Post what you're building..

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
A reproduction of a John Townsend tall case clock originally built in 1765, the original clock lives in the Met in NYC. It's one of the very few pieces that have been signed by John Townsend himself.

The clock is constructed from Mahogany as the primary and Poplar as the secondary. I modeled the clock in Sketchup using photo's from the Met and some photo's I took during a visit to the Met. It is easily the hardest piece I have every built.

It's not the best picture I have ever taken, the clock is so tall (98 1/4"), invariably I am always taking pictures of the lights in the shop because of the height. The clock currently has a dummy dial and movement, I think (?) I have a well known clock maker building a 18th century movement and brass dial for this case.



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That is awesome!
Can you post some more pictures? maybe some close-ups of the hood and foot / feet?
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
Thank you, I added a couple of photo's to the original post. I am not quite sure I got the hang of adding inline photo's on this forum...
Yup!
that worked - your "pictures" are in the post as links rather than pictures. (not a big deal, but not intuitive either)
I usually drag and drop when I am on the computer - not to handy with the phone and since I am using an Iphone the new HEIC format is not supported by the software and needs to be converted... just one more thing...
 

Mountain City Bill

Mountain City Bill
Corporate Member
Rolling pin and snowmen. My big project is re-roofing, wiring and insulating my shop.
 

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Martin Roper

Martin
Senior User
I assembled the top of the workbench I've been building (slowly). It has two coats of shellac which turned out much darker than I had thought it would.

Getting 100+ lbs. of 30mm MDF onto the frame was quite an adventure. I slid the torsion box on 2x4s from the sawhorses I was building it on onto the frame by sliding it a few inches at a time.

The torsion box is bolted down at the four corners and can be removed in the future if necessary. I just laid the MFT-style top on for now. It will get screwed down at several points through holes I'll counterbore into the top.

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In time there will be a vise on the end to the left and a box of drawers accessible from the other side.
 

David Turner

David
Corporate Member
A reproduction of a John Townsend tall case clock originally built in 1765, the original clock lives in the Met in NYC. It's one of the very few pieces that have been signed by John Townsend himself.

The clock is constructed from Mahogany as the primary and Poplar as the secondary. I modeled the clock in Sketchup using photo's from the Met and some photo's I took during a visit to the Met. It is easily the hardest piece I have every built.

It's not the best picture I have ever taken, the clock is so tall (98 1/4"), invariably I am always taking pictures of the lights in the shop because of the height. The clock currently has a dummy dial and movement, I think (?) I have a well known clock maker building a 18th century movement and brass dial for this case.



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Robert: The Townsend reproduction clock is absolutely gorgiuus !
A reproduction of a John Townsend tall case clock originally built in 1765, the original clock lives in the Met in NYC. It's one of the very few pieces that have been signed by John Townsend himself.

The clock is constructed from Mahogany as the primary and Poplar as the secondary. I modeled the clock in Sketchup using photo's from the Met and some photo's I took during a visit to the Met. It is easily the hardest piece I have every built.

It's not the best picture I have ever taken, the clock is so tall (98 1/4"), invariably I am always taking pictures of the lights in the shop because of the height. The clock currently has a dummy dial and movement, I think (?) I have a well known clock maker building a 18th century movement and brass dial for this case.



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Robert: The reproduction of the Townsend tall case clock is wonderful! Keep up the great period work you are doing.
 

Rick Mainhart

Rick
Senior User
Good morning all,

Finished up a Charcuterie board (center photo) using Maple, Walnut, Cherry, Ash, Purple Heart, and Padauk.

Messed up cutting the ends, and used the cutoffs to make six matching coasters (left photo).

Right photo is a slope-sided serving tray that will hold two 9x13 or one 10x15 casserole dish. All walnut. Bottom is a three-piece resawn panel.

These were items our daughter asked me to make ... and loved the coasters as an added hidden surprise!

Regards,

Rick
 

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bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
The crispness of the exposed pores on the flats seemed to reflect the use of a well sharpened hand plane, but I wasn't sure if you did the whole octagon with a hand plane or not. I know that I couldn't.
 

pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
The crispness of the exposed pores on the flats seemed to reflect the use of a well sharpened hand plane, but I wasn't sure if you did the whole octagon with a hand plane or not. I know that I couldn't.
I used a corrugated sole #4 with a PVM11 iron. If I didn’t have that blank, I would have gone from square to octagon with a hand plane. It’s actually quite easy after you pencil some guide lines on the square blank about 1/4 of the way in from each edge. Try it on some scrap and you’ll see. A board with a longitudinal V groove is useful for holding the stock.
 
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bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
I've "sort of" done an octagonal before but it was a little more wavy than I liked. Whatever the method, that eight sided handle won't roll around on the bench.
 

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