Drilling deeper holes than quill travel.

decibel

Patrick
Corporate Member
So I need to drill out some deep 3/8" holes 5" and 9" deep. Now I ditched my drill press but my old one was only a 4 quill travel. I will eventually replace that drill press that would handle the 5" deep hole but obviously it wouldn't help with the deeper one. I'm probably going to pickup a "cheapo" bench top drill press with 2" travel. So here's my question:

Can I just keep raising the table to get more quill depth. I believe that will make my holes less accurate but maybe not enough to matter for these. for the 9" long one I figured I'll have to drill from both sides vs getting a long bit and raising the table over and over.

Thoughts?
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
I would drill as far as you can, assumably 4", and then finish with a long bit in a portable drill

Plus for future needs like this, you need to buy some raffle tickets and win the top prize - A Nova drill press with 6" travel
 

decibel

Patrick
Corporate Member
I would drill as far as you can, assumably 4", and then finish with a long bit in a portable drill

Plus for future needs like this, you need to buy some raffle tickets and win the top prize - A Nova drill press with 6" travel
:) Nova drill press is in the future I don't think I'll ever need to drill holes like this again. I don't plan on building another big workbench. After watching the video that seems like a total pain in the rear. if I can't get it drilled straight I'll just get the brackets for the vise that doesn't require drilling. This is just karma for me getting rid of my old drill press.
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
:) Nova drill press is in the future I don't think I'll ever need to drill holes like this again. I don't plan on building another big workbench. After watching the video that seems like a total pain in the rear. if I can't get it drilled straight I'll just get the brackets for the vise that doesn't require drilling. This is just karma for me getting rid of my old drill press.
Do you have a wood lathe you could chuck up a long bit into and fabricate some sort of carriage to push the work into the bit?
 

mdbuntyn

Matt
Corporate Member
I don't think I'll ever need to drill holes like this again. I don't plan on building another big workbench.
Sounds like you're installing a Crisscross.

You can try drilling from each side of the leg/chop with a long drill bit in a hand drill. Put a fender washer, or ring, over the bit and close to the chuck. The washer will "walk" if you have the drill tilted up or down, letting you know if you're keeping the drill level.
 

decibel

Patrick
Corporate Member
Do you have a wood lathe you could chuck up a long bit into and fabricate some sort of carriage to push the work into the bit?
Good though dennis.... I do have a full size lathe. I usually use my drill chuck in the tailstock. So I'd just make a carriage and put my chuck in the headstock and go from there. Now I'm not good at jigs so any drawings / examples can help :)
 

decibel

Patrick
Corporate Member
Sounds like you're installing a Crisscross.

You can try drilling from each side of the leg/chop with a long drill bit in a hand drill. Put a fender washer, or ring, over the bit and close to the chuck. The washer will "walk" if you have the drill tilted up or down, letting you know if you're keeping the drill level.
Yes I'm drilling for the criss cross. Should have gotten the freaking retro brackets!
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
What might help is using a plunge router with a 3/8" bit to get the hole started. That should ensure the first 2" or so are perfectly perpendicular. You use the same router bit to make a jig (i.e. a hole in a piece of scrap), hot glue that to the work piece (using the drill bit to align the two), and then finish with a hand drill. Should be plenty accurate. Harbor Freight sells a 12" bit for $8.
 

walnutjerry

Jerry
Senior User
I used a tapered shank bit in the tail stock to drill 9" deep on my lathe when doing kaleidoscope tubes. I was drilling 1 1/2" diameter holes in what was to finish at 2" diameter outside. That worked for me but I am not visualizing what you are drilling into.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
Drilling a hole that is long is really boring....(pun) a hole. What I do is- I have long bits (12") but, to make sure they do not drift, I use a small mag level on the bit and make sure it is plumb. then I jig up a refernce bar or stick to visually make sure the drill does not wane or drift when using. Then, it is just patience to make sure the bit cuts straight. Cutting speed (rpm) can affect it, so get familar with the bit and how it reacts to what you boring.


So I need to drill out some deep 3/8" holes 5" and 9" deep. Now I ditched my drill press but my old one was only a 4 quill travel. I will eventually replace that drill press that would handle the 5" deep hole but obviously it wouldn't help with the deeper one. I'm probably going to pickup a "cheapo" bench top drill press with 2" travel. So here's my question:

Can I just keep raising the table to get more quill depth. I believe that will make my holes less accurate but maybe not enough to matter for these. for the 9" long one I figured I'll have to drill from both sides vs getting a long bit and raising the table over and over.

Thoughts?
 

decibel

Patrick
Corporate Member
I think I have a couple options to try. Good pointers on how to drill by hand so I'll try those first on some scrap to see how bad I do. I have a brace and bit I've not used it much so that may be the route so I have more control.
 

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