Can someone tell me what this is from?

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
I found this inside a house we were about to demolish in CLT last Thursday. I can't recall having seen a plane big enough to hold this beast.
IMG_0188.JPG
 

McRabbet

Rob
Corporate Member
Wow, that is nearly an inch wider than the blade in a #8 Stanley, their widest plane iron (it is 2-5/8" wide). Are there any markings on the blade?
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
Possibly an old, custom made, wooden body plane. If the plane doesn't have any markings on it, or none from one of the traditional plane making companies, then it is probably shop made.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
WOW, the members on this site have an enormous wealth of information
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
That's why I bring my questions here. BTW, there was no plane body to be found, just the iron. I feel like if it had been in a wood body plane there would have been no need for the slot. I'll look closer for markings.
All I know is you gotta make a lotta effort to push that much iron through a piece of wood, even for a thin pass.
 

beloitdavisja

James
Corporate Member
All I know is you gotta make a lotta effort to push that much iron through a piece of wood, even for a thin pass.
Better make it scary-sharp! Reminds me of those hand plane competitions in Japan where you can find irons much wider than this.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
Yeah pretty sure thos planes would not plane curly grain exotics as easily as that Fir they were planing, Still pretty awesome none the less


That's why I bring my questions here. BTW, there was no plane body to be found, just the iron. I feel like if it had been in a wood body plane there would have been no need for the slot. I'll look closer for markings.
All I know is you gotta make a lotta effort to push that much iron through a piece of wood, even for a thin pass.
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
May have been from one of those long planing boards barrel makers used to shape the staves. They were basically a long (6' ?) wood-bodied plane propped "upside down" at an incline with the toe on the bench. The stave edges were then dragged over the plane instead of the plane being pushed over the work. Due to the curve, it took a wide blade and long body to true the edge for a full sized barrel. Just a guess.
 

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