Screwing and Gluing Joints

patlaw

Mike
Corporate Member
I heard something recently that I totally don’t understand. If you are going to screw and glue a joint together, don’t put the screw in until after the glue dries. It seems to me that putting the screw in after the glue is dry could actually cause movement in the joint that breaks the glue bond.

I just built some shelves out of plywood. The shelves are in dadoes, but I think adding screws might not be a bad idea. I don’t have enough clamps to clamp every joint, so I was thinking screws would hold the joint until the glue dries. What do you think?
 

Dave Richards

Dave
Senior User
With a decent glue joint, screws are unlikely to break the jointif the proper pilot and shank holes (if the screws have shanks are drilled. If the holes aren't drilled properly or you use screws without shanks, there's a potential to jack the joint open when the screws are driven in before the glue cures.

If you pre-drill for the screws and drill properly, you shouldn't have any problem.
 

Dreuxgrad

Ed
Senior User
I think I'd have to be shown that installation post adhering would be detrimental.
I use a nail gun frequently as an addition to clamping.`
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I don’t know the “proper” way to do anything, I can’t even get up off the floor anymore. But, I can tell you that I have glued butt, rabbet, and dado joints then drilled and driven screws while the glue was still dripping wet. Of course I drilled the right size holes like Dave said. I never had any problems doing it this way. The joints held up for decades with plenty of playful kids abuse. I really don’t see why that advise was given. But, like I said there’s a lot I don’t know and Kant do.
 

zapdafish

Steve
Senior User
i assumed the screw was working as the clamp so you could continue working without waiting for the glue to cure for a few hrs. At least thats how I treat the Kreg pocket holes. You just have to not care about holes or visible screw heads.
 

red

Papa Red
Red
Senior User
I glue and screw it all at the same time. The screw is your permanent clamp.

Red
 

ScottM

Scott
Staff member
Corporate Member
I have made face frames with a Kreg pocket jig and screwed them together while the glue was wet. I have also used V-nails on picture frames and did that while the glue was wet. As already stated make an instant and permanent clamp.
 

Drew

Drew Goodson
User
I heard something recently that I totally don’t understand. If you are going to screw and glue a joint together, don’t put the screw in until after the glue dries. It seems to me that putting the screw in after the glue is dry could actually cause movement in the joint that breaks the glue bond.

I just built some shelves out of plywood. The shelves are in dadoes, but I think adding screws might not be a bad idea. I don’t have enough clamps to clamp every joint, so I was thinking screws would hold the joint until the glue dries. What do you think?
Clearly this is a reason (excuse) to buy more clamps!
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
As Dave and Mike said, the key is to predrill so that you don't "jack" the joint apart. Screws work well for ensuring a dadoed shelf gets fully seated into the dado while the glue dries, and can be removed afterwards if desired. Its best not to overtighten the screws to avoid ending up with a "starved" glue joint.
 

zdorsch

Zach
Senior User
The only reason for waiting until glue dries would be to maybe reduce the two board slipping at the glue joint. But this seems a bit excessive and remedied with proper clamping and not overdriving screws.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
The only real issue is over torquing the joint. The TiteBond manufacturer posted a pretty extensive video on gluing joints on YouTube.
The gist I got from it is do not over torque the joint 200 lbs of clamping on a joint is all that is needed. More can can cause undue stress causing cracking on the board .......
I actually had this happen to me requiring epoxy fill a month later to fix. IT was because of that experience I went to figure out what did I do wrong.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
I never use screws with proper joinery, only glue.
The glue is stronger than the wood and every time I have done tests on cut-off pieces from glued joints over the years, in all cases the piece did not break on the joint.

Artisan built furniture with good joinery should have no screws.

If using glue though simply to reinforce a joint (example a pocket screw cabinet face frame) the glue is never dry, there is no waiting time to pocket screw
 

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