White cabinet doors.

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Shoot I thought white was el cheapo?

A different ball game, I made a sample, but every little sanding scratch and plywood bump shows.

Will have to go get some MDF core ply and fine tune my sanding practices.

Anyone here do white doors, what am I missing?

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Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
You are right. White shows every scratch, black is even worse. Try priming with a high solids primer and then block sand by hand.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
You are right. White shows every scratch, black is even worse. Try priming with a high solids primer and then block sand by hand.
Yep, but there must be another trick? I want to do 20 doors, I will be block sanding forever.

I am going to try MDF core ply and finish that with a 400 RO after the high solids prime coat. Then assemble the door and send the entire door through the drum sander with a final pass at 220 grit. Then prime the door and run the RO at 400. Then spray the final two coats. If that does not do it, will throw in the towel.
 

Ecr1

Chuck
Senior User
What finish are you using. Most shops would be using double refined mdf for the panel. That’s what I use for flat panel doors. As long as the door is flat and smooth before primer I usually just need a light block sand. If I have a lot to do I will put a soft backing pad on the RO and use it to speed up the process.
 

tarheelz

Dave
Corporate Member
The painted white cabinets in our house were built by a local guy in 2002. They are 3/4 and 1/2 plywood throughout with maple face frames. The doors and drawer faces, however, are MDF. 18 years later and they're still perfect. (Paint is oil based.)

EDIT: Anyone know where a regular joe can buy double-refined or super-refined MDF?
 
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srhardwoods

Chris
Senior User
Wurth wood group, A&M supply will carry the double refined MDF. I use it for my panels sanded to 400 grit, scuff sand in between coats with 320. After widebelt sanding, RO sand to 180 to get out the cross grain scratches. 2 coats of hi solid primer followed by 1 top coat of color finish.
 

redknife

Chris
Corporate Member
Aqua-coat grain filler is an option. It is generally easy to apply a few layers, although scaled to 20 doors may be more onerous than other options mentioned. I’ve used it for smaller projects. I would envision mdf center panel and aqua-coat treatment of frames.
 

tarheelz

Dave
Corporate Member
Wurth wood group, A&M supply will carry the double refined MDF. I use it for my panels sanded to 400 grit, scuff sand in between coats with 320. After widebelt sanding, RO sand to 180 to get out the cross grain scratches. 2 coats of hi solid primer followed by 1 top coat of color finish.
Looks like Wurth and A&M are business-to-business suppliers only. Regular 3/4" MDF from HD may be my best bet for the false fronts on the new set of base cabinets I'm adding to the kitchen. I've used spackle and AquaCoat before (with plywood edges and walnut furniture respectively). I'll figure something out and report back.
 

drw

Donn
Corporate Member
Double-refined and super-refined MDF are new terms to me, how do they differ from just MDF?
 

srhardwoods

Chris
Senior User
I've been told wurth will sell to walkins, in Norfolk at least they do. You can contact a cabinet shop and see if they will sell you some as well. I have customers that call me for it quite a bit. double refined/super refined are the same, some companies use different terminology for it. It uses smaller fibers, more binding agent. The board will be heavier than a regular MDF. Usually much darker in color as well. Paints much better than regular MDF.
 

blackhawk

Brad
Corporate Member
Pre-primed MDO (medium density overlay) could be an option. Product List I have used this a few times for signs. It has a resin paper bonded to high quality plywood. It is super smooth, no sanding required. This would work if you make the doors 1 piece and just route in a faux raised panel look.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
I have bought solid wood from the Wurth near the airport in Charlotte. They were very easy to buy from and had decent prices.

I like to use Resisthane tinted white with the compatible primer. Both are water based and dry very quicky. I made a tall bath cabinet for me from HD plywood and softwood which I like. I also used this finish on a crib and changing table for my grandson. It is maple and maple plywood. Resisthane is rated for kitchen cabinets. Sprays well with my mini-mite.
 

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