Shop invention

Martin Roper

Martin
Senior User
I'm not getting any younger and I can't wrangle sheet goods around like I used to, especially out of the van and onto sawhorses where I can cut it down to size.

I wanted something low and mobile so that I can simply pull a sheet out onto a cart and wheel it wherever I needed it. It also had to be collapsible so it wouldn't take up valuable space in my one-bay "shop." It would also be nice if I could break down sheets right on it rather than have to lift them yet again onto something else.

So I came up with this:

1634849712522.jpeg


1634849874339.jpeg


1634850061218.jpeg


Folded up it's only 36x8x25, so I can easily stow it in a corner. Unfolded it's 36x72.

I still have some things to work out:

1) Some kind of locking mechanism to keep the legs straight when unfolded.
2) Support in the middle for the sheet goods to rest on.
3) A way to add sacrificial OSB or whatever to the tops of the ends and the yet-to-be-determined middle supports.

I have an idea of how to combine 1 and 2. I'll work on that tomorrow. Maybe just double-sided tape for the OSB.

This may end up being a prototype. I wish I had made the rails wider and used wider hinges.
 

Fishbucket

Joe
Senior User
Great idea !

Could you cut notches into the edge of the tops and drop some 1x’s by what ever length to make it ridged?
Maybe cut some slots into the top to store these strengtheners upright with the invention in the corner?
 

Charles Lent

Charley
Corporate Member
A Free Idea - Double sided tape or Velcro will hold your sacrificial pieces in place. You don't even need to add my name to the patent.

Move the top folding brace to the top of the end pieces and it will support the sheet stock in the middle area.

The two 1 by pieces suggested above dropped into blind slots in each end will only work at full extension. For less extension, you will need shorter pieces and some kind of end pins to keep them in place. Two piece poles with a locking slide in the middle and pins to drop into holes in the end pieces would work. Then you could adjust the length of these as needed from 50-100% extension.

I've seen your idea before in a magazine years ago. Never built one.


I built a roughly 30 X 70" frame from 1 by 4 pine with 5 2X4 pieces laid flat and placed level with the top of the frame. One in the center, and two positioned near each end, to allow attaching metal banquet table folding legs. When folded, they are within the frame, so the thickness of the frame. All joints were joined with biscuits and glue, so only the short screws that attach the banquet legs are metal that are in the wood. So I don't worry about hitting metal as long as my blade depth is never more than about 1/4" into this table. I can drag full sheets out of my truck onto it, and use a straight edge and circular saw, or similar, to break up the sheets into manageable sizes or cut to size as I want. As I make each cut, I reposition the larger piece to maintain a good center of gravity, and then make another cut. Nothing falls to the ground or driveway.

I added two small squares of Baltic Birch plywood to one side of this table, using an off center screw through each one. They are spaced about 4' apart on one of the long sides. If I rotate these so they stick up above the table top, I can tip the table on it's side and then place a sheet of plywood or other sheet stock on top of these small pieces and leaning against the table. I then reach down and pick up the table and sheet, tipping it upright until the table is again on it's 4 legs, but now with the sheet laying on top of the table and ready for cutting. I turn the small pieces of plywood 180 deg so they are below the table surface and then reposition the sheet for cutting.

When finished using this table, I fold the legs into the frame and place this cutting table on edge against my sheet stock on my shop where it adds only 3 1/2" to the thickness of the stored sheets. I don't worry about kerfs in the top. If I ever use the table enough to make the top surface ugly enough, I'll just remove the legs and build another table top.

A sheet of plywood placed on top of this table makes a great picnic expansion table too, for when more guests show up than planned.

Charley
 

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tvrgeek

Scott
Corporate Member
Nicely done. I plan on something similar that matches up right with my tailgate. I keep the sheet of foam hanging in the garage, so all easy. One of these days I'll get a proper track saw, but for now, I just use a chalk line and my Makita cordless.
 

Charles Lent

Charley
Corporate Member
I have long straight edge clamps that I use with my cutting table. One is for cross panel cuts and 50"+ long. The other is for long cuts and about 98" long in capacity. They adjust in clamping length much like the narrow extruded aluminum straight edge clamps, but are wider. They came from Peachtree Woodworking. I break down all of my sheet stock with this table, outside my shop, because I 1. Don't like moving full sheets around any more. 2. Because my shop is small and although I have a 52" Unisaw, there isn't enough room to wrestle a full panel through the Unisaw without moving a lot of stuff. I break full sheets down outside and then trim them to exact size inside on my Unisaw.

For moving full sheets around standing on their edge, I built this panel mover. It's just 2 large lawn mower wheels with their axle stubs, screwed to several scrap pieces of plywood with the gap between the larger pieces about 1" by stacking several small varying thickness pieces of plywood together. I made the outer pieces long because with two metal knee replacements, I don't bend over well. The longer pieces with the handle holes cut in them lets me carry and position this easily without bending over. Without wind, a full sheet of 3/4" cabinet birch will remain upright in this DIY panel mover. Bigger wheels make easier passage over rough surfaces. I had built one of these with the smaller front wheels from the lawn mower, but it didn't handle the small step coming out of my shop well. The larger rear wheels from this same dead lawn mower made a huge difference. That's not my street, It's my driveway and front yard. The photos were taken just outside my shop. Now almost 80, and with 7 heart surgeries so far, I need many tricks and gadget assistance to be able to keep woodworking..

