extendable legs for student desk?

BobYon

New User
Bob
I've been pondering on building a student desk for by Grandson who is starting kindergarten soon. My current idea is to build it out of a single sheet of plywood. The top would measure 18 x 36. The sides/legs would measure 18w x 24h.

However, I'd like to make it such that the height would be adjustable. I'd like to allow for 4 -6 inches of height adjustment.

I'm looking for ideas on how to accomplish the height adjustment. I've considered just adding small blocks of plywood on the inside of each corner that would simply bolt to the sides/legs. The adjustable blocks would have bolt holes at various heights to accommodate moving then down to a new hole (thus raising the desk) with each subsequent growth spurt (which seem to occur weekly with this kid.)

Unfortunately I have no pics or plans except those in my head to help describe things.

Any ideas on how to do this will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Bob
 

Claus

Claus
User
30396A2C-2158-47DD-96AD-658FC8CF45C4.jpeg



My wife teaches elementary school. A few years ago I made her some tables for her classroom. the bottoms of the original legs are on the top side of the picture. When she switched grades to bigger kids she needed taller tables so I wrapped an extension around the bottom. Just a thought.

— Claus
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
However, I'd like to make it such that the height would be adjustable. I'd like to allow for 4 -6 inches of height adjustment.

Unfortunately I have no pics or plans except those in my head to help describe things.

The sides/legs would measure 18w x 24h.
Do you want to make the entire desk adjustable from the floor to the desktop? You could make 4 telescoping legs that have a metal pin or bolt to raise the entire desk in increments. A rough sketch would help to see what you'd like to build.
 
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BobYon

New User
Bob
Yes, I want to raise the entire desk.
what you described sounds exactly like what I had in mind.
Thanks
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
A T-nut or threaded insert somewhere under the desk. Turned cylinders for risers center bored and countersunk for a bolt.

I did something similar for a grand daughter's little desk. Turned some legs and end bored them. Installed a threaded insert. Turned risers with a bead to match the bead above. Instead of a bolt, I used some levelers I had that had a particularly long threaded section. I think you'll get the idea.

Two tables shown, one with and the other without the riser cylinders.

1 riser - 1.jpg
1 riser - 2.jpg
 

Dee2

Gene
Corporate Member
here's how it used to be done:
Photo 1 from the outside.
Photo 2 from the inside.
All brass hardware. The wing nut on the inside is attached to a through carriage bolt (see the head 'hump' on the outside photo). Not sure what the purpose of the knurl knob is really not clear to me.

FWIW, the top does not tilt but there is very shallow drawer in it.

Unknown-8.jpeg

Unknown-9.jpeg
 

23tony

Tony
User
The threaded insert seems like the most elegant solution, but what you describe sounds quite workable and simple.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
here's how it used to be done:
Photo 1 from the outside.
Photo 2 from the inside.
All brass hardware. The wing nut on the inside is attached to a through carriage bolt (see the head 'hump' on the outside photo). Not sure what the purpose of the knurl knob is really not clear to me.

FWIW, the top does not tilt but there is very shallow drawer in it.

View attachment 195370
View attachment 195371The
I like that idea.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
Here's a simple table using your dimensions. A top and 4 legs but not adjustable yet.

Kindergarten desk.jpg
 

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