Dewalt DW788 Scroll saw (Type1) PRICE REDUCED - $325

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
I had put "the word" out that I was looking for a Dewalt Scroll saw when I bought Bobby's
A friend found one and purchased it for me and showed up with it!

I just heard back from one of our trusted scrollers that he too thought the price was too high...
Hopefully you can help me recoup part of my losses!

So... I had to pay him!

I can't use two of them, and hoping to pass this one along to someone who can appreciate and use it.
It does have the stand, but I am NOT impressed!
It seems to be in GOOD condition, but I am NOT an expert and not sure what to look for except that it cuts 3/4" cherry like a hot knife through butter!
It DOES NOT have the material hold-down - it is missing...
The air blow does work.
Located in Greenville / Greer / Simpsonville, South Carolina
I have videos of it running and it passes the Nickle test! (see the capture from the video below)
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SamE0717

SamE0717
User
I'm no scroll saw expert but my understanding is that the "Type 1" scroll saws like @Hmerkle has are coveted because they were manufactured in North America (USA or Canada) where any "new" Dewalt scroll saw is a "Type 2" and all "Type 2" are manufactured in Asia. (China, Twain etc)
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
Memory serves, the difference is Canada vs Taiwan, minor design differences. I’ll stand corrected, but also consider 20 year old machine, bearing, bushings etc. Taiwan doesn’t bother me one iota every machine I own is made in Taiwan.
 

Charles Lent

Charley
Corporate Member
The first type 2's had some problems, but they were worked out in the first 6 months. A new type 2 is every bit as good as a little used 20 year old type 1 and likely much cleaner.

Charley
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
So help me out here - where are all our scrollers who told me $400 was a fair price for a type 1 DeWalt scroll saw...

For those of you taking a Pi$$ at me - it does say OBO which means or best offer
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
$2-250.

One thing I would mention and a mistake I made when I bought mine (type 2), was don't just turn it on and listen to it run, cut a piece of wood on it. Mine sounded fine, the first time I used it was clacking like crazy.

A broken screw and 2 bad bearings later, it still knocks a little but works fine. It really needs a total rebuild.

For anyone interested there is an excellent series on rebuilding a 788 on the Gwinnett Woodworking channel by a really smart guy name Bob Brokaw.
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
$2-250.

One thing I would mention and a mistake I made when I bought mine (type 2), was don't just turn it on and listen to it run, cut a piece of wood on it. Mine sounded fine, the first time I used it was clacking like crazy.

A broken screw and 2 bad bearings later, it still knocks a little but works fine. It really needs a total rebuild.

For anyone interested there is an excellent series on rebuilding a 788 on the Gwinnett Woodworking channel by a really smart guy name Bob Brokaw.
Curious,
How much did you pay for your type 2? did you buy it new?
 

Jclrk

Jclrk
Corporate Member
I don't know why everyone puts there 2 cents in if you want the saw buy it or make an offer other wise move on. Everyone here knows more than me I'm new at this and there are some awesome people here but some of you come off being an ass.
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
Sorry for some reason I had it in my mind you were buying it.

Guess that does make me an ass, but I promise I would never pi$$ on anyone!

:)
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
Sorry for some reason I had it in my mind you were buying it.

Guess that does make me an ass, but I promise I would never pi$$ on anyone!

:)
No worries,
Now I appreciate that you were looking out for me! (Not that I was trying to “take” somebody)LOL


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Lhloy

Larry
Senior User
The DW788 has 16 bearings in the 'drive train' linkage from the motor eccentric to the blade. All but the first one are needle bearings. You can immediately assess the condition of these bearings by (unplug the saw first) removing the blade, and reach one hand under the table and hold the bottom blade holder still. Any vertical motion of the upper blade chuck without the corresponding motion in the lower chuck represents lost motion in the drive linkage and is either caused by worn bearings or possibly a loose bearing race 'clamp' screw. These bearings are press fitted but each inner race is hardened tubing that is only clamped axially in place with a machine screw and nut. The screw/tube geometry needs tight clamping pressure because the hole in the race is much larger than the clamping screw. These really small needle bearings are not expensive, but the hardened inner races are custom available only from Dewalt and they are proud of them. And because the needle bearings do not get full rotation, these inner races are pounded in the same place because of the small oscillation instead of rotation. Thus, the lubrication is vitally important and that is where the type 2 model has the poor reputation, but this is easy to fix. Bob Brokaw's videos are great.
 

Jclrk

Jclrk
Corporate Member
The DW788 has 16 bearings in the 'drive train' linkage from the motor eccentric to the blade. All but the first one are needle bearings. You can immediately assess the condition of these bearings by (unplug the saw first) removing the blade, and reach one hand under the table and hold the bottom blade holder still. Any vertical motion of the upper blade chuck without the corresponding motion in the lower chuck represents lost motion in the drive linkage and is either caused by worn bearings or possibly a loose bearing race 'clamp' screw. These bearings are press fitted but each inner race is hardened tubing that is only clamped axially in place with a machine screw and nut. The screw/tube geometry needs tight clamping pressure because the hole in the race is much larger than the clamping screw. These really small needle bearings are not expensive, but the hardened inner races are custom available only from Dewalt and they are proud of them. And because the needle bearings do not get full rotation, these inner races are pounded in the same place because of the small oscillation instead of rotation. Thus, the lubrication is vitally important and that is where the type 2 model has the poor reputation, but this is easy to fix. Bob Brokaw's videos are great.
Watched these videos last night what a great resource thanks man
 

Pop Golden

Pop
Corporate Member
Hank, I have a type 1. Try as I might I can't make the hold down work. Multiple mods later it's still useless. The thing is too large for small scroll work. My final mod was to replace the wire hoop with a Lexan foot it works, but not great.

Pop :(
 

Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
1.If you like it, that’s what matters! A Dewalt is very well made. And not fussy.
2. That stand is not the Dewalt stand.
3.The first thing scrollers do is take that hold down off and throw it somewhere.
4.Use your hands to guide and hold the work down.
5.You aren’t going to cut your finger off, unless you are VERY determined and have a dozen blades ready.
 

ScottM

Scott
Staff member
Corporate Member
I recently gave away a 20 year old plus Type 2. It had 1000's of hours. These saw have their flaws but with proper care and technique they can anything that a scroll saw can be asked to do. Even cutting stock up to 1.5" thick. Are there better saws on the market the answer is yes but they will cost $800-$1500. FYI... you seldom find those better saw for sale in the used tool market.
 

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