Best glue for cork on vise?

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I bought some rubber impregnated cork sheets for lining my wood vise and now I’m second guessing the glue to use.

What do you recommend?
 

striker

Stephen
Corporate Member
Mike,
not to change the subject butI was thinking of adding the cork to my vise(s). where do you get it from?
 

gmakra

George
Senior User
I am thinking contact cement. Cork is nice but it degrades quickly and needs to be replaced.
 

Charlie Buchanan

Charlie
Corporate Member
I glued impregnated gasket material from auto parts store to my vise over a year ago. Used liquid hide glue on lightly sanded wood jaws. It has lasted fine. And it would be easy to replace if it becomes necessary.
 

mdbuntyn

Matt
Corporate Member
I've had good luck with liquid hide glue, and I think Richard uses it also. Schwarz used to use liquid hide glue, but now he uses epoxy.

@striker You can get Fel-Pro gasket material from most auto parts stores
 

pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
I first used yellow glue, spray adhesive, etc. However, I will sometimes have a vise clamped in a vise overhanging and if left overnight, the adhesive would creep from the torque and wrinkle the crubber.

Best results so far have been with 3M spray contact cement. Changing the crubber is a bit tougher though.

I recently had to renew some crubber and using a heat gun heating a putty knife worked quite well getting the old crubber off. Acetone removed the residue.
 

Oka

Casey
Corporate Member
I used 3M industrial grade Contact Cement (think it was the 1357 version). Got it from work, went on perfectly. Still there no edge failures. Get solvent type only. Prep and degrease thoroughly 1st.
 

Graywolf

Board of Directors, Vice President
Richard
Corporate Member
I’ve tried contact cement and it failed over a short time. My current set up I used hide glue and it’s held up well. Also, I’ve been using rubber impregnated cork from an automotive supply store, it’s gasket material sold by the sheet and different thicknesses. An 18x36 sheet was about 15.00
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I have some hide glue chips, haven’t used them yet. I was thinking that might be the best as far as clean up when replacing old cork. Wasn’t sure if the rubber would stick to it.

Which auto supply has sheets that big? All I have seen in my local store is very small sheets like for thermostat gaskets and such.
 

pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
Which auto supply has sheets that big? All I have seen in my local store is very small sheets like for thermostat gaskets and such.
It is available at almost all but may not be on display. You may have to ask for it.
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Melinapex

Mark
User
If I remember I think I just used some double sided tape... I figured the cork would need replaced now and then and thought the tape would make it easier..
 

Graywolf

Board of Directors, Vice President
Richard
Corporate Member
Mike, I generally go to the Napa at 68 and Gallimore Dairy. You have to ask for it. They have different thicknesses as well. I have been using 1/8”. It works well.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
So, when you epoxy cork to a wood vise jaw, how do you remove it when it’s all cut and crumbled apart? Chris probably just makes a new vise. He seems to make one a year anyway. Mine has to last the rest of my life, I’m not making another.
 

mdbuntyn

Matt
Corporate Member
I've bought 10"x26"x1/16" sheets at both the Advance Auto and O'reilly on University Pkwy., but I may be going down to Napa to get something thicker.
 
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McRabbet

Rob
Corporate Member
More than 10 years ago I bought a roll of 1/4" thick cork (42" x 12') that I used for bulletin boards in a pair of outdoor "Information Kiosks" I built for the Kellogg Center in Hendersonville. I used 3M contact cement to glue the sheets to the tempered Masonite substrate held in the frame of the door-equipped inserts. Each kiosk had bulletin board on each side protected from the elements behind Lexan doors and under roof -- they are still in place after 13 years with no sign of the cork coming unglued.

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Graywolf

Board of Directors, Vice President
Richard
Corporate Member
So, when you epoxy cork to a wood vise jaw, how do you remove it when it’s all cut and crumbled apart? Chris probably just makes a new vise. He seems to make one a year anyway. Mine has to last the rest of my life, I’m not making another.
Just stick with the glue you can reverse and clean up. It works well and lasts just fine. I tried contact adhesive and it was to soft after setting. The hide glue was just right. The crubber is a consumable and you’ll want to be able to change it easily.
 

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