Charley
 

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pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
I have long straight edge clamps that I use with my cutting table. One is for cross panel cuts and 50"+ long. The other is for long cuts and about 98" long in capacity. They adjust in clamping length much like the narrow extruded aluminum straight edge clamps, but are wider. They came from Peachtree Woodworking. I break down all of my sheet stock with this table, outside my shop, because I 1. Don't like moving full sheets around any more. 2. Because my shop is small and although I have a 52" Unisaw, there isn't enough room to wrestle a full panel through the Unisaw without moving a lot of stuff. I break full sheets down outside and then trim them to exact size inside on my Unisaw.

For moving full sheets around standing on their edge, I built this panel mover. It's just 2 large lawn mower wheels with their axle stubs, screwed to several scrap pieces of plywood with the gap between the larger pieces about 1" by stacking several small varying thickness pieces of plywood together. I made the outer pieces long because with two metal knee replacements, I don't bend over well. The longer pieces with the handle holes cut in them lets me carry and position this easily without bending over. Without wind, a full sheet of 3/4" cabinet birch will remain upright in this DIY panel mover. Bigger wheels make easier passage over rough surfaces. I had built one of these with the smaller front wheels from the lawn mower, but it didn't handle the small step coming out of my shop well. The larger rear wheels from this same dead lawn mower made a huge difference. That's not my street, It's my driveway and front yard. The photos were taken just outside my shop. Now almost 80, and with 7 heart surgeries so far, I need many tricks and gadget assistance to be able to keep woodworking..

Charley
Well thought-out design!
 

MGT

Mike
User
A Free Idea - Double sided tape or Velcro will hold your sacrificial pieces in place. You don't even need to add my name to the patent.

Move the top folding brace to the top of the end pieces and it will support the sheet stock in the middle area.

The two 1 by pieces suggested above dropped into blind slots in each end will only work at full extension. For less extension, you will need shorter pieces and some kind of end pins to keep them in place. Two piece poles with a locking slide in the middle and pins to drop into holes in the end pieces would work. Then you could adjust the length of these as needed from 50-100% extension.

I've seen your idea before in a magazine years ago. Never built one.


I built a roughly 30 X 70" frame from 1 by 4 pine with 5 2X4 pieces laid flat and placed level with the top of the frame. One in the center, and two positioned near each end, to allow attaching metal banquet table folding legs. When folded, they are within the frame, so the thickness of the frame. All joints were joined with biscuits and glue, so only the short screws that attach the banquet legs are metal that are in the wood. So I don't worry about hitting metal as long as my blade depth is never more than about 1/4" into this table. I can drag full sheets out of my truck onto it, and use a straight edge and circular saw, or similar, to break up the sheets into manageable sizes or cut to size as I want. As I make each cut, I reposition the larger piece to maintain a good center of gravity, and then make another cut. Nothing falls to the ground or driveway.

I added two small squares of Baltic Birch plywood to one side of this table, using an off center screw through each one. They are spaced about 4' apart on one of the long sides. If I rotate these so they stick up above the table top, I can tip the table on it's side and then place a sheet of plywood or other sheet stock on top of these small pieces and leaning against the table. I then reach down and pick up the table and sheet, tipping it upright until the table is again on it's 4 legs, but now with the sheet laying on top of the table and ready for cutting. I turn the small pieces of plywood 180 deg so they are below the table surface and then reposition the sheet for cutting.

When finished using this table, I fold the legs into the frame and place this cutting table on edge against my sheet stock on my shop where it adds only 3 1/2" to the thickness of the stored sheets. I don't worry about kerfs in the top. If I ever use the table enough to make the top surface ugly enough, I'll just remove the legs and build another table top.

A sheet of plywood placed on top of this table makes a great picnic expansion table too, for when more guests show up than planned.

Charley
Charley - I wish I had your creativity! Very nice design.
 

Charles Lent

Charley
Corporate Member
I also did a molding job and used this cutting table. I added a piece of plywood large enough to hold my miter saw, centered and toward the work side of the table, adding a few screws to hold it in place. The area of the table worked out great to hold lengths of molding behind the saw until needed, and plenty of room on either side of the saw to hold up the pieces being cut. I also added blocks to the surface of the 2 x 4s to hold the moldings at the height of the miter saw base. This worked very well, and I'll do it this way again if I ever need to cut moldings or trim pieces away from my shop.

The table us usually used with a 48 year old B&D Commercial rated circular saw. I've added a piece of Lexan to it's base with a hole large enough to let the blade guard swing, plus a zero clearance slit toward the front where the blade teeth rise. I can cut splinter and chip free cuts in birch plywood with it and both sides of the cut are clean and chip free. It was easy to make and has lasted many years.

The table height is almost the same height as the bed of my 1996 Dodge pickup (my go to the dump and lumberyard truck). It ain't pretty, but runs good and gets the job done.

The table is not my idea, but one that I saw many years ago in a woodworking magazine, and I personalized it a bit. The panel mover is similar to other's that I've seen, but of my own design using what I had available to make it from. Take the ideas and photos and build your own versions. Since my knee replacements, I can no longer do things at ground level. These were my solution to my problem.

I have one request - I want to see pictures of your version of these posted here.

Charley
 

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Martin Roper

Martin
Senior User
Here it is in use.
1635532681701.jpeg


This is my (current) solution to the stiffening issue I discussed in my first post. The supports fit into the recesses on the outside of the end cases. I'll install a couple dowels and drill a few holes into these to hang them on the dowels for storage.
1635532810680.jpeg


I clamped a support to each side to prevent the hinges from folding and to support weight in the middle. Eventually I'll put two more threaded inserts in these.
1635533109005.jpeg


I used it to break down a 4'x8' x 30mm sheet of Valchromat that I could never have managed by myself without it. For now I just laid OSB on top of it.
 

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