trim shaping problem

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skeeter

New User
Charles
I am trying to figure out how to match some trim for a piece I'm working on. I need 25' of OAK 3/4 X 1 1/2 with a 3/4" bull nose type curve on each side. I could just use a bull nose router bit, but it would leave a flat spot between curves. I could also cut a bull nose on each piece, rip it to dimension, sand it down and glue everything up, probably with biscuits. That would be approx. 50 ' plus more time than I want to put into the trim.

Sorry about the picture quality, but this is what I'm trying for.

http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/data/321/medium/molding_001.JPG




Thanks for any suggestions!
 

walnutjerry

Jerry
Senior User
Charles--------That is a tough one to match with router bits. To get a perfect match would mean having a millwork company grind a knife to profile--------that is EXPENSIVE.

It may be possible to modify a router bit so as not to leave a flat in the center of the face.

Give Rick a shout (The Woodworking Source). His expertise could offer the solution.

Any way you do it there is going to be time involved--------how do you want to spend your time? Shaping with a standard bit and gluing up or modifying a bit to match, shaping and sanding?

Good luck with it, Jerry
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
Last edited:

skeeter

New User
Charles
Thanks guys. Jerry, you're right, it's going to take time. Jack, I think I'm going to try the second bit and just round-over the ends. I appreciate the suggestions.
 

ehpoole

Administrator
Ethan
Just a question, but if you have the ability to shape just one of the bullnoses effectively, could you not simply create each half of the profile independently (half-width)? Then simply glue the two bullnoses back together again to form the double profile you are seeking?

There is no shame in cheating if it works (at least not in woodworking).

Just a thought...
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
If any "creative" solution to a PIA problem resolves the issue then there is NO CHEATING :rotflm::rotflm: If it works WE R GENIUSES :gar-Bi:gar-Bi
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
Glenn; I believe u r a fellow Joisyian, WE always follow a precise,superbly engineered,highly detailed, plan, It is "The Whatever Works", Whatever makes the boat float" theory.
Then we ferget whut we did and have to do it all over again, the thunkin part
:rotflm::rotflm::rotflm::rotflm::gar-La;:gar-La;
 

petebucy4638

Pete
Senior User
I am trying to figure out how to match some trim for a piece I'm working on. I need 25' of OAK 3/4 X 1 1/2 with a 3/4" bull nose type curve on each side. I could just use a bull nose router bit, but it would leave a flat spot between curves. I could also cut a bull nose on each piece, rip it to dimension, sand it down and glue everything up, probably with biscuits. That would be approx. 50 ' plus more time than I want to put into the trim.

Sorry about the picture quality, but this is what I'm trying for.

http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/data/321/medium/molding_001.JPG




Thanks for any suggestions!
I done quite a few historical renovations where we had to match up multiple moldings. I can tell you from years of doing this sort of things that the best way is to let a shop make a set of knives for you. Basic shapes can be done with a router, shaper, or a molding machine, but anything that is not a stock shape can be a real dog to do. I've seen a lot of wood ruined trying to match a profile with stock bits and cutters.

We used to deal with a building supply that kept cutters that sometimes went back over 60 years. They filed them based on the address of the home. It was amazing to see the very cutters that had been sued to make the original moldings before I was even born. They specialized in making replacement double hung wood windows.
 

Glennbear

Moderator
Glenn
Glenn; I believe u r a fellow Joisyian, WE always follow a precise,superbly engineered,highly detailed, plan, It is "The Whatever Works", Whatever makes the boat float" theory.
Then we ferget whut we did and have to do it all over again, the thunkin part
:rotflm::rotflm::rotflm::rotflm::gar-La;:gar-La;
You are correct Jack, I am indeed a NJ refugee. In NJ I would use whatever materials/tools I had on hand to avoid fighting traffic for an hour to get to a supply house. Now that I am in rural VA I find myself doing the same thing because supply houses are 40+ miles away and would also entail a 1 hour journey. :gar-La;
 
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