Tulip Sideboard Weeks 3, 4 and a little of 5

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Shamrock

New User
Michael
Here we go, making good progress

started week 3 gluing up the panels for the frame and panels for the inside bottom and back of case:





then mortises in the frame pieces


then the layout in prep for the dreaded glue-up





I decided to use space balls for these assemblies (they're fun to chase around the shop when you drop one on the floor)


then the panels glued up and in the clamps:





Then I cut the big-ol' top closer to it's final size (this is when you really need all the room you can get to the right of the blade)


Then I glued up the side panels (they are baltic birch cores with 1/8 thick faces resawed from the drawer fronts boards)








then groves, tenons, and rabbits (oh my) so all these pieces of the carcass fit together:











Notching the back panel to go around the legs:


Sides 1st dry fit:


Drumroll please : Here's the test fit of the carcass pieces:









Alright, now that everything fits on to leg details:

mortising the 2 front legs for the soss hinges:





then on the the 1st part of the leg design for the elongated spade foot:










then tapering the bottom of the legs:


and all 6 legs with all the joinery and design details:


the rest of week 5 will involve more grooving and dados in preparation for the interior carcass divider panels, that will allow me to measure for drawers which will take me awhile to build (8 total) and I still have some experimenting to do with which slides I'm going to use. Hope ya'll are enjoying the build
 
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Charlie

Charlie
Corporate Member
Mike, That is coming along well. Excellent craftsmanship. I'm anxious to see the finished product.
 

Jeremy Scuteri

Jeremy
Staff member
Corporate Member
Looks great. I have a few questions:

1) What are the large vertical clamps in the first picture? Are they serving as cauls? Are they attached to the wall?

2) In another picture, it looks like you are applying cabinet clamps to a piece that is in a vacuum press. What is going on with that?
 

Shamrock

New User
Michael
Jeremy, good eye! The clamps are Plano clamps:

http://www.advmachinery.com/p-24-plano-vertical-glue-press.aspx

I bought them from Jay Brewer used a few years ago (they are pricey and and I think I've seen Peachtree with a generic type version) They will not correct pieces that are out of square or bowed during glueup but they do keep things flat when glueing multiple boards up for panels.

The 2nd question is a good one. Here I am laminating 1/8 thick pieces of cherry to the baltic birch core and there are three separate pieces of cherry so 2 seams. I leave the sides of the cherry proud of the baltic birch between 1/16 and 1/8". I spread the glue then put the panel in the press turn it on and it applies downward pressure great but it's not really designed to apply pressure side to side, so, because I left the sides a little proud I can put bar clamps on the 1/8" thick cherry pieces to draw the seams together and they become almost invisible. I've not seen anybody else do this but I tried it on another project and it works really good for me. As you apply side pressure you can see glue squeeze out (because the vacuum bag is clear) and now you know the seams are well glued and they become almost invisible. You can see the glue lines in the pic your talking about, and they do not show up with vacuum pressure alone.

Matt, I still have yet to decided on how to construct the drawers. I don't want to use internal case webbing (is that the right word for wood divider/drawer runners?) So I'm thinking of 2 options considering these are inset drawers. Option a) using full extension side mount ball bearing slides that attach to the case sides. This option will require the front to be lipped to hide the slides on the sides (i.e the front will be wider on both sides the width of the slides so when the drawers are closed you don't see the slides) With this option I wouldn't use dovetails because your gonna see the slides on the side of the drawer when open. Option B) use the Blum Blumotion undermount full extension slides. In this option I'll use blind dovetails on the front and through dovetails on the back cause you will not see the slides, but they will still attach to the side of the case.

You got any other ideas?
 
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PeteM

Pete
Corporate Member
Matt, I still have yet to decided on how to construct the drawers. I don't want to use internal case webbing (is that the right word for wood divider/drawer runners?) So I'm thinking of 2 options considering these are inset drawers. Option a) using full extension side mount ball bearing slides that attach to the case sides. This option will require the front to be lipped to hide the slides on the sides (i.e the front will be wider on both sides the width of the slides so when the drawers are closed you don't see the slides) With this option I wouldn't use dovetails because your gonna see the slides on the side of the drawer when open. Option B) use the Blum Blumotion undermount full extension slides. In this option I'll use blind dovetails on the front and through dovetails on the back cause you will not see the slides, but they will still attach to the side of the case.

You got any other ideas?
FWIW - I wouldn't use the side mount slides. I just don't associate them with fine woodwork. With the undermount they'd be hidden.

