Post what you're building..

Bear Republic

Steve
Corporate Member
My last week and last night. Made a quick cornhole boards for a client. Might have been a NC State fan.....
IMG_20211028_222052.jpg

and Last night I was starting out on a prototype of Bottle openers, I'll share the finished product.
IMG_20211104_160252942.jpg
 

MTod

Michael
User
The posts and top are pressure treated. The lattice is red grandís, which is supposed to be nicely weather resistant. Lattice is half lapped and tenoned, then screwed to the treated posts. No finish on it. Just going to let it grey and perform a natural experiment on the grandis.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Today I finished up some clamps for gluing finger joints. Finger joints allows making long sticks out of short ones. The problem is getting the clamping pressure enough plus keeping things from buckling. These clamps seem to fit the bill and keeps things straight. Finger joints, properly done, are quite strong but look awful. To get long lengths, that's the price of admission. I made the body out of some salvaged aluminum U-channel.

1    compression clamp - 1.jpg
All four clamping rigs
1    compression clamp - 2.jpg
Detail on the actual clamping mechanism. 3/4" steel rod with 7/16-14 all thread as the screw. The 3/4" steel rods are held in with snap rings.
1    compression clamp - 3.jpg
Operator's view. Access is there to get a wrench in easily. The oak blocking filler is there to allow easy clamping.
1    compression clamp - 4.jpg
1/4" ratchet + adaptor + 11/16 socket to tighten things
1    compression clamp - 5.jpg
Overall view. 4 C-clamps clamp against the wood and clamp. I will use more robust clamps in the future, but these clamps held well enough for my test.
1    compression clamp - 6.jpg
the finger joint itself extends about 6" under the longer clamp half.

1    compression clamp - 7.jpg
A better perspective

1    compression clamp - 9.jpg
Tightening the 7/16 nut. This provides enough compression to squeeze the glue out of the finger joint.
The green painted stock is some salvaged wood I used to experiment with.

1    compression clamp - 10.jpg

the threaded rod folds inside the clamp for storage.

1    compression clamp - 11.jpg
All for sets ready to go to the storage shelf.
 

Martin Roper

Martin
Senior User
Progress on my workbench/outfeed table/assembly table build:

Final mock-up
1636422595072.jpeg


The top will be a sort of torsion box made up of 30mm (5/4) Valchromat for the top, sides and internal supports and 19mm (3/4") for the bottom. It will be glued and screwed and should be very strong. The MFT-style top is in the background. The top will just be screwed down and can be flipped at some point in the future.

1636422955040.jpeg


Note that the nearest side piece in the bottom picture is actually made up of a number of pieces. My first one was one piece and I cut the openings with a jigsaw and made a jig for a flush trim bit to finish out the openings. Unfortunately, I forgot to tighten down the clamp on one side of my jig and I gouged the workpiece so badly I had to toss it. I made the piece you see there with the scraps I had left over from the 30mm sheet. :rolleyes:

The final dimensions will be 60"x33"x35-1/8".
 

ConwayCustoms

Rory
Senior User
Installed most of the ceiling track for my sliding partition. Flame/fire retardant vinyl curtain, 10' x 25'.

Tracks are 8' 16 gauge. Solid and heavy.

Purchased items from strip-curtains & tarpsnow.

Also, replaced the standard garage lightbulbs with 5000k 150w 16,200 lumen LED lights. I really like these. Such a great improvement. Little pricey, but the size, build quality, and warranty are phenomenal.
Purchased on Amazon...and I'm kicking myself, because I'm just now realizing I didn't use the Smile website, so we can get a percentage of the sale.
 

Attachments

  • PXL_20211112_215013953.MP.jpg
    PXL_20211112_215013953.MP.jpg
    3.7 MB · Views: 26
  • PXL_20211112_215051040.MP.jpg
    PXL_20211112_215051040.MP.jpg
    5.4 MB · Views: 24
  • PXL_20211112_222622597.MP.jpg
    PXL_20211112_222622597.MP.jpg
    4.5 MB · Views: 24
  • PXL_20211112_222627400.MP~2.jpg
    PXL_20211112_222627400.MP~2.jpg
    1.4 MB · Views: 23
  • PXL_20211113_173058986.PORTRAIT.jpg
    PXL_20211113_173058986.PORTRAIT.jpg
    1.8 MB · Views: 23
  • PXL_20211113_195912911.PORTRAIT~2.jpg
    PXL_20211113_195912911.PORTRAIT~2.jpg
    1.8 MB · Views: 24
  • PXL_20211113_174724150.MP~2.jpg
    PXL_20211113_174724150.MP~2.jpg
    3.6 MB · Views: 23
  • PXL_20211113_195842534.PORTRAIT.jpg
    PXL_20211113_195842534.PORTRAIT.jpg
    1.8 MB · Views: 28
  • PXL_20211113_185339495.MP~3.jpg
    PXL_20211113_185339495.MP~3.jpg
    1.8 MB · Views: 28
  • Screenshot_20211113-231052~2.png
    Screenshot_20211113-231052~2.png
    1.1 MB · Views: 27

