Workshop Build - Recommendations?

TekTrixter

Thanos
User
I'm building a new wood shop to make small decorative boxes, custom closet organizers, and DIY projects around the house.

I already have a drill, driver, circular saw, miter saw, and other basic tools.

Please take a look at my planned purchases and let me know if I've missed anything or if there are better alternatives in the same price range:
 
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Oka

Board of Directors, Vice President
Casey
Staff member
Corporate Member
Welcome to the forum Tek. Please take time to post a about yourself posting so all of us can get to know you better.
Because the link is protected and I cannot access, might be easier to post as an image (can use snipping tool to do that). Use this when certain formats are not recognized by the forum software.
 
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TekTrixter

Thanos
User
Welcome to the forum Tek. Please take time to post a about yourself posting so all of us can get to know you better.
Because the link is protected and I cannot access, might be easier to post as an image (can use snipping tool to do that). Use this when certain formats are recognized by the forum software.
Thanks for the heads up. I've changed the permissions and the link should be viewable now. I'm also including a image of it just in case.
1663436174627.png
 

tvrgeek

Scott
Corporate Member
Big bang buy? Really, I suggest buying as needed, For instance, you will probably only use 2 or 3 router bits. So buy good Whiteside for the ones you use.
I too like CMT blades.
PEC blems are great tools at great prices.
You can get excellent rulers on Amazon dirt cheap.
Yea, WEN is the champ for cheap power tools, but notice I say cheap.
Nothing wrong with the Laguna band saw, but look at the Rikon and Harvey C-14. I liked the guides better on the Harvey. 3 HP etc.
Again on the Borg, you can find very nice wheel marking gauges dirt cheap. You do have to sharpen the wheel. I have several.
I found the Trend Stealth dust mask to fit me the best. Eclipse was good too, but the Stealth fits.
Lots of competition on contractor table saws. Personally, the bigger and heavier the safer I feel. Job-site saws just scare me. Really, a riving knife is the biggest deal.
The WEN spindle sander is the best of the bunch that look alike. Longer stroke. I swapped mine for the Ridgid belt/spindle sander though.
I just swapped my digital calipers for the Igange dial calipers that read in fractions. No battery dead all the time etc. I do still have a pair of very good digital, but for woodworking, I really love my dial ones.
Cheap diamond stones are just that, cheap. DMT are expensive, but check out Trend. I think Stumpy had a vidio on the different types.
I love my Narlex Rictor cryo treated chisel. I only have a 1/2 inch as I have a full set of old Marples. The Cryo does hold the edge longer and they are almost ready to use out of the box.
I grabbed the uber expenvice 3M ROS. Worth it in my view. 3M purple mesh disks of course. In reality, the disks are 90% of th emagic. I have a DeWalt ROS I hate, so it was a good excuse.
Planer but no jointer? Just doing a fence jig on the TS maybe?

You did forget blue masking tape and tubes of super glue.

CAUTION: the dust extractor needs to be a HEPA canister. The bag collectors just power disperse the dangerous fines into the air so you are sure to breath them. I ust the giant overkill Clear View and my vac uses the small cyclone. he DUst DEputy is just as good in various sizes. Ultimate small shop is of course the Harvey Gryo. $$$$

I am sure everyone has their preferences. I just got back from spending all my money at the MWTCA meet.
 

PeteM

Pete
Corporate Member
". . . to make small decorative boxes, custom closet organizers, and DIY projects around the house."

That's quite a list for relatively small and simple projects.
I agree with what Scott said. Rather than doing a massive tool buy (as much fun as that may be) I think you would be better off buying tools on an as-needed basis.
My approach would be to list the first bunch of projects you plan on building and then make a list of what you need to build them.
Most of all don't overthink it. Get your basic tools and all the small stuff can be ordered online as you need them..
 

ssmith

Scott
Senior User
+ 1 on buy what you need when you need it.

The TS and planer are both good choices within their class - hobbyist duty but good performance and safety features for the money.

Many here may differ but IMO a ROS produces a poorer finish than a true finish sander - I've found it's difficult to get wood, particularly softwoods, truly flat with a velcro-mounted pad. So, while you may want a ROS for stock removal you may want to consider something like a Makita BO3710 too.
 

Wiley's Woodworks

Wiley
Corporate Member
When I made the commitment to make woodworking my hobby and avocation, I started out just like you started. I quickly realized buying stuff piece by piece and running all over 6 counties was a major time waster. So, I put an ad in Craigslist (you might as well do Facebook too) "Want To Buy--Entire Woodworking Shop--Wall to Wall". I kept it running and got 5-6 responses over a 2 month period. I wound up going to look at 3, and purchased the last one. I saved $thousands, and many of the tools were higher quality than I would have bought. Plus there were a lot of little items and extras--I got 4 band saw blades, 3 Forrest table saw blades, quality lumber, more clamps than I know what to do with, come to mind--that would have added up to a lot of bucks if I had purchased them individually.

