Drill Press Restoration

mikeh74

Mike
User
Does anyone here have any experience restoring older tools. I have a Delta DP220 and am trying to decide if I should go down this road. It’s missing the tag to tell me the exact model and serial number.

1C1A5389-25D2-4D49-B32D-209C9B8EC0CC.jpeg
 

zdorsch

Zach
Senior User
I tend to clean my older tools up and use them without restoring. It’s easy to get carried away with restoring.

To test out how far you want to go with the drill press, maybe try something simple like cleaning the rust off of the column, the table, base, etc.

If you haven’t yet, I suggest visiting Old Woodworking Machines - Index page
 

mikeh74

Mike
User
I plugged it in and the motor is not currently working. It kind of stutters but doesn’t spin. Also the quill does not move up and down smoothly so it will definitely need some work.

I’ve started to read through that message board. Lots of information to go through.

I’ve also found a YouTube video on how to break down the drill press if I decide to go that route.
 

Oka

Casey
Corporate Member
I rebuild quite a few tools mostly, because they are low priced and I like understanding the engineering behind a tool.

The Drill Press- Simple restore - Take the motor off and remove the handles, table and sheetmetal (may require removing the pulleys).
Then inspect the pulleys, clean the pulley area with wire brush and clean it with solvent afterward.
Do this with all of the drill press and decide on what you will paint once clean.
Once you have it clean, oil/grease the quill assembly.
Clean all the parts you pulled off and repaint (except the pulleys and top of table).
You may want to replace handles and ends. You can either buy these, or make them. The knobs and rod are usually 1/4 x 20 or 5/16 x 20 typical. If you make the rod just get a chromed rod and cut the threads in or get a paint grade one. The knobs anything will work, just put compatible inserts in the knob to screw on to the rod.
Dissemble the motor if you want to inspect. This is really pretty easy, you can do a continuity check on the parts (look up 120 volt motor testing for rebuild on google or you tube).
The sound you describe is usually either the starting capacitor is bad or the brushes are too worn. Replace the capacitor its cheap less than 15 bucks normally. Brushes are less if they are going to get replaced.
Clean and paint the exterior of the motor and reassemble.
Put the whole thing back together and you are done.

The more complete way, is all the above but you remove the quill and replace the bearings and replace the chuck. They are pretty simple machines actually. It is kinda fun to do a rebuild.

Normally this takes 2-6 hrs of actual labor time to complete.

Hope this helps.
 

mikeh74

Mike
User
I rebuild quite a few tools mostly, because they are low priced and I like understanding the engineering behind a tool.

The Drill Press- Simple restore - Take the motor off and remove the handles, table and sheetmetal (may require removing the pulleys).
Then inspect the pulleys, clean the pulley area with wire brush and clean it with solvent afterward.
Do this with all of the drill press and decide on what you will paint once clean.
Once you have it clean, oil/grease the quill assembly.
Clean all the parts you pulled off and repaint (except the pulleys and top of table).
You may want to replace handles and ends. You can either buy these, or make them. The knobs and rod are usually 1/4 x 20 or 5/16 x 20 typical. If you make the rod just get a chromed rod and cut the threads in or get a paint grade one. The knobs anything will work, just put compatible inserts in the knob to screw on to the rod.
Dissemble the motor if you want to inspect. This is really pretty easy, you can do a continuity check on the parts (look up 120 volt motor testing for rebuild on google or you tube).
The sound you describe is usually either the starting capacitor is bad or the brushes are too worn. Replace the capacitor its cheap less than 15 bucks normally. Brushes are less if they are going to get replaced.
Clean and paint the exterior of the motor and reassemble.
Put the whole thing back together and you are done.

The more complete way, is all the above but you remove the quill and replace the bearings and replace the chuck. They are pretty simple machines actually. It is kinda fun to do a rebuild.

Normally this takes 2-6 hrs of actual labor time to complete.

Hope this helps.
Thanks. After watching some videos, I think I can handle most of it except I know nothing about AC motors. I looked up the motor that is on it and didn’t find much info. Hopefully a more generic search will have better results.
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
Well, it's a split-head and you just about can't get that any more. Probably will need a chuck, and of course a nice new Gates cogged belt. You may need a motor, but in the end have a better drill than you can buy now. Tear it all down and be sure nothing in unsalvageable before you spend any money. I assume it is an induction motor, so no brushes.

Love that "remote control"
 

mikeh74

Mike
User
Well, it's a split-head and you just about can't get that any more. Probably will need a chuck, and of course a nice new Gates cogged belt. You may need a motor, but in the end have a better drill than you can buy now. Tear it all down and be sure nothing in unsalvageable before you spend any money. I assume it is an induction motor, so no brushes.