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
I got suckered into making one of those a couple of weeks back...... one of my son's friends agreed to make one for somebody. So they walked into my shop with two pressure-treated 2x4's and a story.

Luckily I had a SYP 2x laying around that I ripped down for the sides and then turned the rungs. I'm not an experienced turner so that part was interesting but they came out just fine.

One of the few things I didn't take pics of unfortunately.


Finally got enough shop time to finish these up...
 

KurtB

Kurt
User
Many years ago I built a funky looking cabinet for my wife. It had a half-rounded pediment on top and 4 blocky wooden feet underneath made from fence post tops. It filled a need for storage space and her taste at the time.

We're redoing our master bath and had space for a cabinet. I decided to cut off the pediment top, remove the legs and added a new top and base to the cabinet. Also a coat of paint and hardware.

Nothing spectacular, but it turned out to be a decent little cabinet with 4 adjustable shelves, which are not installed in the pic.

20211105_124153_resized.jpg
20211105_124204_resized.jpg
 

creasman

Board of Directors, Development Director
Jim
Staff member
Corporate Member
I recently finished a few simple hangers for the door of a tool cabinet. These provide storage for a couple of panel gauges and my LN backsaws. Previously, the gauges were hanging by a hook and banging around whenever the door was opened or closed. The saws were in a drawer. Much happier with the new arrangement.

IMG_3121.JPG
 
Last edited:

Bill_L

Bill
Senior User
I'm still trying to perfect the Morris Board. I resawed a piece of sapele and created 2 boards. One will have walnut inlay, the other birch. My 1/2" plug cutter isn't great so the birch plugs didn't fit well (pic not included). I'm going to have to move up to 5/8" (like that size better anyway) and drill 24 new holes.

And I'm making a cutting board for a friend. It was going to be ash with a maple border but the maple was too plain. I think the walnut w/ sapwood highlights the ash really well. The board was sanded to 60 grit and I just sprayed some water on it to get a sense of what it will look like. I still have a lot more sanding and have to add the juice groove.
 

Attachments

  • 65846917496--1EFD59E7-C039-4B56-8BC7-0937F4A14C92.jpg
    65846917496--1EFD59E7-C039-4B56-8BC7-0937F4A14C92.jpg
    2 MB · Views: 28
  • 65846918719--0F22AA0C-9BE7-49A2-95CB-C960D898C603.jpg
    65846918719--0F22AA0C-9BE7-49A2-95CB-C960D898C603.jpg
    2.4 MB · Views: 28
  • IMG-3726.jpg
    IMG-3726.jpg
    2.7 MB · Views: 29

Bill_L

Bill
Senior User
Sorry, What is a Morris Board?
Attached a picture. It's like tic-tac-toe but with a lot more strategy. You alternate placing your 'men' on the board and if you get three in a row - you get to remove one of your opponent's 'men'. There are 9 men each though there are variations of the game that include 10 men.

I chose to inlay different woods vs. epoxy (though I plan to make an epoxy board soon). I need to be better on the lathe to make interesting pieces (vs. 1" dowels). Know anyone good on the lathe ;-).

 

Attachments

  • Morris_board_sapale.jpg
    Morris_board_sapale.jpg
    3.3 MB · Views: 13

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
Attached a picture. It's like tic-tac-toe but with a lot more strategy. You alternate placing your 'men' on the board and if you get three in a row - you get to remove one of your opponent's 'men'. There are 9 men each though there are variations of the game that include 10 men.

I chose to inlay different woods vs. epoxy (though I plan to make an epoxy board soon). I need to be better on the lathe to make interesting pieces (vs. 1" dowels). Know anyone good on the lathe ;-).

Sounds like a fun project
 

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top