General sanding question

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
HI all,

A general sanding question,

With most furniture and most pieces I make, I usually sand down to 320-400 then either steel wool (000) or scrape to lay down any standing fiber. Then go to finish.

Depending on the piece I will start with 60-80, then to 120 or 150, then 220-240, then 320-400. The only time I go beyond if it is some super detail or show piece.

TBH a lot has to do with what sand paper I have in stock.

Just curious what everyone else does.
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
I typically stop at 220, progressing 80-120-180-220. For really rough pieces or end grain cutting boards, I'll start at 60, for smooth wood off the planer I'll start at 120. I will use card scrapers where effective, but still always sand, haven't quite gotten the technique down for a perfectly scraped surface.
Between coats, I'll usually sand with either 320 or 220, depending on the finish.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Oka

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
IMO opinion you're sanding to high. This can affect stain or oil penetration.

Usually no need to go over 220. 180 for oil finish. 320-400 on endgrain, 220/320 for smoothing topcoats.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Oka

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
For most of my projects I've run pieces through the dual drum sander (80-120 grit) for final thicknessing and they come out w/ striations in the wood. Then I begin the 'hand' sanding w/ a ROS.

For dense, hard woods (e.g. white oak, walnut, hickory, etc.) I start w/ 100. For softer woods I start w/ 120. After that I progress through 150-180-220. If I want a really smooth finish I will go on to 320 by hand (no power sander).

If I plan to apply a water based finish (usually water soluble dye) directly onto the bare wood I will wet the wood to raise the grain after the 180 and 220 sanding. If the finish will not involve water coming in contact w/ the bare wood I will only wet after the 220.
 
  • Thanks
Reactions: Oka

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
For flat work I scrape then hand sand with 400 just to find places I missed or need more scraping. The 400 makes the surface dusty without messing up the scraped finish too much.

A couple coats of penetrating oil finish then 600 grit by hand and one final coat of hand rubbed oil.

F1BA0A53-166D-4DFE-9B7A-D6AB1EDF2CD2_1_201_a.jpeg
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
I typically stop at 220, progressing 80-120-180-220. For really rough pieces or end grain cutting boards, I'll start at 60, for smooth wood off the planer I'll start at 120. I will use card scrapers where effective, but still always sand, haven't quite gotten the technique down for a perfectly scraped surface.
Between coats, I'll usually sand with either 320 or 220, depending on the finish.
Yep, same here. I have changed to spraying conversion varnish on all my work due to the fast turn around and durability. (less than 1 hour start to finish including drying times, seal coat and sanding)
They recommend not to go beyond 220 for the seal coat and not beyond 320 for the seal coat scuff sand. The varnish fills scratches from 220, cannot notice anything.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Oka

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top