping and life again delayed having a shop, and I didn’t have a lathe. Well the time has come.
After a long Saturday of pulling cable and running conduit “my side” of the detached garage will have a 100A subpanel with 110/220 to spare by tomorrow. The old 1972 Unisaw tabletop is polished to make turning storage, the bandsaw is eagerly awaiting some wet, green blanks, and oh yea, the American Beauty will be in the center of the shop by March.
 

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tvrgeek

Scott
User
I just wonder. Turning like you have done is beautiful, really. If I remember back in the dark ages ( high school) turning is somehow quite satisfying. But, what do you do with them? I can see a couple around the house. Maybe a couple vase stands, lamp base, or plant pots, but then what? Really curious. It would be hard to see recovering your costs selling them ( And NC would want to property tax all your machines every year) and after all your relatives get one or two for Christmas, then what?
 

Michael Mathews

Michael
Corporate Member
Welcome David! I do some turning as well! I call it, therapy :cool::cool::cool: Nice work on the bowls! You can see one of my pieces over there <---
Maybe some day we can get together and share notes.
 

DavidP

New User
David
I just wonder. Turning like you have done is beautiful, really. If I remember back in the dark ages ( high school) turning is somehow quite satisfying. But, what do you do with them? I can see a couple around the house. Maybe a couple vase stands, lamp base, or plant pots, but then what? Really curious. It would be hard to see recovering your costs selling them ( And NC would want to property tax all your machines every year) and after all your relatives get one or two for Christmas, then what?
One of the most vexing and hilarious questions turners get at shows is “what can you do with it?”.
It’s just art. No justification needed.
It’s fun, relaxing, challenging, and creative.
I doubt I’ll ever sell my work. Too much stress.
 

golfdad

Co-director of Outreach
Dirk
Corporate Member
Welcome aboard. Looks like you've already mastered turning. Very nice projects
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
One of the most vexing and hilarious questions turners get at shows is “what can you do with it?”.
It’s just art. No justification needed.
It’s fun, relaxing, challenging, and creative.
I doubt I’ll ever sell my work. Too much stress.
Yes, I agree with all that which is why I'm interested. My wife does cross-stich. We have probably 100 of them done, walls covered, 100 or so in waiting. At least they fit in a box, but I can't imagine what one does with all those turnings? :)
 

Roy G

Roy
Senior User
Plenty of charities like turned objects for silent auctions. I must have given away dozens of bowls over the years for good causes. Wedding gifts, housewarming presents, just basic things like that. Plus some bowls get broken and its nice to be able to replace them for the people that cherished them.

Roy G
 

llucas

luke
Senior User
David, Welcome! Yes, turning is therapy...and that is enough if nothing else. Sometimes when I find myself in the shop with no immediate project at hand, I will grab a piece of wood and mount it on the lathe....three hours later I am asking myself why did I get away from turning.
A friend of mine once told me that the trouble with turning is that there is no orgasm...nothing to tell you it's time to quit.
 

Oka

Board of Directors, Vice President
Casey
Staff member
Corporate Member
Welcome David, This the right place for you.
 

DavidP

New User
David
Yes, I agree with all that which is why I'm interested. My wife does cross-stich. We have probably 100 of them done, walls covered, 100 or so in waiting. At least they fit in a box, but I can't imagine what one does with all those turnings? :)
I understand. When I get enough time to turn that much I'll be happy to hand them out on the street. :)
 

chris_goris

Chris
Senior User
One of the most vexing and hilarious questions turners get at shows is “what can you do with it?”.
It’s just art. No justification needed.
It’s fun, relaxing, challenging, and creative.
I doubt I’ll ever sell my work. Too much stress.
Its a great way to give donations to local charities instead of donating money. There are lots of people who will eagerly fork out a dollar or 2 for a chance in a raffle to win a beautiful piece of artwork like this that they could otherwise not afford.
 

Raymond

Raymond
Corporate Member
Yes, I agree with all that which is why I'm interested. My wife does cross-stich. We have probably 100 of them done, walls covered, 100 or so in waiting. At least they fit in a box, but I can't imagine what one does with all those turnings? :)
I just enjoy seeing the look on people's faces when I just hand the turned object to them and they realize - it's a freebee! I never got started with the idea of selling my turnings. I love changing a log into a toothpick just for the fun of it!:D
 

DavidP

New User
David
I just enjoy seeing the look on people's faces when I just hand the turned object to them and they realize - it's a freebee! I never got started with the idea of selling my turnings. I love changing a log into a toothpick just for the fun of it!:D
When I had someone a bowl or hollowform and I notice that they almost caress it as they hold it It fills my heart with joy. I usually give it to them on the spot.
This may not make sense unless you are a tuner. A well-designed piece just "feels right". Richard Raffin's "Turned Bowl Design" should be required reading for all turners. It's long out of print, but easy to find.
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
When I had someone a bowl or hollowform and I notice that they almost caress it as they hold it It fills my heart with joy. I usually give it to them on the spot.
This may not make sense unless you are a tuner. A well-designed piece just "feels right". Richard Raffin's "Turned Bowl Design" should be required reading for all turners. It's long out of print, but easy to find.
Welcome David,
I agree Richard Raffin's "Turned Bowl Design" is a GREAT book as are all of his books and videos as well as Mike Darlow's writing.
I have to say that I cant wait to see what you do with the "Beauty" since all of the pieces you posted are excellent!
 

Charlie

Charlie
Corporate Member
I just wonder. Turning like you have done is beautiful, really. If I remember back in the dark ages ( high school) turning is somehow quite satisfying. But, what do you do with them? I can see a couple around the house. Maybe a couple vase stands, lamp base, or plant pots, but then what? Really curious. It would be hard to see recovering your costs selling them ( And NC would want to property tax all your machines every year) and after all your relatives get one or two for Christmas, then what?
I recently completed my 282nd segmented turning. Some took 30 hours, some 100+ hours to complete. I have never sold one and don't plan to. I have given away about 230. I have never had a problem finding a home for one. The responses and smiles that you receive when giving one to someone far exceeds any monetary gain.

David, your turnings are beautiful.
 

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