Wine cabinet commission

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
We start off with a Solidworks rendering. This is not a parametric design, just a fast way to produce a model of what the item will look like.

Customer is satisfied after a few update, the upper sides will be closed, not as shown.

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Wine cabinet with a mirror, glass shelf and a wine cooler. I tried to put the cooler in the middle, but then it won’t work in the space where the customer wishes to place it. Not shown will be wine glass holders suspended in the top.

Will be done in Cherry.

Customer signs the deposit check

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Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Next I use a piece of handy software, which is free for download to anyone. eCabinet Systems. This is handy to do the casework and case cut list, but it can be used to design a full kitchen layout with pretty good realistic photo rendering.

The lower and upper case internals are thus designed.

Base and Top.jpg


From the casework design, I produce the entire Maple ply cut list, the software does sheet optimisation.

I will just post a couple of sheets to show an example

Ply cut list_0002.jpg



Then it is off to the shop, each part is marked with a pencil, no thinking necessary just cut as per list on the panel saw and stack all the panels.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
All plywood cut to cut lists.

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The customer unfortunately wants real pretty Cherry stained, to look like golden Oak.

So we did a few samples with Minwax stain and after they chose the color, I used Transtint to copy the color. Produced another sample for their approval. The process I used with Transtint was a 50% thinned conversion varnish clear coat, lightly applied. Follow with a light scuff sand. Then a conversion varnish coat clear, no reducer. The piece is now properly sealed. Then 50% thinned conversion varnish coat with the Transtint. This allows zero blotching. A final clear coat not reduced follows.


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No rush on this project, doing it at leasure.

Tomorrow we will start assembling the bottom casework.
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
FANTABULOUS, Love your Husky, I also use ecabs, only this I have to correct is ecabs is NOT available to anyone, you must be recognized as a professional cabinet maker/shop befor you can get it. Ecabs is very complicated to me as a non computer person, i use only the top layer. to clarify to other folks;Ecabs can design down to the most micro level if you have the computer skills. Just for info, as ecabs designs if also generates the cnc code so if you have the equipment then you can mfg direct from the computer,just send code to the floor.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
Looks nice to me. But staining cherry to look like oak??? Oak is stronger, more dent resistant and cheaper. But whatever the client wants I guess... Doesn't detract at all from the workmanship.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Looks nice to me. But staining cherry to look like oak??? Oak is stronger, more dent resistant and cheaper. But whatever the client wants I guess... Doesn't detract at all from the workmanship.
The lady of the house wants something to blend in with current colors. Most folks look at lumber totally different to us woodworkers.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
FANTABULOUS, Love your Husky, I also use ecabs, only this I have to correct is ecabs is NOT available to anyone, you must be recognized as a professional cabinet maker/shop befor you can get it. Ecabs is very complicated to me as a non computer person, i use only the top layer. to clarify to other folks;Ecabs can design down to the most micro level if you have the computer skills. Just for info, as ecabs designs if also generates the cnc code so if you have the equipment then you can mfg direct from the computer,just send code to the floor.
I have use eCabinets for a while. I can’t remember if I used my company information when I registered. They have a series of videos on Vimeo which one can subscribe to at $25 and once you have worked through those the software is easy.

It is not at the level of 2020, but it is free.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
The customer unfortunately wants real pretty Cherry stained, to look like golden Oak.
That's interesting. I like the stained cherry but it's something that not many of us would think about or consider.fo sheet goods

Where did you get the panel saw? That's handy if you use a lot of sheet goods.
 
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Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
That's interesting. I like the stained cherry but it's something that not many of us would think about or consider.fo sheet goods

Where did you get the panel saw? That's handy if you use a lot of sheet goods.
Auction and rebuilt it. It was a panel router, which I converted.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
The lady of the house wants something to blend in with current colors. Most folks look at lumber totally different to us woodworkers.
Agreed. Some people think figured cherry is "splotchy". So it gets sprayed with stain to have even color even if it hides the nice grain. Not in my house but if it's for a customer...
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
why would you remodel something done in solidworks? And Solidworks is parametric....
Because I can do a Solidworks rendering in 30 minutes, but a parametric drawing where I have to design each part in 3D and then assemble the entire piece takes much longer. eCabinets is set up specifically for cabinet design, the casework shown can be done in 10 minutes, with the cut lists and material costs included.

