Harbor Freight - Chicago Electric Chain Saw Sharpener

junquecol

Bruce
User
Couple years back, bought a used Chicago Electric chain saw sharpener. Paid fifteen bucks for it in thrift store. This week have been cutting down, and cutting into fire wood lengths four dead trees from our front lot. Not sure of species, only that they are hard and have a stringy trunk . You can't split them with an axe, but a 48,000# thrust log splitter has no problem splitting them. Because of toughness of wood, needed to sharpen chain saw. Used my HF sharpener, and it did a GREAT JOB. After sharpening, chips the size of raisins were being emitted from cut. New, at HF, this sharpener sells for $29.99. No it's not a $169 Oregon, but does a more than adequate job.
 

pcooper

Phillip Cooper
Corporate Member
I've seen one of those being used, and yes, it's a decent tool, one of the few H-F winners.
 

pcooper

Phillip Cooper
Corporate Member
Hmmm. It only took me a few tries to master a file. Maybe if you had a 30 inch bar...
Maybe you don't wear a chain out as bad as some of us do... There are a few I've sharpened in years gone by that no file would work on, but if you're routinely sharpening like you should, a file is faster.
 

LeftyTom

Tom
Corporate Member
Hmmm. It only took me a few tries to master a file. Maybe if you had a 30 inch bar...
I use one of those gizmos that have the round file between flat files. I just position the files as indicated on the handle. Sharpen the cutters on one side of the chain, then do the other side. Quick and easy.
 

LocoWoodWork

Steve
Corporate Member
I've had a HF sharpener for years. Really like it. Makes easy work to sharpen all chains at one sitting.
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
Well, if you trash one THAT bad... I even have hit a rock. If one is that bad, well I get Oregon chains is bulk from Amazon.

A wood hand screw makes a really nice vise BTW.
 

spartyon8

Peter
User
Hmmm. It only took me a few tries to master a file. Maybe if you had a 30 inch bar...
Same, but this thing makes sharpening quicker and more consistent. I bought one as I was cutting a lot of oaks and sharpening a ton. Chains were cutting better than hand filing. Only thing I can think of is better consistency. Plus, when you are sharpening chains in bulk you fly through them faster with this than a hand file.
 

Eric G

Eric
Senior User
Project Farm is one of my favorite youtube channels and put out a video last week about testing sharpeners. Worth the watch. He has the HF sharpener in there that he liked for the price point.

 

LocoWoodWork

Steve
Corporate Member
Project Farm is one of my favorite youtube channels and put out a video last week about testing sharpeners. Worth the watch. He has the HF sharpener in there that he liked for the price point.

+++ I always watch PF to see what he says before making any purchases.
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
Rare, a good attempt at an objective review. Watched the one on chain brands. Sticking with Oregon. I may think about the Stihl 2 in-1 jig over my "field" jig only because it looks a little easier. It did take 3 or 4 times to master the file, but I figure it is good when I get nice long shavings. When you get sawdust, time to stop and sharpen.
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
The Oregon 23820 Sure Sharp looks very similar to the Granberg for half the price. Advantage I see over the 2 in 1 is it clamps the tooth .
Amazon has several other models.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Rare, a good attempt at an objective review. Watched the one on chain brands. Sticking with Oregon. I may think about the Stihl 2 in-1 jig over my "field" jig only because it looks a little easier. It did take 3 or 4 times to master the file, but I figure it is good when I get nice long shavings. When you get sawdust, time to stop and sharpen.
Oregon chain is now made in, yep you guessed it, China. One of the nice things I like about the HF grinder is, that after using it to sharpen chain, then cutting wood, I can reinsert chain into sharpener, advance link locator about a 1/4 turn, and touch up teeth for next use. All will have the same amount taken off them. Remember when it comes to sharpening, most here are mere mortals, and could use all the help available. In the line of hand filing a chain, I put in the same catagory as cutting down a 48" diameter white oak with a bush axe, instead of a chain saw I have done that, as it was a five mile hike (round trip) back to truck to get chain saw.
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
Don't care where it is made. It is the quality that counts.
The HF and other similar change the shape of the tooth. I guess a bad shape sharp beats a dull one, but still, tales me just minutes to do my saw. Don't have to take the chain off. I use the simple flat Oregon guide and a flat file by hand. I assure you, I am no gifted pro, but 4 or 5 stokes with a file is pretty simple. I might go out on a limb ( pun intended) and say, if you can't use a file, maybe a chain saw is way too dangerous for you. :)
 

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