Actual innovation and a wish list

tvrgeek

Scott
Corporate Member
Just saw a bit on a new SawStop miter gauge. Priced like one would expect from SawStop, but several actual innovative features. This is what we need: Thinking about it. Designers who actually use the tool. Probably not enough to make me give up my Lyon miter trimmer and shooting board, but better for sure.

Harvey redid their pivot cabinet saws. Multi-rib belt, full lower blade shroud, deeper table. Nothing unique, just up to par like the Jet Xacta where my old C30 is a more dated design. They include their fancy miter gauge (innovative, but not well reviewed) and the real improvement, their new roller double locking fence. If not buying a SawStop, this would look like the best choice for a table saw. OOh, Harvey fence on the SawStop!

Where we still need improvements:
Table saw dust collection. The large tube SawStop overarm is close, but needs split sides and maybe a brush to better do thin edge rips. It needs an adjustment wheel to move the tube left and right depending on the cut for push block clearence. I like the fitting for a bright light on the Shark guard. I intend to do all these mods to mine.

I am still convinced that a venturi ramp and focused high pressure dust collection below the table would work far better than the catch it if you can high volume in the current designs. My idea forces the dust from the gullet, not hope to pick up any spray that happens to leave. I believe it could catch all the dust without over-arm collection except for those half blade wide rips.

Table saws need a faster blade slow down. I think they do in the EU. Even a foot brake like on my band saw would work. Many accidents are from impatience for the blade to stop. One thing Delta got correct is moving the tilt wheel to the front. Would like to see DRO for tilt and height.

A few more things need to show up on band saws. Larger table. Some sort of quick change guide blocks so you could swap between roller and ceramic easily. Again, I think a focused air jet would be much better at dust collection than sucking air from a huge gap under the table. If someone would design a sealed bearing that actually was sealed, that would help.

Not much has changed in jointers. I think they should have a more precise fine adjustment than the wheel/lever. For sure, go to multi-rib belts.

Planers with moving heads still need work on rigidity to reduce snipe. If they moved the posts further fore and aft, that would give more leverage with the same tolerance bearings so less kick as the work meets the rollers. Moving table planers may not be as susceptible. Integrated DRO of course. Line powered so batteries are not dead every time you go to use it.

Only one drill press has moved out of the 1930's. Not only the DVR drive, but it went back to the OLD feature of a split head so you can adjust the quill play. They went too far in controller features though. I still would prefer mechanical stops. One reason I have not bought one. Delta tried to make a better woodworkers drill, but quality is so bad no one cares. Baleigh, Oliver, Rikon, Jet, Griz, Palmgren all still making the same old junk. Palmgren maybe a little better quality tolerances. I see Powermatic finally figured out they screwed up the Reeves drive so badly they went to DVR. Jet at least went multi-rib belt to reduce vibration but alas, quality of the sheaves limits it a bit. Table adjustments need to move to the front. Tilt should not be by wrench. We should have a choice of metal work or wood work tables.

First few uses with my new DeWalt fret saw. Jet to blow dust from the cut line but ZERO provisions for collection. Granted, it does not make much and does not blast it all over the room, but no attempt at all.

I would like to see a DVR on a bench grinder. One could go real slow like a Tormak, but spin it up dry like standard grinders. We need better wheel balancing as a CBN wheel is not the answer for everything.

In portable power tools we are just waiting for the next battery revolution. In most cases, we not have the performance, but battery weight and lifespan are problems. I actually want my key chucks back. Tired of spinning bits.

I saw a comment on hand saws. For a joinery rip saw, add a tiny amount of fleam. Slightly slower, but smoother cut. Just a couple degrees. I might try that on my modified budget tenon saw.
 

Wilsoncb

Williemakeit
Corporate Member
For table saws, I can’t believe more don’t have micro adjust like the Vega.
 

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tvrgeek

Scott
Corporate Member
Yea, Even my old Ridgid had a little thumbwheel to make it easer. In theory. I still found tap-a-tap to be more accurate.
I thought about a Vega fence but heard too many stories about their quality going down. My Harvey fence is pretty good after I did several modifications. I modified the scale lens to have less parallax, modified the clamp so it does not bind, added fence and tracks for feather boards and guides. Stuck on a DRO, but I never use it.

Always looking for better.
 

John Britton

John
User
Just saw a bit on a new SawStop miter gauge. Priced like one would expect from SawStop, but several actual innovative features. This is what we need: Thinking about it. Designers who actually use the tool. Probably not enough to make me give up my Lyon miter trimmer and shooting board, but better for sure.

