Flocking

Pop Golden

Pop
Corporate Member
I'm thinking of flocking 2 drawers in a new cabinet. Has someone out there done this? How di it go? What equipment do I but? Is it difficult? Need info.

Pop
 

creasman

Jim
Corporate Member
I've done this for several drawers and boxes that were French fit for the tools they contain. I was concerned it might be difficult but after trying it's not. Really very easy to do and no expensive equipment required. I purchased everything from Klingspor's. You need the undercoat/adhesive, the fibers and a flocking tube. The brand I used is Flock It! by Suede-Tex. The adhesive and fibers need to be the same color, black in my case.

The instruction sheet that came with the tube breaks down the process. In their words, "The application of Suede-Tex is a simple process used in junior high school wood-shops." Figured if a 6/7th grader could do I wouldn't mess it up! One caution is to plan it out so you have a container for catching the excess fibers. These can be reused. You want to cover the area thoroughly and then shake off the excess after the adhesive is dry (next day).
 

Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
I flock small boxes. It’s not difficult. Buy the glue and flockthe same color,Suede-Tex. You will also need the applicator. I finish the box first. I also put my box in a larger box to apply the flocking, it is messy.
Things I have learned:
Get everything ready first, load the applicator, have the place you’re going to flock ready.
You will want something to wipe up any glue that gets where it’s not supposed to be QUICKLY. It will stain, even on a gloss finish.
Use a generous amount of the flocking, its reusable. Look carefully for any shine, that means add more flocking.
Let it dry at least 24 hours.
When you turn it over in that larger box and tap the excess out it can be messy.
Put that extra back in the flocking bag.
I keep the kit in a plastic shoe box. I have been told that you can blow out the applicator and use it for different colors. I like the convenience of separate kits.
 

DKA

Kelly
User
I've done this for several drawers and boxes that were French fit for the tools they contain. I was concerned it might be difficult but after trying it's not. Really very easy to do and no expensive equipment required. I purchased everything from Klingspor's. You need the undercoat/adhesive, the fibers and a flocking tube. The brand I used is Flock It! by Suede-Tex. The adhesive and fibers need to be the same color, black in my case.

The instruction sheet that came with the tube breaks down the process. In their words, "The application of Suede-Tex is a simple process used in junior high school wood-shops." Figured if a 6/7th grader could do I wouldn't mess it up! One caution is to plan it out so you have a container for catching the excess fibers. These can be reused. You want to cover the area thoroughly and then shake off the excess after the adhesive is dry (next day).
How do you “French fit” a box ?
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
Berta's tips are spot on. Two additional tips:
- Make sure the surface you're flocking is not too porous, or it will absorb too much of the glue and the flocking won't stick very well. I typically apply 1-2 coats of finish to the area to be flocked (shellac, polyurethane, etc.). That creates a good base for the glue.
- Masking tape can be your friend to ensure the glue only goes where it is supposed to go
 

creasman

Jim
Corporate Member
How do you “French fit” a box ?
French fit refers to making a cavity where the tool (or whatever object) fits into the container. Below is a box I made for a Lie-Nielsen inlay tool and the cutters. In the first picture you see the tool out of the cavity that just matches the shape. I did this by excavating a piece of 1/2" MDF to match the shape. I flocked the MDF before inserting it into the box.

IMG_2708.jpg

IMG_2709.jpg
 

joec

joe
User
I have this coming up for a display table. I guess flocking replicates the stick on felt paper without the seams?
 

Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
I tried blue painters tape, the glue got under, tried frog tape, glue got under.
I do finish and spray everything before flocking. I don’t trust the tape. I ruined one of my turtle boxes trusting the tape. This is how I know that that semigloss spray can stain. I now free hand it with a damp cloth waiting right beside me just in case.
 

beloitdavisja

James
Corporate Member
+1 for not trusting the tape. I flock my bandsaw box drawers, and I learned that the glue will get under the tape, or the tape just doesn't stick well to the drawer. Free handing it was faster and less mistakes.

I put whatever I'm flocking in a big rubbermaid container. After applying the flocking, tap the excess in the container, and then empty the container back into your bag of flocking fiber to use again. A bag of flocking fiber lasts for a while if you reclaim the unused fiber afterwards. The rubbermaid container just makes it easy to collect after you're done.

Also - Wear a respirator when applying the fiber. You don't want to be flocking your lungs.
 

DKA

Kelly
User
French fit refers to making a cavity where the tool (or whatever object) fits into the container. Below is a box I made for a Lie-Nielsen inlay tool and the cutters. In the first picture you see the tool out of the cavity that just matches the shape. I did this by excavating a piece of 1/2" MDF to match the shape. I flocked the MDF before inserting it into the box.

View attachment 198833
View attachment 198834
OK. So you do the cavity by hand. I was thinking about that foam that you can press something into.
 

creasman

Jim
Corporate Member
So you do the cavity by hand. I was thinking about that foam that you can press something into.
Yes, in my case I used a Forstner bit to drill out the large are and then chisels to cut the rest. I finished with a small router plane to smooth up the bottom. Any divots or mistakes can be filled with putty before applying the flocking. The foam you mention might work as the base, though I'd be concerned the flocking adhesive would dissolve it.
 

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