Cork vs rubber ratio for vise jaw liner

Scott H

Scott
User
I've got an assortment of cork/rubber gasket material for vise liner from different sources. I'm noticing the percentage of cork vs rubber seems to vary. Does anyone know if this has any impact at all on suitability for vise jaw liner?

Reason I'm asking is the top roll I bought a bulk supply of but it seems almost more rubber than cork compared to what I am used to seeing, it also seems like there are more flaws (crevices) in the rubber part in it than the fel-pro gasket material I am used to. Other than that though I like that it does not have blue paint on one side that bleeds off in contact with water or alcohol.
 

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Scott H

Scott
User
I have not found any material that outperforms the Fel-Pro cork rubber gasket material. As to the blue lettering, I always glue that side thus never have a transfer concern.

Thanks, that's about what I figured. I have been buying Fel-pro based on your previous recommendations in general.

Have you found you need had to take off/replace cork/rubber liner occasionally? I had to take off some recently because I screwed up the process of gluing it on (got a big bubble of glue that wouldn't go flat under the liner.) The blue generally does not transfer to wood as easily as I had worried, but some of the hot water I was using to release the hide glue collected into a concentrated run and that did discolor the end grain of my leg vise just enough it bothers me. Kind of a worst case scenario situation. I was hoping maybe to save myself that concern down the road.
 

pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
Thanks, that's about what I figured. I have been buying Fel-pro based on your previous recommendations in general.

Have you found you need had to take off/replace cork/rubber liner occasionally? I had to take off some recently because I screwed up the process of gluing it on (got a big bubble of glue that wouldn't go flat under the liner.) The blue generally does not transfer to wood as easily as I had worried, but some of the hot water I was using to release the hide glue collected into a concentrated run and that did discolor the end grain of my leg vise just enough it bothers me. Kind of a worst case scenario situation. I was hoping maybe to save myself that concern down the road.

When replacing the crubber, I usually use a heat gun to soften the hide glue so there is little mess. And a bit of hide glue residue doesn’t much matter. When installing, I do wrap a scrap board with wax paper and clamp that overnight.

Next time that I change the crubber on my duty vise, I plan on using one each 1/16” and 1/8” for the liner pair as a durability test. Which thickness works better for you?
 
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Scott H

Scott
User
When replacing the crubber, I usually use a heat gun to soften the hide glue so there is little mess. And a bit of hide glue residue doesn’t much matter.

Next time that I change the crubber on my duty vise, I plan on using one each 1/16” and 1/8” for the liner pair as a durability test. Which thickness works better for you?

Thanks, maybe I will do a test of the heat gun, I am still getting used to hide glue. Do you still have to sprinkle water on it?

I am going with 1/16" for this project but I don't have enough experience to say if it's better or worse than 1/8". I know I am picking 1/16" for the lining on the workbench leg where the leg vise is, because I figure that is going to keep the front edge of the workbench closer to flat.
 

pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
Thanks, maybe I will do a test of the heat gun, I am still getting used to hide glue. Do you still have to sprinkle water on it?

I am relatively new to hide glue also. I have used a wet rag to clean off residue. Generally,, I find that heat and a putty knife is enough to get the old off.

BTW, the only other adhesive that has worked well for me is 3M spray contact adhesive. That residue I clean with acetone.
 

Scott H

Scott
User
I am relatively new to hide glue also. I have used a wet rag to clean off residue. Generally,, I find that heat and a putty knife is enough to get the old off.

BTW, the only other adhesive that has worked well for me is 3M spray contact adhesive. That residue I clean with acetone.

I'm gluing up a test block, I'll see how that does tomorrow with a heat gun.

I have super 77, is that in the same ballpark? I was going with hide glue to start because I didn't really want to deal with masking off the workbench/overspray.
 

pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
Sometimes I will leave overnight a heavy object (like another vise) that hangs over one side of my duty vise. In the past liners glued with 77 or liquid hide glue (in a bottle) are wrinkled the next morning. Both high gram hot hide glue and 90 do not creep. Presumably, brush-on contact cement would be OK but I have not tried it.
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Scott H

Scott
User
I glued some cork to a block of wood, let it dry overnight, and the heat gun and putty knife did a great job. The liner even came off in one piece. The bits of blue paint that stuck to the wood came off with a card scraper with basically no effort. Didn't have to use water at all. Thank you for the tip, I think I can get these vises lined from here.
 

Scott H

Scott
User
Pics of the liner on the leg vise moving jaw in case anyone is interested. This is the leg vise that @pop-pop helped me finalize the design on a while back, it has a huge bearing as a screw support so the screw is always level and square and the pinboard articulates via a pin through the bottom of the moving jaw. That is, the jaw's weight is supported entirely by the screw.
 

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pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
Pics of the liner on the leg vise moving jaw in case anyone is interested. This is the leg vise that @pop-pop helped me finalize the design on a while back, it has a huge bearing as a screw support so the screw is always level and square and the pinboard articulates via a pin through the bottom of the moving jaw. That is, the jaw's weight is supported entirely by the screw.
I’ve dubbed that design “hanging chop”. It should work smoothly nearly forever. Another plus is the fit of the parallel guide doesn’t matter as long as there are no binds.

Your small chamfer on the edges of the jaw liner will help prevent the edges from crumbling. BTW, the chamfer can be easily added with just a sanding block.
 

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