If you are familiaR with Solidworks, the case shown I just extruded a cube, then did a extruded cut to hollow it out. If I had to do that Parametric, I would have to draw and extrude each piece of plywood and then assemble them.

In eCabinets, all those models are already available, you specify height and width and you are done, cut lists and material costs included.
 
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Charles Lent

Charley
Corporate Member
Some wine coolers give off the heat from the cabinet sides, and some from the back. Be sure to know which style you will be using, and make provisions for the cooler to give off the heat from refrigeration by providing adequate ventilation, or your client's wine will be warm and their electric bill high. For the rear coil version, leaving the back out of the cabinet works well. For the ones with the coils built into the sides, the cabinet is going to need to be wider, and with vents to allow air circulation up the sides of the cooler and out. I prefer the rear coil versions when building them into cabinets.

Charley
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Some wine coolers give off the heat from the cabinet sides, and some from the back. Be sure to know which style you will be using, and make provisions for the cooler to give off the heat from refrigeration by providing adequate ventilation, or your client's wine will be warm and their electric bill high. For the rear coil version, leaving the back out of the cabinet works well. For the ones with the coils built into the sides, the cabinet is going to need to be wider, and with vents to allow air circulation up the sides of the cooler and out. I prefer the rear coil versions when building them into cabinets.

Charley
The more expensive ones can actually be totally enclosed. The condenser is part of the cooler cabinet. This is one of those. The cheaper ones around $300 - $500 are as you described.

Thanks for the pointer. When I build standard refrigerator cabinets, the upper cabinet has 4” less depth, with a scribed back panel. That allows the condenser to vent straight up right through the cabinet.
 

chris_goris

Chris
Senior User
Because I can do a Solidworks rendering in 30 minutes, but a parametric drawing where I have to design each part in 3D and then assemble the entire piece takes much longer. eCabinets is set up specifically for cabinet design, the casework shown can be done in 10 minutes, with the cut lists and material costs included.

If you are familiaR with Solidworks, the case shown I just extruded a cube, then did a extruded cut to hollow it out. If I had to do that Parametric, I would have to draw and extrude each piece of plywood and then assemble them.

In eCabinets, all those models are already available, you specify height and width and you are done, cut lists and material costs included.
I hear what youre saying, but Solidworks has far more power than youre giving it credit. You can setup a solidworks parametric (generic) model of cabinets complete with drawings, sheet layouts and all attached and do just it once. Thats what parametric systems like solidworks are designed to do.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
I hear what youre saying, but Solidworks has far more power than youre giving it credit. You can setup a solidworks parametric (generic) model of cabinets complete with drawings, sheet layouts and all attached and do just it once. Thats what parametric systems like solidworks are designed to do.
You can’t compare Solidworks to 2020, or eCabinets or any other cabinet program. They are totally different things.
Solidworks is a very powerful 3D Cad program.

Cabinet software have crude CAD abilities, but they have unlimited drop in models, from unlimited cabinet suppliers, including cabinet appliances and hardware. They do job costing material cut lists and a lot more. They have superb photo rendering, including cats, dogs, a swimming pool seen through a window etc. I can send an eCabinets file to anyone who has a Thermwood CNC, they can drop in the file, load the materials and cut everything in my design.

For one person to do that in Solidworks, one lifetime will not be enough time.

By the way, I have been using Solidworks almost since it’s inception, as a mold designer in the plastics injection and blow molding industry. That is where they cut their teeth and developed the platform to what it is today.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
With the cut list done, today is bottom case assembly.

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I do not do enough cabinet work to justify cool toys, so I amusing an inexpensive Kreg jig with 1 1/4” pocket screws for assembly.



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Bottom case is assembled. The top case is in unfinished Cherry ply which will be visible, so I have done all the pocket holes, but will spray finish that before assembly. The toe on the bottom case was sprayed before assembly as shown below. The face frame was measured off the assembled case, pocket screwed and will be attached also after I have spray finished it.

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