. . . But for something different. How about this idea?
"Christian Becksvoort appreciates the resourcefulness of shopmade hardware, and he explains here how to make and install full-extension wooden drawer slides. He details the required components, how to build them, and how to install them. Detailed drawings and step-by-step instruction provide everything you need to know to use these drawer slides in your next project."

From Fine Woodworking #143
 

mlzettl

Matt
Corporate Member
Mike,

For traditional, well crafted, heirloom type furniture, I much prefer to build the drawers to fit in snug fitting drawer boxes that are essentially internal frames, with or without dust panels. This method certainly does require very careful construction of the drawers and frames, and sometimes tedious fitting of each drawer to get a smooth piston fit, but this is certainly well within your skill level. With an inset drawer front like you are describing, I would use half blind dovetails in front, and through dovetails in the back. Using high quality metal slides like those from Blum is certainly an option, and perhaps easier to do. If you use metal slides, you will need to construct the drawer, then add a false front, although if you do some careful planning, you might not need the false front with an undermount. If you have definitely decided on metal slides, I would go with the Blum Blumotion undermounts. I cannot imagine seeing side mount slides on a sideboard of this quality. In my opinion, they would look out of place. At least with the undermounts, you can't see them when the drawer is open, unless you get down on your hands and knees. They are a bit finicky to install, and require very careful planning of the dimensions of the drawer. Whatever you do, get the slides in hand before you build the drawers. You can download the specs and installation diagrams from Blum's website. I will be anxious to see how you proceed.

Hope this helps.

Matt
 

Jeremy Scuteri

Jeremy
Staff member
Corporate Member
Mike,
... If you use metal slides, you will need to construct the drawer, then add a false front, although if you do some careful planning, you might not need the false front with an undermount...
Matt
I have used the Blum undermount drawer slides on a previous project. I liked them, but I don't see any way to use them without adding false fronts.
 

mlzettl

Matt
Corporate Member
I have used the Blum undermount drawer slides on a previous project. I liked them, but I don't see any way to use them without adding false fronts.
Ron,

I have also used them, and I believe that it could be done without a false front. You would need to extend the lower edge of the front down enough to conceal the mechanism that attaches to the drawer bottom and front, and this would certainly interfere with the appearance, although not the function, of the dovetails. Of course, using a false front is much easier, as all of the reveals can be set pretty precisely after the drawer is in place. Also, there would be no need for the half blind dovetails, which simplify things as well. The Blumotion slides do have adjustment capabilities to set the reveal, so that point may be moot. The only advantage to not using a false front would be appearance when the drawer is open. It would look almost like, and I emphasize "almost," a traditional drawer fitted into the case. With the false front, as soon as the drawer is opened, it is obviously a false front. But, I believe I'm nit-picking for the sake of discussion. ;)

I would also like to add that Pete brings up another excellent option referring to the approach by Christian Becksvoort. He is certainly someone to listen seriously to, as his craftsmanship is superb, and he has a practical, common sense approach that I certainly appreciate. The referenced article is worth a read.

Matt
 

Jeremy Scuteri

Jeremy
Staff member
Corporate Member
I see your point Matt and I agree with you. When I first got the Blum undermount drawer slides I had planned on using half blind dovetails on the drawer front for that "traditional look". I was a little disappointed when I realized that wasn't an option.
 

Shamrock

New User
Michael
Matt, Jeremy, and Pete,

All good options and great discussion. Showing that great minds think alike I am actually leaning toward the undermount with half-blinds with the modification that there will be a lip on the bottom to hide the slides. The interesting thing here is that there would have to be a lip on a conventional piston fit type drawer if I didn't want a divider that you could see from the front. (i.e the front part of the frame from the internal drawer box would not show)

With this in mind I had actually already ordered a set of the KV Muv slides which are very similair to the Blum Blumotion slides to experiment with. I'll have to build a test drawer and play around a bit but I think I'll be able to get the look and feel I want (people love the self closing slides!) Now I may end up going with the blumotion slides simply because as Matt says they do offer lateral side to side adjustment from the hinge and I don't know if the KV's do or not. So I'll keep you posted, the slides should be here today or Thurs.

Thanks for all the great pointers
 

Jeremy Scuteri

Jeremy
Staff member
Corporate Member
... Now I may end up going with the blumotion slides simply because as Matt says they do offer lateral side to side adjustment from the hinge and I don't know if the KV's do or not...
The blum hardware that I used did not have lateral adjustment, there was depth, height and tilt adjustments on the locking mechanisms though. I just did a quick search and it looks like they have added lateral adjustment as a new feature. That would have been nice to have.

http://www.drawerslides.com/control/ViewSimpleContent?dataResourceId=S1-22844
 
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