Air Compressor Pump

Ted P

New User
Ted
Seven years of ambient (read humid) storage appears to have significantly damaged my 5 HP Quincy compressor pump. It has huge amounts of blowby through the crankcase and doesn't build pressure very quickly. A little online research indicates that rebuild kits for piston and rings is more expensive than buying a new E-Max pump from HD (about $300) and just changing out the pump.

Any forum experience with E-Max compressors/pumps? Realistically I have no need for an industrial pump like the Quincy, but it was cheap at the time - 20 years ago....
 

gmakra

George
Senior User
Run the pump while and see if a lot of that blow by Will smooth out. The Henry sells standpoint you're better off fixing the pump you'll have a higher quality pump and you can get more money for the compressor later down the road. The new pumps that are coming out are not what they used to be
 

Pop Golden

Pop
Corporate Member
There is a new air compressor on the market, I just purchased a Kobalt from Lowes. It has a 1.8 horsepower 4-pole induction motor with two oil less pumps for quiet running (<70 dBA), 2x longer life, and less maintenance. This design uses a single motor between 3 pumps. I'm very happy with it's performance.

Pop
 

Ted P

New User
Ted
The pump is surely in need of some remedial action as is is getting worse, rather than better for blow by and pump up time. It will not even keep up with a little sandblaster that it has easily handled before storage.
I have a couple of little compressors that I am currently using for nail guns, impact wrench, etc. But a little 1-2 hp compressor does not cut it with many air tools.
When I get the pump down off the platform where the compressor resides (to save floor space) I'll evaluate and if replaced, offer the carcass to the group if valuable.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
The rings could be stuck. Remove head, shoot some PB blaster into cylinder bore, and let it soak over night. With just the head off, you will be able to see if the cylinder walls have rust on them. Next morning, replace head, drain oil and add fresh. Try it and see what happens. If this fails, take compressor apart, hone the bores, and replace both rings and reed valves. Reassemble and try it. Auto parts houses have the cylinder hone for use without charge, but you will have to pay a deposit (refundable.)
 

NCPete

Pete Davio
Corporate Member
The rings could be stuck. Remove head, shoot some PB blaster into cylinder bore, and let it soak over night. With just the head off, you will be able to see if the cylinder walls have rust on them. Next morning, replace head, drain oil and add fresh. Try it and see what happens. If this fails, take compressor apart, hone the bores, and replace both rings and reed valves. Reassemble and try it. Auto parts houses have the cylinder hone for use without charge, but you will have to pay a deposit (refundable.)
I love Bruce for these sorts of things - he is a fantastic resource when it comes to old compressors, and even some not so old.
 

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