Sycamore, walnut

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zachman

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zach
Need some suggestions. Recently acquired a large walnut and a sycamore log. We're going to mill but unsure the best strategy. With regards to walnut it was once recommended to me to never get it quarter sawn, but no explanation as to why was offered. The same guy said always plain saw the thing. For the sycamore I was thinking quarter sawn, or taking three billets, flat sawi ng the middle, quarter and rifting the outer billets.

Thanks y'all
Zach
 

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Jeremy Scuteri

Jeremy
Staff member
I am sure some of our experienced sawyers will chime in. I think quarter sawn walnut is beautiful. I had several boards that were cut from the center of the log (or close the center). When cutting the center part of the tree out of these boards, you end up with quarter sawn walnut boards. I think they were awesome.
 

CrealBilly

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Jeff
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cyclopentadiene

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My opinion is different for both

Flat sawn sycamore is relatively boring. Quartersawn has amazing grain.

I like both with walnut but there is a lot more waste with Quartersawn and unless the tree is huge, you can get a higher yield flat sawn.
 

cpowell

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Chuck
I like flat sawn walnut.

Regardless of flat or QS, you are pretty close to me. If the wood is clear and no shake and will be KD then I would be interested in some.

Chuck
 

Jeff

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Jeff
I like both with walnut but there is a lot more waste with Quartersawn and unless the tree is huge, you can get a higher yield flat sawn.

I think that's a popular myth. Our sawyers will comment about it. QS is more expensive because it's much more time and labor intensive. It's not about waste.
 

StephenK

New User
Stephen
I dont know squat diddly about milling lumber, but CrealBilly's link indicates QS takes twice as many cuts while having less waste.

I've always been told sycamore likes to warp and twist when flat sawn...
 

scsmith42

New User
Scott Smith
Large sycamore logs can yield some spectacular QS lumber. Flat sawn sycamore is prone to twisting.

QS in general requires around 2.5x to 3x more time than flat sawing. The question of waste is related to the sawing method. Methods that produce only QS and minimal RS result in greater waste than FS. Standard QS methods will produce a little more waste than FS if the FS method is capturing low grade boards from some of the slab material from the sides of the logs.

Re the walnut, large logs are usually best flatsawn with the pith centered on both opening faces. This will yield wide boards with centered cathedral grain and vertical grain along the edges of the boards. Boards like this are more desirable for wide panel glue-ups by advanced craftsmen because they allow you a better opportunity to edge match the grain and obfuscate the glue line between the boards.


Scott
 

zachman

New User
zach
I like flat sawn walnut.

Regardless of flat or QS, you are pretty close to me. If the wood is clear and no shake and will be KD then I would be interested in some.

Chuck

I randomly ran into the guy with both logs. Not exactly why they were even cut down. I didn't plan on kiln drying either, and the walnut is questionable at best, he didn't seal the ends when it came down. If it turns out better than I thought you're more than welcome to see if you could use any
 

CrealBilly

New User
Jeff
Sycamore generally has a big butt flair like you have shown. I generally don't bother trimming off the bark when I qs something with a big butt flair. You simply waste to much good wood trimming. Also you save an extra cut per board too, which reduces milling time.

it's natures way of telling you somethings wrong
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0V0Vu_utUZY
 
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