If you stick to your plan, I have 10 suggestions:
  1. Get a combination square that is all all English--1/8" to 1/64". You'll never use metric in woodworking.
  2. Since you're getting set up bars, get a 1-2-3 block, maybe 2.
  3. Drop the HD Dustopper and get the appropriate Oneida cyclone separator that matches your whole-shop vac. Oneida customer service will consult with you and match the appropriate cyclone. Get all connecting hoses (vac to cyclone and maybe a 2 1/2" long hose that reaches most of your shop) at the same time. After consulting rethink your main shop vac.
  4. Get a set of counter sink bits, not just one size.
  5. Consider a set of pilot hole/countersink drills with adjustable depth stop.
  6. Since you'll be making boxes, you'll be using hinges. Get a set of self-centering drill bits. I like Snappy, but cheap ones will do.
  7. Some kind of joinery fixture. Doweling jig, dovetail jig, domino machine (expensive!). Otherwise you'll struggle to make boxes and drawer frames with any structural strength. Cutting locking lap joints with a table saw or router is tedious and requires precision.
  8. More clamps; concentrate in 6" to 24" sizes. I use my hand squeeze clamps more than any other type, and they provide all the pressure I need for glue-ups. Pipe clamps and screw clamps are for forcing joinery to fit and straightening warped boards.
  9. Get a respirator for finishing. Make it a high priority. N95 dust masks are nice to have when you're sanding.
  10. You don't have any mention of a lathe. It isn't essential, but plan your shop layout to add one as a low priority.
Good luck and welcome to the marvelous black hole of woodworking.
 

TekTrixter

Thanos
User
Thanks for everyone's advice! To clarify - I'm not getting everything all at once, but am planning out what to get as I need it. Priority is to the band saw, table saw, and safety equipment.

I do need to be able to make things for my wife on request ("If you put all this money into a wood working shop then you don't have any excuse to make me stuff too!"), so some of the items are planning for the most common things she might want me to make.

I already have a 3m Xtract ROS, 1-2-3 blocks, doweling jig, pocket hole jig, and a respirator.
 
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HITCH-

Hitch
User
Thanos where are you located? There might be a community woodworking shop that you could use while you are building your shop.
 

TekTrixter

Thanos
User
Thanos where are you located? There might be a community woodworking shop that you could use while you are building your shop.
I'm near Morehead City. I've searched online, but havent seen a community woodworking shop or makerspace within an hour drive.
 

wbarnes

Will
Corporate Member
I'm near Morehead City. I've searched online, but havent seen a community woodworking shop or makerspace within an hour drive.
There is a place called Shop Class in downtown New Bern that has everything you should need to use for a while. I go every other month or so to use one of their bigger tools for projects. It’s $12.50/hour.

PM me if you need help with anything local. I’m close by in Havelock.
 

TekTrixter

Thanos
User
There is a place called Shop Class in downtown New Bern that has everything you should need to use for a while. I go every other month or so to use one of their bigger tools for projects. It’s $12.50/hour.

PM me if you need help with anything local. I’m close by in Havelock.
Thank you for letting me know about Shop Space. It will let me get started without waiting on getting my own woodworking shop setup.

Is there a meet up anyplace around here? I've seen one in the Triangle, but nothing closer to us.
 

wbarnes

Will
Corporate Member
There is a group called Crystal Coast Woodworkers that meets in Morehead. I get their monthly meeting emails but I haven’t been able to make it to a meeting yet. Reach out to @mlzettl for more info and to get added to the email distro.
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Development Director
Hank
Corporate Member
Welcome Thanos!
We will be in Hickory on October 21st and 22nd at the Klingspor Extravaganza I know it is a 5 hour trip each way, but I wanted to make sure you know about it AND that you might get a GREAT deal or two (espically on some of your big ticket items) if you can make it and you wallet can handle it!
 

TekTrixter

Thanos
User
There is a place called Shop Class in downtown New Bern that has everything you should need to use for a while. I go every other month or so to use one of their bigger tools for projects. It’s $12.50/hour.

PM me if you need help with anything local. I’m close by in Havelock.
I was able to take my qualification (safety and operation) today at Shop Class, so I can start working on stuff there soon! It was great to get a little hands-on with the big tools. Thanks again for the recommendation!

I am not able to PM you, likely because I'm a new member. It might work if you PM me first.
 

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