Battery Powered Chainsaws

Raymond

Raymond
Corporate Member
I am interested in buying a battery powered chainsaw but am not too sure on which to buy. I will be using it to do light trim work on tree limbs, shrubs and bushes and for cutting down free wood to throw on the lathe.

I am looking at 3 different models and am asking you all what you use or prefer. I am considering: 1) Stihl AK Series 36 Volt Lithium-Ion Cordless Chainsaw; 2) Husqvarna 120i (14") 36-Volt Lithium-Ion Cordless Chainsaw; 3) 16 in. 40-Volt Brushless Lithium-Ion Cordless Chainsaw.

Let me hear your preferences.
 

walnutjerry

Jerry
Senior User
I went through the same dilemma and ended up buying a Greenworks 12V corded electric saw. Cost being one of the main reasons. Besides the initial cost of the battery operated saw I would have had to buy the charger at extra cost and later on buy replacement batteries. Since my main reason for an electric saw is to aid in working up bowl blanks I just could not justify the difference in cost for the convenience of a cordless battery saw. I also already have a gas powered chain saw for places too far away for using a drop cord. The corded saw will cut at longer intervals than a battery saw because it does not have to be recharged, thus no need to buy extra batteries to keep working. It is one of those things you have to weigh out as to how you plan on using the saw. AND at 77 years young, how much longer will I use a chainsaw anyway.
 

gritz

Robert
Senior User
I love my Stihls. I have both the battery powered and corded versions. The chain on the battery powered one is thin and I initially thought it wasn't up to the tasks. It is...in spades. One battery lasts until I need a break.
I bought both saws, 3 batteries and charger off E-Bay over about a year. I doubt my gas saw would start since I haven't used it in so long.

My tree man just took out a 120' Chestnut Oak that was sinking down the creek bank toward the house. He uses a double battery powered Husqvarna as a climbing saw. He didn't swap out batteries or change to his Stihl gas saw until the trunk was much wider than anyone would expect that little saw could cut. He said that saw is better balanced than the Stihl.
 

stevenross

steven
User
Love Greenworks 60V - started with leaf blower then over time added chain saw, pole chain saw,, hedge trimmer, weed wacker and just got cultivator. All use same battery.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
I know this is inconsistent with the question but I like my 40V Ryobi. It seems to leak bar oil, however. But it cuts well. I already had several 40V batteries and chargers and I've had pretty good luck with Ryobi battery powered tools. All the 40V work fine, mower, trimmer, leaf vacuum. I bought the Ryobi one Sunday when my neighbors tree fell across my driveway. I hadn't used my old gas saw for years and when I looked at it, the primer bulb was in pieces. I cut enough of the tree to get the car out to go to church and bought the Ryobi that afternoon. The trunk was only about 8 inches. It went through that easily. I have not had a need to cut anything thicker but I am confident it will cut trees as thick as the 14 inch bar allows. Some of the on line reviews are not great but mostly because the saw came with a small 2 amp hour battery. I only have 4s, 5s, and 6s. They work fine.

I believe battery power is just OK for lawn mowers but plenty good enough for chain saws. I think any of the ones you are looking at will also be fine. (my Ryobi mower works but needs two batteries to do my smallish yard, total mowing time about 45 minutes)
 

awldune

Sam
User
FWIW I have used the Ryobi One+ and it is surprisingly capable. Worth considering if you already have the One+ system.
 

FlyingRon

Board of Directors, Webmaster
Ron
Staff member
Corporate Member
My wife has a JawSaw that she really likes. It's impossible to kick back and you have to hold it with both hands so it's hard to be unsafe with it.
 

jerrye

Jerry
Corporate Member
FWIW I have used the Ryobi One+ and it is surprisingly capable. Worth considering if you already have the One+ system.
I have the 12" bar brushless Ryobi, and it cuts great for what it is designed to do. It is my go-to limbing saw.

