Finished my new Moravian workbench

Yelverton

Mitch
Corporate Member
Well, almost finished. Still need to build the tool tray, add end vise, add dog holes, trim the ends of the top and cut up some material for the lower shelf. Doesn't seem like much after using mostly hand tools to build what you see here. We're going to be moving early next year, so I wanted something that would be easy to disassemble and move. As an NC native who has spent a lot of time in Winston-Salem, I was also drawn to building something with a local pedigree.

I did mix things up a bit from the usual Moravian benches - obviously a face vise instead of a wood leg vise, making it a bit larger using two laminated tops (one 12" and one 8", so they'd fit through the planer), and making it a little bit deeper (26" total including tool tray). I also went with a cleat system for attaching the tops, rather than trying the blind pegging technique, mostly since I can't drill a plumb hole to save my life. I'm happy with the result and learned a lot as well as getting some more experience and skill with hand tools.

Having finished this one I'll definitely consider making another one in the future, maybe a little bit fancier.
 

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Yelverton

Mitch
Corporate Member
Great work, you’ll enjoy that bench.
Thanks, I'm definitely looking forward to getting to work.

The first time I went to a NCWW picnic, I told someone that I wanted to get more into hand tool work and they encouraged me to take a class with you. At the time, I didn't have nearly enough knowledge to make a class like that worthwhile, I just wouldn't have gotten anything out of it. Hopefully with some time spent at this bench, I'll get a lot closer to justifying it. If I could learn how to drill a plumb hole and saw straight lines, I'd call it a win.
 

zapdafish

Steve
Senior User
I'm making a reloading bench and made a less beefy base using the Moravian style base. I like that its knockdown and "easy" to move
 

Yelverton

Mitch
Corporate Member
I'm making a reloading bench and made a less beefy base using the Moravian style base. I like that its knockdown and "easy" to move
Absolutely, love that it's knockdown and it seems solid so far. Fingers crossed that the tusk tenons don't need much attention to stay seated.
 

Graywolf

Board of Directors, Vice President
Richard
Corporate Member
Thanks, I'm definitely looking forward to getting to work.

The first time I went to a NCWW picnic, I told someone that I wanted to get more into hand tool work and they encouraged me to take a class with you. At the time, I didn't have nearly enough knowledge to make a class like that worthwhile, I just wouldn't have gotten anything out of it. Hopefully with some time spent at this bench, I'll get a lot closer to justifying it. If I could learn how to drill a plumb hole and saw straight lines, I'd call it a win.
And those are the kinds of thing I enjoy helping folks with. Perhaps when the dust settles from the things we are facing we can make that happen.
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
Gorgeous looking bench, and being able to disassemble it is really useful. Bet that top weights a ton though :)
 

Yelverton

Mitch
Corporate Member
Do power tool woodworkers do this, or is just us hand tool users?
Edit: I believe I misunderstood the post, haha. I think everybody does it. There were some recent posts here about the free book "The Anarchist's Work Bench" - I read it and it's great. The author talks a lot about evolving his benches with each iteration. He also makes a great point (and I'm paraphrasing) that he doesn't build fancy benches "to show his mastery of the craft," but instead builds functional benches that are better work-holding appliances. I hear where he's coming from, but there's something about those incredible sliding dovetails on Ruobo benches.
 
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Yelverton

Mitch
Corporate Member
Gorgeous looking bench, and being able to disassemble it is really useful. Bet that top weights a ton though :)
Yeah, it's not light, but really not too bad. Obviously the front slab is the heaviest, since it has the vises attached. At 12" wide with the two back vise jaws attached (front jaw/screw removed), I'm guessing it's maybe 75-80 lbs. That was another benefit of making the top in two sections (beyond fitting it in the planer). I'd much rather than a 75 lb piece and a 40 lb piece, rather than a 115 lb piece. With the way they wedge together when assembled, it really does seem like a monolithic top when in use.
 

NOTW

Notw
Senior User
I was real close to going Moravian when i started building my new bench, but went split top Roubo at the last second, yours looks great!
 

NOTW

Notw
Senior User
Let's see this Ruobo!
Soon enough, still have to get the mortise and tenons a little tighter fit then i can glue the base up and start cutting the mortises in the top along with routing the slot for the sliding dead man. It is getting exciting because it is starting to look like more than a pile of lumber at this point
 

Yelverton

Mitch
Corporate Member
Soon enough, still have to get the mortise and tenons a little tighter fit then i can glue the base up and start cutting the mortises in the top along with routing the slot for the sliding dead man. It is getting exciting because it is starting to look like more than a pile of lumber at this point
Awesome, it's a fun project when it starts to turn into something. What are your top and base made out of?
 

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