New shop suggestions

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
It will be insulated.... The CFO and I still discussing HVAC. Will likely be a mini split.

I thought about running lines in the floor for electrical and dust but ruled it out. I don't want to do anything that will impact it's use as a garage in the future.
 

AllanD

Allan
Senior User
Make a separate room for dust collection and air compressor. I luckily was able to build the woodshop part of mine over a basement so that is where they are in mine.
The most important element or component is air conditioning. Minisplits are a little more expensive but easier to install and are very efficient.
 

DSWalker

David
Corporate Member
It will be insulated.... The CFO and I still discussing HVAC. Will likely be a mini split.

I thought about running lines in the floor for electrical and dust but ruled it out. I don't want to do anything that will impact it's use as a garage in the future.
The mini splits are very inexpensive, easy to install and efficient. Building a $30-$40k shop and not spending an extra $1000 for the comfort seemed just silly to me. My shop is 24x24 and is easily cooled and heated with mine. Barely saw an increase on the utility bill.

I scanned craigslist and marketplace throughout the build and picked up 'leftover' insulation for less than half the retail price. Ended up with R30 in almost all the walls plus of course the ceiling.
 

ScottM

Scott
Staff member
Corporate Member
Installation in walls and ceiling is a must. In my opinion so is OSB on the walls instead of sheetrock. It allows you to hang things just about anywhere. Just make sure you paint the OSB. Makes it much brighter.
 

Bigdog72

Moderator
Geoff
Insulation is a must have. My shop is 14x24 and I can’t keep it warm in the winter and cool in the summer. It’s insulated except for the floor. Plan the work flow and then place your tools. Also, an 8’ garage door is a plus for getting material in and projects out.
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
Don't skimp on lighting, electrical, and flooring. You can always redo walls, but once you put the tools in, that's it. Something other than concrete will be a lot better on your feet, and easier to clean. Since you want it to be a garage in the future, consider those garage tiles with coin pattern (expensive), or go with a floating floor like vinyl plank that's easy to take out.

If possible, create some sort of patio behind the shop where you can break down sheet goods, work outside on nice days, etc.
 

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
I am planning on osb for the walls. It will be insulated but I hadn't considered the floor.

I'll never use it as a garage but just thinking about the next owner. I don't want to do anything that will limit the functionality.
 

smallboat

smallboat
Corporate Member
Think about storage for raw materials, work in progress and finishing. Unless you have convenient storage in a separate space.
Also, access to get materials in and out. I work in a similar sized metal building, nothing fancy just a up purposed storage building. We have full width overhead doors on each end. Very convenient and the workflow is pretty much in one end and out the other.
 

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
I talked with the concrete guy yesterday and the pad should be poured end of this week or first of next.... I'm so ready to get this going.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
If possible 9-10 foot framed walls a little more but wow, how that extra height helps you move 8' stock

..... and yes always insulate and if you can afford HVAC, split systems are the easiest and really the cheapest.

One trick, alot of the supply houses will sell their dinged units really really cheap. I got a 3ton system for 600 bucks,

But you got to got to the large contractor supply warehouses that are not national franchises. I manage Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing (MEP) Projects for a MEP Contractor. So, I am in that world every day.

I am moving next month and will build a new workshop, so I am interested in how yours progresses.
 

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
My brother in law runs a local electric supply house so that'll help save me some $$$.

If possible 9-10 foot framed walls a little more but wow, how that extra height helps you move 8' stock

..... and yes always insulate and if you can afford HVAC, split systems are the easiest and really the cheapest.

One trick, alot of the supply houses will sell their dinged units really really cheap. I got a 3ton system for 600 bucks,

But you got to got to the large contractor supply warehouses that are not national franchises. I manage Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing (MEP) Projects for a MEP Contractor. So, I am in that world every day.

I am moving next month and will build a new workshop, so I am interested in how yours progresses.
 

Jeremy Scuteri

Jeremy
Staff member
Corporate Member
Here are my suggestions in no particular order:

1. Lots of lights. I thought I may have put in too many lights at first, now I'm glad that I did.
2. Lots of 110V and 220V outlets (20 Amp). I alternated 110V and 220V outlets in the shop so I would always have an outlet nearby if I add machines or decide to move existing machines.
a. I've heard of people running all of their 220V circuits with 10AWG wire so circuits can easily be changed to 30A if needed.
b. Install a surface mounted sub panel for future electrical work. Will prevent the need to get into the walls if you have a flush mounted main panel.
3. Taller than 8' ceilings. Need room for lights and dust collection pipe on the ceiling. I'd go with 9' minimum and 10' would be preferable.
4. Paint your walls white. It really brightens up the space. OSB or Drywall.
5. Insulation and HVAC. Make the space comfortable to be in.
6. Dust collector and Air Compressor outside of the shop. The biggest reason for me is noise, but it saves space inside the shop too.
7. Double doors to make it easy to bring large items in/out of the shop.
8. I really like having a sink in the shop. Good for washing hands and cleaning items. It can also serve as a drain for a dehumidifier (I think that isn't technically allowed.....).
9. Half bathroom.
10. Floors. Concrete can be hard on backs and knees. I put 1" XPS rigid foam insulation under OSB for the floor. That has worked reasonably well.
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
When I did a major expansion/remodel the electrician suggested running the circuits in surface mounted conduit to allow for flexibility once I started using the shop.

I was more expensive, but I think it was worth it, as I have added/moved some machines it was very easy.
 

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top