Does it really replace?

tvrgeek

Scott
User
I have a WEN spindle sander and a HF disk sander. Use them all the time. But the disk has the limitation of not allowing long edge tuning as the disk is flat. Yes, I know that's what planes are for, but not for of materials like plastics, phenolic or even MDF. Neither could do sanding on a bevel without a jig.

So I bought one of the Ridgid combo machines, belt/spindle jobbers as they are now available again. Only thing I notice right off is the tilt table is a long way from the spindle. Other than that, maybe nifty.

So here is my question: Does this machine really replace a disk sander and a spindle sander? I am space limited so can't really keep all three. Disk does have a BIG honking inductive motor on it.
 

RickR

Rick
Senior User
A problem I have is that the belt motion is parallel to the table and smaller workpieces tend to get pulled from my grip if I am not very careful. The disc sanders motion is perpendicular to the table so not an issue. Also, as you mention, the table hinge leaves a sizable gap that is problematic for small parts. Otherwise I find the combo quite suitable.
 

pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
As Rick just noted, this machine does tend to rip items from your hand with vigor. I made this simple removable stop which helps quite a bit.
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Last edited:

mkepke

Mark
Senior User
It replaces a (small) spindle sander, but not a disk sander. If you need to sand with precision up to a line, or need a precise bevel you'll have to go back to the disk sander (IME).

-Mark
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
Much thanks. I won't off anything until I have used it a bunch. That stop makes perfect sense. I see it uses a standard miter slot, but not a "T" and of course both my small miter gauges have the disk in them.
 

wolfsburged

Bill
Corporate Member
I bought the WEN version spindle/belt sander because I needed a spindle sander and the combo unit was only a little bit more $ than the plain spindle sander. Already have a 6x48 belt sander with a 9" disc sander.

I like the combo unit for spindle sanding. I kind of like it for the belt, in that it is much easier and faster to swap belts on it than the big belt sander. However I much prefer sanding on the big belt sander where motion is consistently down into the table, rather than sideways. As noted, it is easy to lose hold of a piece and have it go flying. The little metal stop is a bit small and awkward, but better than nothing.

I really don't use the disc sander I have. In fact I removed the table for space and haven't had a sanding disc on it for a few years. Hate hassling with changing the sand paper on it.
 

sawman101

Bruce Swanson
Corporate Member
I bought the Ridgid combo unit and was planning to replace 2 sanding machines but kept the Delta combo belt/disk sander, while I did sell the Delta B.O.S.S. Spindle machine. I also use the HF 12" disk sander, Delta 1'x42" belt/disk unit, and a pump sander unit with 3"x12" and 6"x12" inflatable drums, and a 24" surface sander. Because there is a lot of work to sanding and surface preparation, these machines all work together along with everything else in the shop to produce desirable pieces. Think awhile before eliminating any of your sanding machines, you may find the addition of a new machine a big plus, but the elimination of one could be a negative.
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
If I only had the space...

Used the new machine today. Seems to work. Smoothing the platform cutout for a WorkSharp machine/base.
 

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