Harvey redid their pivot cabinet saws. Multi-rib belt, full lower blade shroud, deeper table. Nothing unique, just up to par like the Jet Xacta where my old C30 is a more dated design. They include their fancy miter gauge (innovative, but not well reviewed) and the real improvement, their new roller double locking fence. If not buying a SawStop, this would look like the best choice for a table saw. OOh, Harvey fence on the SawStop!

Where we still need improvements:
Table saw dust collection. The large tube SawStop overarm is close, but needs split sides and maybe a brush to better do thin edge rips. It needs an adjustment wheel to move the tube left and right depending on the cut for push block clearence. I like the fitting for a bright light on the Shark guard. I intend to do all these mods to mine.

I am still convinced that a venturi ramp and focused high pressure dust collection below the table would work far better than the catch it if you can high volume in the current designs. My idea forces the dust from the gullet, not hope to pick up any spray that happens to leave. I believe it could catch all the dust without over-arm collection except for those half blade wide rips.

Table saws need a faster blade slow down. I think they do in the EU. Even a foot brake like on my band saw would work. Many accidents are from impatience for the blade to stop. One thing Delta got correct is moving the tilt wheel to the front. Would like to see DRO for tilt and height.

A few more things need to show up on band saws. Larger table. Some sort of quick change guide blocks so you could swap between roller and ceramic easily. Again, I think a focused air jet would be much better at dust collection than sucking air from a huge gap under the table. If someone would design a sealed bearing that actually was sealed, that would help.

Not much has changed in jointers. I think they should have a more precise fine adjustment than the wheel/lever. For sure, go to multi-rib belts.

Planers with moving heads still need work on rigidity to reduce snipe. If they moved the posts further fore and aft, that would give more leverage with the same tolerance bearings so less kick as the work meets the rollers. Moving table planers may not be as susceptible. Integrated DRO of course. Line powered so batteries are not dead every time you go to use it.

Only one drill press has moved out of the 1930's. Not only the DVR drive, but it went back to the OLD feature of a split head so you can adjust the quill play. They went too far in controller features though. I still would prefer mechanical stops. One reason I have not bought one. Delta tried to make a better woodworkers drill, but quality is so bad no one cares. Baleigh, Oliver, Rikon, Jet, Griz, Palmgren all still making the same old junk. Palmgren maybe a little better quality tolerances. I see Powermatic finally figured out they screwed up the Reeves drive so badly they went to DVR. Jet at least went multi-rib belt to reduce vibration but alas, quality of the sheaves limits it a bit. Table adjustments need to move to the front. Tilt should not be by wrench. We should have a choice of metal work or wood work tables.

First few uses with my new DeWalt fret saw. Jet to blow dust from the cut line but ZERO provisions for collection. Granted, it does not make much and does not blast it all over the room, but no attempt at all.

I would like to see a DVR on a bench grinder. One could go real slow like a Tormak, but spin it up dry like standard grinders. We need better wheel balancing as a CBN wheel is not the answer for everything.

In portable power tools we are just waiting for the next battery revolution. In most cases, we not have the performance, but battery weight and lifespan are problems. I actually want my key chucks back. Tired of spinning bits.

I saw a comment on hand saws. For a joinery rip saw, add a tiny amount of fleam. Slightly slower, but smoother cut. Just a couple degrees. I might try that on my modified budget tenon saw.
Could you describe your use of the word "fleam". I looked it up, and it refers to a blade for bloodletting, or the bloodletting process itself.
 

junquecol

Bruce
Senior User
Most everything mentioned costs $$$$$$$$! How much more is the consumer willing to pay for these things? Adding a micro adjustment to any fence is only a matter of doing it. Numerous tips in the woodworking magazines over the years on how to do this. Everything is impossible till someone does it!
 

mdbuntyn

Matt
Staff member
Corporate Member
Could you describe your use of the word "fleam". I looked it up, and it refers to a blade for bloodletting, or the bloodletting process itself.
Fleam is the knife-like bevel that's put on saw teeth to make crosscutting easier. Adding a small amount of fleam to rip saws makes them easier to use, at the expense of sawing speed (Bad Axe calls it "hybrid filing"). Whether or not that's an acceptable trade-off largely depends on your sawing skill (tooth pitch can also be a factor, but less so).

PDF of the different characteristics of saw teeth: https://toolsforworkingwood.com/prodimg/ms/pdf/MS-VAF_M.pdf
 

tvrgeek

Scott
Corporate Member

Watch the Paul Sellers You-tubes for details.

Sometimes good design costs money. Sometimes it is a wash. If you buy only for the race to the bottom price wars, then you cut every corner. But there is still a market for products that work well, even if more expensive. Notice Saw Stop is more expensive than a similar Griz, but it is by far the market leader.
 

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