I also have the Greenworks 80v 18" saw. It impresses someone every time I use it. Expensive? Yes. Worth it? Yes. No vibration; quiet enough to use without hearing protection; not as fast but just as capable as any Stihl or Husqvarna 18" saw I've used before; always starts. I also have the trimmer powerhead with several attachments, and it runs them all with aplomb.
 

Alcareyjr

New User
Al
I am interested in buying a battery powered chainsaw but am not too sure on which to buy. I will be using it to do light trim work on tree limbs, shrubs and bushes and for cutting down free wood to throw on the lathe.

I am looking at 3 different models and am asking you all what you use or prefer. I am considering: 1) Stihl AK Series 36 Volt Lithium-Ion Cordless Chainsaw; 2) Husqvarna 120i (14") 36-Volt Lithium-Ion Cordless Chainsaw; 3) 16 in. 40-Volt Brushless Lithium-Ion Cordless Chainsaw.

Let me hear your preferences.
I watched a comparison video since I'm considering a purchase for the same purposes. The take away was that they preferred Stihl, but the Husky was rated as good. I'm kind of leaning toward the Stihl also since I've always had good luck with their products.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I started life with a Wen corded 16 inch electric chainsaw, biggest thing I ever cut was a 30 inch maple up on our old farm.
Once I got it on the ground I thought about cutting it up and quickly came to the decision to buy a real saw. That was 18 years ago or more.
I'm sure the battery saws are much better than that little Wen, but it still works and I still use it.
If I had to buy an electric saw now, I would go with the Stihl.
 

Charles Lent

Charley
Corporate Member
Get the Stihl. You won't be sorry.

One of the things that kills electric chain saws quickly is to try to use them for long periods of time without giving them a rest. You can't cut steadily like you can with a gas chainsaw. I learned to cut for about a minute, and then wait 30 seconds or more with no load before cutting again. The motors get too hot when under load continuously. Running them under no load cools them back down. Either stop cutting frequently, or give them a chance to cool while running without the load, and the motor will last much longer.

Charley
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
Many years ago we had a young(er) guy working for us using a chain saw (gas). His first day at lunchtime he came to a 'brilliant' conclusion that if someone would make a backpack that acted as a fuel tank you could cut so much more wood without stopping to refuel. I held my peace on that remark. The afternoon of the second day, after the saw had run out of gas for the umpteenth time I heard him say under his breath, "Good!" There's a reason saw fuel tanks are as small as they are as far as I'm concerned. Same for battery saws. I have a DeWalt 20v that I use at home and occasionally at work, and it's a stretch to keep up with 3 chargers going. It will overheat with constant use. Having said that, if I were to use one on a regular and more frequent basis like some of you, the Stihl would be my pick.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
No experience here, but over on Woodcentral a retired arborist noted that the Makita and Husky brands were the most common in the field, and most recommended on his arborist site (treebuzz.? maybe ca).
 

tvrgeek

tvrgeek
User
I bought the 80V Lowes Kobalt. Very happy with it. Sure, not the match for my small gas Pulan, but it starts first time, no gas can in the garage etc. I happen to have a Kobalt 80V blower, so that gives me two batteries. I am down to one small gas tool, my small mower. 40 years old and starts first pull so just can't justify replacing it. Got rid of my gas string trimmer. Got the 40V pole saw and trimmer. Long reach hedge trimmer is next. So several 80 V, several 40 V.

If you are a pro and work all day, then a gas is the tool, but as a home owner with a couple acres, super handy. Small trees, deadfall, etc.

E-go and Green are the two actual big manufactures. They sell their own brands and make many others. Both NC companies!
 

TBone

TBone
Senior User
I use a 12" Kobalt 40v. It does everything I ask of it and more. Have had 3 people try it and each bought one. For anything too large for that one, I have a 41 year old Homelite XL that will do more than I want to do at my age.
 

23tony

Tony
User
I was pretty dismissive of battery powered "yard" tools some years ago, but since seeing what the newer rescue extrication tools can do, I'm more inclined to consider them now - they've definitely improved.

With the land I have, the gas-powered stuff is usually more useful, but it would be nice to have something smaller and easier to run for the quick jobs.
 

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