craftsman 113 table saw motor?

aircooled

Newb
User
I've just picked up an almost free Craftsman Table saw. I haven't found a model number on it yet but doing a google image search looks like it's a model 113.29903. Its bone stock with the exception of the motor. The last owner thought the motor was bad so he replaced it with what looks like a 1/3 hp washing machine motor. He was unable to get the motor pulley mounted correctly and gave up - that's how I got it. Since the original motor was ~1 hp I'm guessing that a 1/3 hp probably isn't going to work all that well and I don't want to spend the time rigging up a motor pulley when I know the motor is no bueno. I know this is a pretty common saw so was wondering if anyone on here has ever replaced their motor and what frame size, voltage, and hp they used? I'm probably not going to buy new if I can help it since it looks like most motors will exceed the resale value of the saw - I see newer versions of these saws for sale a lot in the sub $200 dollar range.

It's also got the stock fence on it, which is think will be the second thing I replace.

Pics to follow
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
The original motor was a NEMA 56, ODP (open drip proof) 3450 RPM, sleeve bearings. The 1.0 HP was an overly generous rating.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
I swapped mine out on my Craftsman for a 2hp Baldor. IT is a nema 56 housing just make sure you get the bolt configuration 56G , 56E, they are all a little different on the attaching bracket, or you can adapt.

One last thing, to check real hp, use volts x amps ÷ 746 = hp output
true hp is hp x efficiency of 90% average or, 1 x .90 = .9 hp

1.0 hp is 120v/7.5-8+/- amps
1.5 hp is 120v/11.5 +/- amps
2.0 hp is 120/14-15 +/- amps
 

aircooled

Newb
User
top done.jpg

And a finished photo of the top. Note the 1/3hp washing machine motor that came with the saw. I've discovered that a free tablesaw is much like a "free" puppy...there's no such thing.
 

aircooled

Newb
User
harbor freight motor.jpg

Here's my 220v 3Hp Harbor Freight replacement motor (its a little bigger than that 1/3hp motor) Using the 20% coupon is was ~$130 bucks. Its an ODP motor and I'd like to replace it at some point in the future with a sealed Baldor or similar if one ever comes up on Marketplace or Craigslist.
 

aircooled

Newb
User
test fit.jpg

Here's the motor mocked up (note the wirenuts) to verify clearances. I also added a new link belt.
pulleys.jpg

And replaced the existing pulleys with some nice ones from McMaster Carr.
 

Charles Lent

Charley
Corporate Member
I know that you are still working on this, but don't leave the wiring exposed. Put it in the box and replace the cover. Wire nut connections are not a good idea when used on vibrating machinery. The vibrations loosen them and they fall off, possibly causing short circuits or failed motors. Go with crimped splices or ring terminals and short bolts, and then tape over them with rubber, then plastic tape.

I hope you get good service out of that saw. Congratulations on finding a motor at a reasonable price and I hope it survives. I don't have very good luck with electric powered equipment from Harbor Freight and have stopped buying them.

Charley
 

aircooled

Newb
User
I know that you are still working on this, but don't leave the wiring exposed. Put it in the box and replace the cover. Wire nut connections are not a good idea when used on vibrating machinery. The vibrations loosen them and they fall off, possibly causing short circuits or failed motors. Go with crimped splices or ring terminals and short bolts, and then tape over them with rubber, then plastic tape.

I hope you get good service out of that saw. Congratulations on finding a motor at a reasonable price and I hope it survives. I don't have very good luck with electric powered equipment from Harbor Freight and have stopped buying them.

Charley
front view.jpg

Thanks for the tips Charlie. Those connections are all sorted now, at the time I was waiting for my new paddle stop switch (~$12) to show up from Amazon. Here it is, installed. Also, I bought a couple 6" cast iron hand cranks from ebay (~$25 delivered) to replace the original plastic 5" cranks. Just need to get a hold of an upgraded fence and I think I'll call it done.
 

kelLOGg

Bob
Senior User
air-cooled,
I have a Craftsman table saw with almost identical no. 113.29943
A neighbor gave it to me and it had no motor. I put a Datyon 1.5 HP 220 VAC 3500 rpm 220 VAC TEFC motor on it (maybe 30 years ago) and the motor and saw have given me no trouble except for replacing the fence and hand crank for the blade angle adjustment.
 

Charles Lent

Charley
Corporate Member
With air cooled motors on woodworking tools, you just need to use compressed air to blow out the sawdust every once in a while. A sealed motor is better, but air cooled can be used if you maintain them. A table saw that I owned 3 saws ago had a 1 1/2 hp air cooled motor and the motor served me well for over 20 years. I just had to remember to blow it out about 2 times a year. The motor far outlasted the saw. I think I still have it somewhere. It's just waiting for it's next job.

Charley
 

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