Cracked Husky

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William Roscoe

New User
William
I noticed my chainsaw was leaving a little gas on whatever I sit it on. I looked a little closer and noticed it had a small crack on the bottom of the orange plastic gas tank. If I lay it on the side and it has less than 1/2 a tank of gas, it doesn't leak. Anyone ever successfully patch a crack like that and if so, what did you use??
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I had a leak on a weed eater once, tried a couple times to fix it and finally bought a new tank. Save yourself some trouble go ahead and get the new tank.
 

William Roscoe

New User
William
The way a husky chain saw is made, you would be replacing most of the saw, including the handle if you replace the tank.
 

novice99

New User
Mike
I have had good luck in the past with putty epoxy for small leaks. Cut off a bit of the epoxy from the stick, work it together for several minutes, then while it is still quite soft apply it with some pressure to push some of the epoxy into the crack then let it cure. The epoxy won't be bothered by gas or oil once it is set. Now if you don't like the 'patchwork' look on your chain saw, replacing the tank is a breeze as well. Good Luck and have fun!
 

jerrye

Jerry
Corporate Member
Repaired the windshield washer tank in a car with epoxy; also fixed a cracked taillight lens for a friend using the same. Make sure the patch area of the tank is clean, and it wouldn't hurt to scuff it up a bit. You don't have to have a thick bead of it either. IMNSHO it's worth a try.
 

allisnut

Adam
Corporate Member
What model Husqvarna is it? On some, the fuel tank is part of the handle. This has been on craigslist for a while, I don't know if this will help you or not.

To work in a stealth gloat, I was recently given a 455 Rancher with oiling problems. Looks like I'll have $75 in it for a clutch, bar & chain.

Adam

http://tricities.craigslist.org/tls/3372136924.html
 

petebucy4638

New User
Pete
JB Weld and similar epoxy products can work wonders. The most important part is to prep for the patch. Make sure that the area being patches has been cleaned so that there is nothing on the surface to impede the bond. You can also buy a epoxy putty in the plumbing department of most box box stores. I know that it sticks great to PVC and ABS.

I noticed my chainsaw was leaving a little gas on whatever I sit it on. I looked a little closer and noticed it had a small crack on the bottom of the orange plastic gas tank. If I lay it on the side and it has less than 1/2 a tank of gas, it doesn't leak. Anyone ever successfully patch a crack like that and if so, what did you use??
 

woodworker2000

Christopher
Corporate Member
I've never understood that logic. I should buy a more robust tool than I need just in case something breaks on a "lesser" model? Stihl's never break? I've owned a Poulan chainsaw for about 15 years and used it quite heavily the first several years clearing land around my previous home but haven't used it much since. I've never had any problems with it and it has done everything I've needed it to do. I think I paid $125 for it new. I didn't need a Stihl and saved money by not buying one. I could provide similar stories about other tools I've purchased (some of them even HF tools).

To the OP, I would try fixing it with epoxy (they make special epoxy that is resistant to fuel which should be available at Autozone, Advance Auto or the like). If it doesn't work, then I would consider looking for a replacement fuel tank. On eBay, you might find the part used or find a non-working saw and strip the fuel tank from it.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
No, it's just that the Stihl is (in my opinion) a better design and more easily repaired for less expense.

but, I did work mine very hard for a solid 15 years with minimal maintenance. Just recently replaced it with a new one.
 

woodworker2000

Christopher
Corporate Member
No, it's just that the Stihl is (in my opinion) a better design and more easily repaired for less expense.

but, I did work mine very hard for a solid 15 years with minimal maintenance. Just recently replaced it with a new one.
I'm glad you had a good experience with your saw and seem to be pleased with the purchase; however, your original comment wasn't at all helpful to the question asked by the OP. The question wasn't "Hey, I'm looking for a new chainsaw, anyone have any suggestions?". Instead, the OP asked how he can fix his leaking gas tank. Your original comment was kind of in his face by suggesting that perhaps he should have purchased a Stihl so he wouldn't be in the situation he is in.

