Glue for Nylon

patlaw

Mike
Corporate Member
Is there such a thing as glue that will stick to nylon and similar materials? I just tried Barge's, and it didn't.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
Soft setting epoxy, soft setting CA type glues and phenol-formaldehyde based glues all work. My 1st go to is the soft setting Epoxy (rubbery set).
 

tvrgeek

tvrgeek
User
Darn near not glue-able. Heat fuse or chemical bond. Any glue is very week. Poly about the same.
 

lspooz

Larry
Corporate Member
From a website about gluing 3d printed items (which frequently use nylon, website is " all3d dot com "


Best Versatility: Polyurethane Glue
Gorilla polyurethane glue will adhere to almost anything.
If you’re looking for something sticky that’ll adhere almost anything, look no further than polyurethane glues. Even nylon, a material notoriously difficult to glue, will likely work with this tacky substance. What’s more, polyurethane glues are usually waterproof and can range anywhere from rigid to flexible, covering a variety of use cases.
The main drawback of polyurethane glues will be the extra thickness added when applied.
Surface preparation: Sand, clean, and degrease bonding surfaces.
Safety: Use in a ventilated area, keep away from skin.
Suitable for: PLA, ABS, PETG, Nylon

Hope this helps, haven't used it yet myself
 

Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
I have used E6000 to glue sawtooth hangers on the back of vinyl records. I have even fixed a lampshade that my husband broke one of the skinny wire pieces off. I don’t know about nylon but it hasn’t failed me yet. I get the clear. It may take 72 hours before full bond is achieved.
 

patlaw

Mike
Corporate Member
Soft setting epoxy, soft setting CA type glues and phenol-formaldehyde based glues all work. My 1st go to is the soft setting Epoxy (rubbery set).
I don't know what any of that stuff is.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
Soft setting epoxy is that an epoxy that does not set hard , it dries to the hardness of silicone. Soft setting CA - is super glue that does not dry hard. Phenol-formaldehyde based glues are polyurethane type glues, they have a wide range of design mixes that are are made to adhere to specific types of materials. In all cases sand prep and makings sure the surfaces are clean are a given. One thing a firend does is use tiny drill bits and pock the surface.


I don't know what any of that stuff is.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
What is the material that you're trying to glue the nylon too? That may help to guide your choice of what to use.
 

Inarticulate

Matt
User
CA glue is your best bet, particularly Loctite 401. Roughening the surface does not appear to improve the bond for Nylon. Take a look at Loctite/Henkel's plastic bonding guide. Its one of the most useful documents I've come across for adhesives. Its a little difficult to get the hang of using it but once you figure it out, its terrific:
 

Attachments

Alan in Little Washington

Alan Schaffter
Corporate Member
You can sort of bond nylon, Delrin, HDPE, etc. etc, with a number of adhesives, but none will be very strong or permanent especially if mechanically stressed, in a wet environment, or if one material expands more than the other with heat. At best, it will be a temporary bond. The best chance to have any bond using cyanoacrylate (super glue) and polyurethane is to prep the nylon with flame. That creates kind of an open pore surface and improves the bond. If you are using anything but a thin strip, the best way is to screw with wood or machine screws. Also, all those plastics drill and tap quite nicely.
 

Inarticulate

Matt
User
You can sort of bond nylon, Delrin, HDPE, etc. etc, with a number of adhesives, but none will be very strong or permanent especially if mechanically stressed, in a wet environment, or if one material expands more than the other with heat. At best, it will be a temporary bond. The best chance to have any bond using cyanoacrylate (super glue) and polyurethane is to prep the nylon with flame. That creates kind of an open pore surface and improves the bond. If you are using anything but a thin strip, the best way is to screw with wood or machine screws. Also, all those plastics drill and tap quite nicely.
Nylon isn't really in the same class of materials as Delrin, HDPE, PP, UHMW etc. Nylon is fairly easy to bond to and isn't nearly as finicky as the low surface energy polymers. You shouldn't have too much trouble with it and shouldn't need to flame treat it. Just make sure to clean it with some isopropyl alcohol and be sure there isn't any debris/grease on the surface.
 

patlaw

Mike
Corporate Member
Believe it or not, I'm trying to lightly tack a 3D printed divider into a translucent small parts organizer tray. The Loctite Vinyl that Raymond suggested really stuck to the divider, but it didn't stick so well to the tray. That could be my fault. I've glued it again and clamped it this time. It may not have had sufficient contact with the tray bottom. In any case, these glue discussions are always helpful (when they include brand names.) Glue is often a great mystery to me. We used to use CA in manufacturing, and it worked great, but I've never had it work for anything for me.
 

Inarticulate

Matt
User
Believe it or not, I'm trying to lightly tack a 3D printed divider into a translucent small parts organizer tray. The Loctite Vinyl that Raymond suggested really stuck to the divider, but it didn't stick so well to the tray. That could be my fault. I've glued it again and clamped it this time. It may not have had sufficient contact with the tray bottom. In any case, these glue discussions are always helpful (when they include brand names.) Glue is often a great mystery to me. We used to use CA in manufacturing, and it worked great, but I've never had it work for anything for me.
Are you sure its nylon? I believe those organizer boxes are typically polypropylene (if its the kind I'm thinking of) which is next to impossible to bond to.
 

patlaw

Mike
Corporate Member
Are you sure its nylon? I believe those organizer boxes are typically polypropylene (if its the kind I'm thinking of) which is next to impossible to bond to.
I really don't know what the material is, but I was told that 3D printing is often done with nylon. What I do know is that it's hard for glue to stick to this stuff. I just checked my latest test. The glue stuck to the 3D divider but not to the tray. If it's polypropylene, what glue should I use?
 

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