Now what?

wndopdlr

wally
Senior User
My latest project has a problem. I am making a simple bridle rack for the stables where I ride. The wood is Oak which is many years old and lives in my shop which is climate controlled year round. I used Minwax stain/sealer, let it rest for 10 hours and them applied Minwax poly. It is "gummy" in spots, and I don't know why or what to do with it. I thought about wiping it down with mineral sprits, but thought I would check here first.

Any thoughts on how I salvage this piece?
 

Raymond

Raymond
Staff member
Corporate Member
Is it the oil-based Minwax Poly? I ask because I use Minwax water-based products and I know they make both types. If it is the oil-based, you can probably wipe it down with mineral spirits - wait for everything to dry, Sand it again - just to remove any lingering finish and then apply a sanding sealer before the final sanding and then proceed with your usual process.
 

wndopdlr

wally
Senior User
Is it the oil-based Minwax Poly? I ask because I use Minwax water-based products and I know they make both types. If it is the oil-based, you can probably wipe it down with mineral spirits - wait for everything to dry, Sand it again - just to remove any lingering finish and then apply a sanding sealer before the final sanding and then proceed with your usual process.
Yes, it is the oil based poly. Still not sure where the train jumped the tracks. I date all my products and this can was only a year old. I have used stuff much older and never had a problem. If I am understanding you correctly, it will be OK to use sanding sealer over any poly that may remain on the piece? I always thought sanding sealer was to go on first.
 

tvrgeek

Scott
Corporate Member
Red Oak being very open grain will absorb the oils and leach them out for quite a time. A week in a good drying environment is how I treat oak. ( storage loft in my shop is great) So, when you did the poly, the stain oils had not dried out yet. I suspect the stain/sealer leaches slower than just using a sealer then stain, then poly.

You can try to wipe it down, let it cure, and then top coat, or you can just wait a year.

Minwax products are fine. Maybe some are a little better, but they are just fine and have been for 115 years.
You might contact Minwax for their suggestions. I am not a fan of multi-use products. Sealer, stain, top all different. I do tint my poly frequently knowing it does take longer to cure.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, Events Director
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
Not sure what is problem is but here is a guess. It seems Minwax sanding sealer is now water-based. The orange and blue stores only carry the water -based sealer. I do not mix water-based and solvent-based(oil), it never seems to work.
 

Oka

Board of Directors, Vice President
Casey
Staff member
Corporate Member
Phil is on to something. The general rule is to keep like for like mediums. That said, if the top coat is solvent based, then the prime or sealer needs to be the same.
Also, if you have a non drying surface and you need to clean it off to do again. When you strip it with mineral spirits mix a small amount of linseed oil or turpentine along with some Japan drier. This mix has worked well for me when removing a failed finish like this.
 

Raymond

Raymond
Staff member
Corporate Member
Not sure what is problem is but here is a guess. It seems Minwax sanding sealer is now water-based. The orange and blue stores only carry the water -based sealer. I do not mix water-based and solvent-based(oil), it never seems to work.
Thanks, Phil. I didn't know that Minwax sanding sealer was only water-based. I use only water-based mediums due to past experience with insurance claims (after a house fire) and will no longer use or store oil-based products in my shop.
 

wndopdlr

wally
Senior User
I worked it out. Went with Raymond's suggestion, wiped it down with mineral sprits and followed it up with Minwax sanding sealer. Their product is water based but says on the can that it will work with either water or oil based poly. I applied three coats of oil based poly, sanding between coats and the project is finished.

Must admit that I held my breath using a water based product under the oil based poly, but in this case it worked OK...not sure I would ever do that again.
 

Raymond

Raymond
Staff member
Corporate Member
Glad it worked out for you, Wally.

Chris and Scotty, we had a house fire back in the late 80's - insurance adjuster found a can of oil in the burned out garage and denied the claim due to an "accelerant" being present. 7-1/2 years of legal wrangling but we finally prevailed - Texas made our insurance at the time change their policies due to the court findings. I rank insurance companies right at the bottom of the scum pond.
 

blackhawk

Brad
Corporate Member
Wally - I have had this same situation happen to me. Did you wipe off the excess stain within 15 minutes of it being applied? That is very important and especially on the Minwax stains that have "red" in the name like red mahogany. For the "reds", I wipe them off within 5 minutes. I found this out when I was staining a cherry bookcase with red mahogany stain. I was trying to get it to be very dark to match an existing dresser. Instead of doing a 2nd coat after the 1st coat dried, I just put on a very heavy coat and didn't wipe it off until 2 hours later. When I applied the polyurethane, I had the same gummy feel that you described. I called Minwax and they told me about the "reds". They told me to wipe it down with mineral spirits, let it dry and re-apply the poly. That did the trick. Bookcase still looks great after 15 years.
 

wndopdlr

wally
Senior User
Thanks Brad. I know i wiped the stain within 15 minutes, but I may not have wiped it clean enough. The gum was just in some areas and those spots may have soaked up more stain or I just didn't get it clean. Good thought nevertheless and I appreciate it.
 

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top