I know I wouldn't find it at all helpful if I posted a question about, for example, fixing a Chevy truck and all of the responses I got were along the lines of "That's why I bought a Toyota". When someone is having a problem with a tool and asks for advice on how to fix it, I usually try to offer some advice on how to solve the problem (if I can). I've never found it particularly helpful to just let them know I'm not having the same problem because I bought a better/more expensive tool. To each his own, I suppose.
 

wayne

New User
wayne
I noticed my chainsaw was leaving a little gas on whatever I sit it on. I looked a little closer and noticed it had a small crack on the bottom of the orange plastic gas tank. If I lay it on the side and it has less than 1/2 a tank of gas, it doesn't leak. Anyone ever successfully patch a crack like that and if so, what did you use??

William

Once you decide on the repair material, JB weld, gas tank putty or what ever get a aerosol can of brake clean, carb cleaner, or mass air flow cleaner at the auto parts store to clean it with after draining the tank as any of these aren't going to leave a residue on the plastic to impede adhesion.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I'm glad you had a good experience with your saw and seem to be pleased with the purchase; however, your original comment wasn't at all helpful to the question asked by the OP. The question wasn't "Hey, I'm looking for a new chainsaw, anyone have any suggestions?". Instead, the OP asked how he can fix his leaking gas tank. Your original comment was kind of in his face by suggesting that perhaps he should have purchased a Stihl so he wouldn't be in the situation he is in.

I know I wouldn't find it at all helpful if I posted a question about, for example, fixing a Chevy truck and all of the responses I got were along the lines of "That's why I bought a Toyota". When someone is having a problem with a tool and asks for advice on how to fix it, I usually try to offer some advice on how to solve the problem (if I can). I've never found it particularly helpful to just let them know I'm not having the same problem because I bought a better/more expensive tool. To each his own, I suppose.

I'm sorry you have a problem with my post. It was not meant in the way you suggest and it was not my first post in this thread. I originally suggested replacing the tank. My second post was to point out a source for a replacement tank. In my experience gas tank repairs have not lasted for very long. I believe the tank will eventually need to be replaced. I was trying to help by finding an online source for the replacement tank. The original poster had already mentioned that the tank is a major part of the assembly which it is and does cost $70 which is a major repair but not half the cost of the saw. Husqvarna is a very good brand and one I would purchase if I had a good local repair shop. I also pointed out that Stihl (in my opinion) has a better design that does not require the whole body plastic to be replaced when the tank develops a leak. Which could be helpful to someone considering a new saw.

If you had read any of my 5000 other posts you would know that I always try to be helpful and try to avoid conflict. I hope I have cleared up any doubts about my intentions. Please forgive me if you still believe I am in error.
 

William Roscoe

New User
William
Lots of good ideas to try. Thanks everyone, I'll let you know what I try and how it works. As a side bar on chainsaws, I have a Husky 3120XP I bought new in 1996 and I'm having to replace the cylinder and piston assembly because I've worn it out. A "husky" assembly was $360 but an after market assembly is $120. I'm hoping it will all fit like the salesperson says. I'll keep you posted on that, too.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
Lots of good ideas to try. Thanks everyone, I'll let you know what I try and how it works. As a side bar on chainsaws, I have a Husky 3120XP I bought new in 1996 and I'm having to replace the cylinder and piston assembly because I've worn it out. A "husky" assembly was $360 but an after market assembly is $120. I'm hoping it will all fit like the salesperson says. I'll keep you posted on that, too.
+1 to the suggestions posted above. Your call. :dontknow:

I had a similar experience with a heavily used Husky professional grade workhorse that was about 28 years old and well maintained with minimum $ over the years. The muffler bolts had loosened and worn away the threads on the aluminum upper cylinder head. Well, the upper and lower units were only available as a tandem single unit for about $280. A 28 year old saw can quickly become a money pit.

So I bought a new Husky 455 Rancher in 2011 for $399. Time will tell if it is of the same quality as the ones built 30 years ago.
 

woodworker2000

Christopher
Corporate Member
William-

I know this is an older thread but I came across these deals on Husky chainsaws and thought I would pass them along:



Also, for anyone in the market for a backpack blower, I have this one and can highly recommend it:

Leaf Blowers
 
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