Cutting cinder block?

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CrealBilly

Jeff
Senior User
I need to cut just a few 8" wide cinder blocks on a building that's already standing. Do they make a Reciprocating Saw Blade for this? I really only need to cut the sides and take out a few blocks for a chicken door. I can sledge hammer the blocks out of the wall once I got them cut.
 

golfdad

Co-director of Outreach
Dirk
Corporate Member
No Jeff. If its only a few you can use a skill saw with a diamond blade. If you have more time and less money buy a masonry carborundum blade for masonry which they should have at a big box store .If the block are old and a bit "soft" a hammer works well. Just take the face of block off from both sides
 

McRabbet

Rob
Corporate Member
I'd use my 4-1/2" Dewalt Angle Grinder with a masonry cutting disk. They are as thin as 1/8" and will cut block easily. Be sure to wear Safety goggles and ear protection, plus a dust mask -- dirty job! After making the initial cuts, go to work with a mason's chisel and hand sledge.

I just used my AG with metal cutoff disk to cut 1-3/4" thin wall steel tubing on some cattle gates (from Tractor Supply) that I am converting to use as railings on a raised sidewalk leading to my basement shop. Sure was easier than a hacksaw or even a demolition saw with metal cutting blades.
 

Lowlander

New User
Chris
+1 on the circular saw with diamond blade. They do have reciprocating saw mason blades, but they are double the price and I find they do not cut very well. I would definitely wear a quality dust mask while cutting, I always cringe when I see construction workers slicing up concrete with no respiratory gear, good for the lungs, not...
 

petebucy4638

Pete
Senior User
Cutting concrete block is not all that hard to do. Saws produce a lot of dust and produce a cleaner cut. An electric rotary hammer drill can make short work of CMU's. A good bit can cut through block like it is butter.

Pete
 

walnutjerry

Jerry
Senior User
I need to cut just a few 8" wide cinder blocks on a building that's already standing. Do they make a Reciprocating Saw Blade for this? I really only need to cut the sides and take out a few blocks for a chicken door. I can sledge hammer the blocks out of the wall once I got them cut.
If the location of the door allows, make the vertical cuts 4" from the end of the block and you will be cutting in the "cell" of the block rather than hitting the cross web of the block. The thickness within the cell will be about 1" thick. However that may not hold true on some of the older block with a different configuration of "cells". Most of the block I worked with only had 2 cells.

Jerry

PS If you are using a diamond blade you can saturate the block with water before cutting----that reduces the dust like wet blade saws used in the masonry industry. I think you would need to use the shroud on a side grinder to prevent water or wet material being slung into the openings of the grinder.
 
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CrealBilly

Jeff
Senior User
If the location of the door allows, make the vertical cuts 4" from the end of the block and you will be cutting in the "cell" of the block rather than hitting the cross web of the block. The thickness within the cell will be about 1" thick. However that may not hold true on some of the older block with a different configuration of "cells". Most of the block I worked with only had 2 cells.

Jerry

PS If you are using a diamond blade you can saturate the block with water before cutting----that reduces the dust like wet blade saws used in the masonry industry. I think you would need to use the shroud on a side grinder to prevent water or wet material being slung into the openings of the grinder.
These are old block but still have the 2 cell configuration. So its really not as bad as it seems... I need to cut at least 3 rows of block to make headroom for the turkeys.
 

cpw

New User
Charles
I'd use my 4-1/2" Dewalt Angle Grinder with a masonry cutting disk. They are as thin as 1/8" and will cut block easily. Be sure to wear Safety goggles and ear protection, plus a dust mask -- dirty job! After making the initial cuts, go to work with a mason's chisel and hand sledge.
I've done the same with my Makita 4" grinder.
 

golfdad

Co-director of Outreach
Dirk
Corporate Member
Yes a 4 1/2 " grinder wkrks very good.Just score both sides and its easy to knock out. Hold a wet sponge against the blade and you will have no dust
 

CaptnA

Andy
Corporate Member
I bought a pawnshop circular saw for $4 and a masonry blade for $2. Wasn't willing to put the masonry dust through one of my saws. Cut over 20 block and at least as many pavers so far and still going. A LITTLE stream of water helps keep the dust down.
 
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junquecol

Bruce
User
We use 4" or 4 1/2" angle grinder to cut block in place. As others said, a stream of water from garden sprayer will help keep dust down. A fan at your back will blow it away when dry cutting. Use the diamond blades, they last longer.
 
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