Love that "remote control"
C9709317-2DB1-4983-8252-1337764AF243.jpeg

Yep it’s an induction motor.
I thought the remote was cool too.
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
@mikeh74 That is a "Keeper!" JMHO
Obviously it depends on how much you are into it for already...
Yes, it is a lot of work, personally I would probably ask a motor shop to look at the motor, simply because it is a Delta, I would spend $100 to get it repaired, but if it was $30- $50 I'd think long and hard...
The guys with a few pictures over at OWWM probably could guess close to what it is. but like Scott said, the split head is good, and if the pulleys run true, not too much to it, other than a TON of time...

COOL PROJECT! Let me know if you DON'T choose to do it!
 

pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
Repulsion-Induction motors have brushes so that is something to check. Odd application since R-I motors are used for their high starting torque like for an air compressor.
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
Three things I can advise:
1. You're gonna need lots of penetrating oil on that one.
2. If you can find a 3" x 72" +- belt and a regular 3 x 24" belt sander, you can save lots of time by inverting the belt and holding it against the column to get the rust off. Did it on my floor model some years back and it worked great.
3. Don't mis-align the belt like that. The belt should be parallel to the pulleys so either the motor side needs to go up or the or the quill side needs to go down, else you'll wear out the belt real quick.

Can't wait to see it in action. I often enjoy getting something like this going again better that flashing plastic for new stuff.
 

kelLOGg

Bob
Senior User
I share my shop with a friend and he has a drill press exactly like that one. He bought it at Habitat and it works but the table, being w/o a crank, makes it a bear to use. When you refurbish it I recommend rigging up a way to raise/lower the table.
 

mikeh74

Mike
User
Thanks everyone for the advise.

I’m considering taking it a part and blasting the pieces I’m going to paint unless one thinks this is a bad idea. I’ve never blasted cast iron before.
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
Thanks everyone for the advise.

I’m considering taking it a part and blasting the pieces I’m going to paint unless one thinks this is a bad idea. I’ve never blasted cast iron before.
That is a good idea, but I would hand sand the post you want it smooth, to move the table up and down.
These are REALLY good for rust removal (by hand): Search
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
I think he was looking at this:
1622810020802.png


But wondering if these are casting numbers as you point out the DP3 and the DP280... but someone over at OWWM will chime in...
 

marinosr

Richard
Senior User
A lovely drill press, should clean up nicely if you have a media blaster!

R-I motors are nice, if finnicky. Does the shaft spin freely by hand? If not, new bearings are in order. If so, there are a few simple things to try... There should be a little adjustment slider-indicator if you pop open the hood in the back of the motor. That controls how out-of-phase the brushed starter system is w.r.t. the main winding. Moving the little sliding piece will shift the "brushes" (little graphite blocks) left and right on the rotating part of the motor. That doesn't have to mean anything to you, but the take-home message is if you move it more toward the left or right, it increases the starting torque of the motor but makes for a rougher start. I'd try playing with moving that a bit left and right and seeing if it will start. Don't leave it on for more than a second if it doesn't start, though.

Check to make sure that the teeth on both the rack and pinion of the quill and handle are in good shape... those are the wear parts and can determine if the DP will be serviceable. Oftentimes, if the rack and pinion are worn enough in matching locations that they don't work anymore, you can just rotate the pinion 1/4 turn. The fact that you're now meshing different teeth means that the wear points no longer align and you get useful service again.
 

mikeh74

Mike
User
A lovely drill press, should clean up nicely if you have a media blaster!

R-I motors are nice, if finnicky. Does the shaft spin freely by hand? If not, new bearings are in order. If so, there are a few simple things to try... There should be a little adjustment slider-indicator if you pop open the hood in the back of the motor. That controls how out-of-phase the brushed starter system is w.r.t. the main winding. Moving the little sliding piece will shift the "brushes" (little graphite blocks) left and right on the rotating part of the motor. That doesn't have to mean anything to you, but the take-home message is if you move it more toward the left or right, it increases the starting torque of the motor but makes for a rougher start. I'd try playing with moving that a bit left and right and seeing if it will start. Don't leave it on for more than a second if it doesn't start, though.

Check to make sure that the teeth on both the rack and pinion of the quill and handle are in good shape... those are the wear parts and can determine if the DP will be serviceable. Oftentimes, if the rack and pinion are worn enough in matching locations that they don't work anymore, you can just rotate the pinion 1/4 turn. The fact that you're now meshing different teeth means that the wear points no longer align and you get useful service again.
The shaft does spin freely by hand. I'll try your recommendations when I get more into it. Thanks for the advise.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
The DP-220 is a 14" drill press. This is an 11" drill press with a 1-7/8" column. It can be restored to a very accurate and quiet drill press. Replacing the sleeve bearings is an annoyance because of one dimension being rather non-standard. Not impossible to find, just its rare enough that finding one is annoying. Delta's 11-072/11-280 will share the same head parts that might be easier to find.
 

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