A little before and after of a 14” back saw.

Graywolf

Board of Directors, President
Richard
Staff member
Corporate Member
7A4A4D52-9C7E-4235-82F0-D78E554DD22E.jpeg

it started out like this, the back was bent, the blade was warped, the tooth line was a wreck, the handle was off the shelf replacement.

057B65C0-F5D5-43FB-B604-E4E7FFDE8D32.jpeg

and now it looks like this.
 

bowman

Neal
Staff member
Corporate Member
Great work Richard. approximately how much time did you spend on the refurb?
 

Graywolf

Board of Directors, President
Richard
Staff member
Corporate Member
i worked three other saws at the same time, as far as the disassembly, cleaning, smithing, shaping, and creating a new tooth line, then bluing the back, that was about five hours. Then this one sat for a while until I had time to cut and shape a new handle. That part was about two to three hours. I have four other handles started. One will be for another 14” back saw that I’ll be restoring a little later. It’s been hanging in the shop for a year now so I need to get it going some time soon. I do have several project opportunities coming up that I’m hoping to document and post.
 

KurtB

Kurt
User
NICE! How long did it take to re-do the tooth line? I did a 10" G.H. Bishop once. Quite a task.
 

Graywolf

Board of Directors, President
Richard
Staff member
Corporate Member
NICE! How long did it take to re-do the tooth line? I did a 10" G.H. Bishop once. Quite a task.
That’s where a larger amount of the time went, the exact times are relative to when I entered the shop to start the work on the saw and when I put it down for lunch or a break. I don’t necessarily keep a clock on each task. I also run more than one saw at a time up to a point and then they become separate projects. But to give the best estimate of redoing the tooth line, jointing to straighten the tooth line, cutting and shaping the teeth, sharpening and tuning the cut finish, is about two hours give or take a little. The rough estimations of time also do not include time spent studying the saw and it’s condition, any research on its age or history. And then the decision of what I want it to be when I’m finished. Most cases I try and keep it the same points per inch as the original but I generally set up 14” saws as a rip saw and 12” saws as a cross cut. But in reality they could be set up either way. That’s one of the things I like about the old western saws is the versatility of them. You can set them up for just about anything in woodworking. When I sharpen saws for customers I set them up the way they want them. It’s all according to what they want and how much they want to spend. In most cases the biggest change if any is between a rip and a crosscut.
 

Graywolf

Board of Directors, President
Richard
Staff member
Corporate Member
NICE!
I think you "blued" the back?
Regardless - it looks REALLY nice!
Yes, I think I did blue the back. There was evidence of it having been blued originally and I like the look of it. I also have a couple others that I have done that way as well and the next one on the list will be blued as well even though there was no evidence of it. I think it’s a cool look.
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
Yes, I think I did blue the back. There was evidence of it having been blued originally and I like the look of it. I also have a couple others that I have done that way as well and the next one on the list will be blued as well even though there was no evidence of it. I think it’s a cool look.
I think the contrast in colour is what is so cool - be it brass or blued steel
 

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