Corian Sink

Ptofimpact

Pete
User
Reading articles about resurfacing an under counter mount Corian sink. Understand the process, curious if anyone here has tried it. Article suggests first using 120, then 180 grit sandpaper[Hook and Loop 5" ROS discs]
Then Non Woven Pads 280-400-600 grit.
 

Graywolf

Richard
Corporate Member
When I worked fabricating solid surface we would get called to remove pot marks and scratches from sinks and tops all of the time. The bottom line is you are sanding down the surface and then bringing it up to a level of polish. This is dusty process and I suggest you have a dust extraction attached to your sander. I also suggest you wear dust protection, and even then you will need to clean up a lot. The materials on your list are what I used in the day. The process haven't changed much over the years.
 
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Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
I have done Corian ....... it is a dusty process. We 1st hogged down with 220 or 280 grit. Then to 400-600, then to polish diamond grit polishing pads and polishing compound, then kind you would use for stone. Be advised, the material is not that hard and you can take too much off if you are not careful. Make sure not to swale out a gouge in it. Use a existing piece to compare the finish so you match as close as possible.
 

Ptofimpact

Pete
User
Thanks Guys, have to find the non woven pads, then on with it. I have a dust port on the ROS, and facemask, appreciate the advice
 

walnutjerry

Jerry
Senior User
I have not done this but we have Corian counter tops . Those fine scratches appeared pretty soon after installation and will show up again if resurfaced by sanding so why bother? Not trying to be critical just curious.
 

Graywolf

Richard
Corporate Member
Thanks Guys, have to find the non woven pads, then on with it. I have a dust port on the ROS, and facemask, appreciate the advice
Pete, you can order them from Klingspor online. They make them, I'd start with the maroon and the gray then move to the white.
 

Ptofimpact

Pete
User
Thanks Graywolf, will take a look.
WalnutJerry, its the Sink, white, faded, some cracks, have done the Scouring by hand with Comet, but needs more
 

RayH

Ray
Corporate Member
Probably not enough for "resurfacing", but we have found Barkeeps Friend to be great for maintaining Corian sinks and countertops. It seems to be mildly abrasive so it takes care of small scratches on the surface and giving a consistent soft appearance. We have used it for years. Pick it up at the grocery store.
Good luck,
Ray
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Vice President
Hank
Corporate Member
@Oka and @Graywolf -
What about the bowl - I am thinking the "convex-ness" of this shape would be hard to bring back?

My wife wants to "RIP-OUT that DAMN Corian" in the bathroom and replace it with Granite - I almost didn't tell her there is a way to repair the sink tops because I think I would like granite (or granite-like) product better...
 

Graywolf

Richard
Corporate Member
@Oka and @Graywolf -
What about the bowl - I am thinking the "convex-ness" of this shape would be hard to bring back?

My wife wants to "RIP-OUT that DAMN Corian" in the bathroom and replace it with Granite - I almost didn't tell her there is a way to repair the sink tops because I think I would like granite (or granite-like) product better...
I'll be frank, a small say 5" sander with a thick pad can get into the curves of the sink. With that stated if the scratches are deep you would need to do a color match backfil patch on the sink and then sand the surface level. This by no means is guaranteed that it'll match in color after that much time.

So to truly answer your question, make your wife happy as well as yourself and RIP-OUT that DAMN Corian. You will enjoy the stone much better.
 

Ptofimpact

Pete
User
LoL Rip it Out. I have an Under Sink mount, Glued, read it must be removed with some Router gadget, they charge 1000+ to do so
I appreciate All the great Input, this site is my Handyman magazine, thanks guys...back to searching for non woven pads, not in packs of 20-50
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
@Hmerkle Graywolf is right it is repairable ............... BUT .........to me it is too much work. It is usually cheaper to buy an entire vanity top/ cabinet with a sink and install that than it fixing the Corian bowl. Also, if it is one of the knock off type "Corian" material - they are way more brittle not a true Corian
and you could break it.

If the resin type bowl is desired for the look then, look at some of the higher end type brands they are hard and quite pretty. If stone is the look, then granite is best. Be advised when using stone, in the winter the surface can be very cold to the touch.

Stay away from marble, way too soft really only good for walls unless you like the scratchy look :D


@Oka and @Graywolf -
What about the bowl - I am thinking the "convex-ness" of this shape would be hard to bring back?

My wife wants to "RIP-OUT that DAMN Corian" in the bathroom and replace it with Granite - I almost didn't tell her there is a way to repair the sink tops because I think I would like granite (or granite-like) product better...
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Vice President
Hank
Corporate Member
I'll be frank, a small say 5" sander with a thick pad can get into the curves of the sink. With that stated if the scratches are deep you would need to do a color match backfil patch on the sink and then sand the surface level. This by no means is guaranteed that it'll match in color after that much time.

So to truly answer your question, make your wife happy as well as yourself and RIP-OUT that DAMN Corian. You will enjoy the stone much better.
ANND the short answer is: "make your wife happy" because... well most of us get that...
 

Ptofimpact

Pete
User
Finished the Sink, found a pack of sanding discs on Amazon, 240 to 1000, 60 pcs for 9.99 Spent about 3 hrs, double sink. Used 240 thru 400. The discs do not last too long, but did the job. Appreciate all the good advice..now looking for a Sealer for sink, cleaner/polishing for countertops
 

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