Cabinet Door Stops

Ralrick

Rick
Corporate Member
I built a rolling dartboard cabinet for a friend to use outdoors. Because of the cabinet design without a face frame and full overlay doors, I ended up just using regular no-mortise hinges as the doors need to open a full 180* with the scoreboards mounted to the inside of the doors.

The problem there is nothing to hold the doors open nor anything to hold them in place once opened. I was thinking of having something mounted on the top and bottom inside the cabinet door that would have a wooden piece slide through a clearance hole through the side of the cabinet (think of a gate sliding gate latch) and then using a magnet system to hold the door to the slide. Any better thoughts on how to accomplish?

Wish I was better with sketch up as a picture would be worth 1000 words to show what I described but hopefully someone followed along and has some ideas.
 

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Michael Mathews

Michael
Corporate Member
what about creating a small sliding wooden latch, like a wooden deadbolt, and mounting in in the lower or upper, say left of the right door where when the door is open, you slide it to lock against the case frame so the door won't close? You could create a nice wooden latch. It wouldn't have to be a sliding latch, it could be a rotary latch that could rotate from the vertical position to the horizontal position to where it blocks the door from closing. Make sense? If not, I can sketch a quick pic...
 

Ralrick

Rick
Corporate Member
what about creating a small sliding wooden latch, like a wooden deadbolt, and mounting in in the lower or upper, say left of the right door where when the door is open, you slide it to lock against the case frame so the door won't close? You could create a nice wooden latch. It wouldn't have to be a sliding latch, it could be a rotary latch that could rotate from the vertical position to the horizontal position to where it blocks the door from closing. Make sense? If not, I can sketch a quick pic...
Thanks Michael. I think that is the reverse of what I had been thinking about with the latch attached to the inside of the cabinet rather than on the door. This way may be an easier install for sure.

Rick
 

tvrgeek

tvrgeek
User
Old school is just a chain or hook-latch between the door fronts and side pieces. Fancy was to use a small cannon ball on a chain to a post like garden gates.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Old school is just a chain or hook-latch between the door fronts and side pieces. Fancy was to use a small cannon ball on a chain to a post like garden gates.
Bought any cannon balls lately? Did a job once in a Williamsburg style building that had a cannon ball gate closer. Hardware vendor was scratching head try to locate one. Went down the street to sporting goods store and bought the smallest shot put they had, then drilled and tapped it for a screws eye. Installed it just before final inspection. Next morning, guess what was GONE .
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
Sliding hinge or lid support? I’ve seen some with thumb screws.

Flipper door hinges are also nice.
 

JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
Just screw a 1"x1"x3" piece to the door with one screw, toggle it with the door open so it's flat against the face frame.
 

McRabbet

Rob
Corporate Member
Here's a clever solution: cut out a small rectangular opening at the hinge side of each door at the bottom corner and make a corresponding opening in the case side, tapering the front side of the rectangular holes (mortises) at 16 degrees and make tusk tenons to fit into the holes against the back of each door panel to hold them open when the tenon is inserted. Make the tusk tenons long enough to grab easily and they can be stored in the bottom of the dartboard cabinet.

Another option would be to make the same system using drilled holes, but use a dart through the holes that press up against the door inner back panels.
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
why not just drill magnets in the case side and door side that hold the doors open?
(you can cover them with thin veneer or a thin drilled plug if the magnet would be in an unsightly spot...)
 

Ralrick

Rick
Corporate Member
Here are a couple close-up pictures for the door/case positions when opened. Not sure if the hinge stop would work since the door is free to open further than 180*.

I’m now wondering if I could drill a hole through the case side directly into the edge of the door and then slide in a pin. If I did it at top and bottom, I imagine it would be fairly secure
 

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JimD

Jim
Senior User
What about a couple screw in eyes on the doors and a bungee between them when opened a bit beyond fully open? Simple and cheap.
 

JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
I’m now wondering if I could drill a hole through the case side directly into the edge of the door and then slide in a pin. If I did it at top and bottom, I imagine it would be fairly secure
That would work. Could also fashion a "wedge" (not necessarily tapered) to fit between the door and case with a magnetic overlap over the lip of the hinge.
 

Oka

Casey
Corporate Member
What about adding a traction hinge ? not sure they have them in the no mortise configuration, but the ones I have used in the past have a cam that causes the door to have resistance opening or shutting, so it stays where you want it. You could (if the pins are not fixed) pull the pin and replace with a threaded bolt that is long enough to attach a small acorn screw on the bottom to create resistance.
 

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