New Shop Started

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MarkE

Mark
Corporate Member
Well, after several delays, the new shop build finally got started on Friday, June, 25th.

Because the road behind our house is designated as a 'collector' road (collecting for what, I can't say), we could not build where we (LOML) wanted to. Johnston County has decided that they 'may' want to expand the road to 4 lanes 'someday', so we can't build anything permanent with 100 feet of the center of that road. That works out to about half of our backyard. Unbelievable! :eek:

So we move the building closer to our house. Now we have to deal with setbacks from the side property line (5 feet for an 'attached' building, 10 feet for detached), and also keep the building 5 feet from the end of the septic lines. Keeping 10 feet from the property line would have allowed for an 18' wide building. Not enough for our needs. So we have to get Johnston County to clarify what 'attached' actually means.

We got the word that anything the attaches the new building to the existing building means the new building is attached and only requires a 5 foot setback. So we were good to go with a couple of add-ons.

We have a concrete patio behind the house that we don't really like. LOML had already talked about building a deck over the patio, so that is what we are going to do. The deck will be attached to the house and to the new building. There will also be a walkway from the deck to back of the new building where there will be outside stairs to the upper floor.

Anyway, here are a couple of pics of the very early progress. I will attempt to get pictures as the project progresses.

Garage-Shop_010.JPG




 

red

Papa Red
Red
Senior User
That is a good feeling when the concrete gets poured. What size shop are you building? It's always "fun" when you have to deal with the town.

Red
 

MarkE

Mark
Corporate Member
Thanks, Scott. Pictures will be coming.

Red, the shop is going to be ~23' x 26', 1.5 stories. SWMBO gets most of the second floor.
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
Congratulations on getting started, Mark. I've been in my "new" shop about 5 years now, and from the time the footings went in until I finally got to make sawdust, seemed like forever. And I won't even start on the fun I had w/ the county permit office. :BangHead:

Bill
 

Travis Porter

New User
Travis
Ahhh. The pains and turmoil of building a shop.. I swore i would never do it again, but in retrospect, I would if I could get it bigger.


Keep the pics and updates coming!
 

Trent Mason

New User
Trent Mason
Sorry to hear about the setbacks Mark. :BangHead: But I am glad that you got it figured out and that construction is underway. :eusa_danc:eusa_danc:eusa_danc Keep us updated. :icon_thum
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
Looking good already. I think you'll like being on a crawlspace instead of a slab. I've run wiring and duct work to tools in the middle of the shop without having extension cords everywhere. So nice! :thumbs_up

Bill
 

red

Papa Red
Red
Senior User
At this rate, you will be in the shop working by the 4th of July! Great pics. Keep us posted.

Red
 

MarkE

Mark
Corporate Member
Things are moving along pretty well. Inspector came by this morning and gave his approval.
Next is leveling out inside the foundation and termite treatment. After that, the construction can move on.

Looking good already. I think you'll like being on a crawlspace instead of a slab. I've run wiring and duct work to tools in the middle of the shop without having extension cords everywhere. So nice! :thumbs_up

Bill

Bill, sure would like to get some info from you on what you used for outlets in the middle of the floor. I want to have at least one 220 and a couple of 110 circuits out in the floor.

Also, if you have any pictures of your under-floor DC ducting, that would be great.

I am considering running all the DC under the floor. Anyone have any pros and cons to doing that?

Thanks everyone.
 

Jim Kunzweiler

New User
Jim
The shop is looking pretty nice.

As to dust collection under the floor, I think that's a great idea. Wish I had it. I would lay it out such that clean-outs are accessible near your crawl space opening. Unlike overhead pipe under floor is more apt to clog... but I still would prefer it over pipe on the ceiling. It's a much nicer look.

Mid shop electrical is a real nice feature too. I wouldn't put the outlets in the floor... they tend to collect dust (fire hazard ). What I did on mine was to place 18" long heavy 2" steel pipes on flanges bolted to the floor and run the wires up the pipe and through the back of your receptacles. When you frame the floor you can run a piece of conduit (with a long sweep 90's) from the center of the room to the wall. If you do that in a couple of places then no matter how your arrange your shop you're never too far from power ... 220 or 110. You can't have too many receptacles in a shop. I just recently added four overhead drop cords that are just six inches above head height. Now when I go to plug in a tool the cords are not draped across the bench or floor. The big box stores sell receptacles that are for heavy duty extension cords that are good for that.

Hope it continues to go well.
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
Bill, sure would like to get some info from you on what you used for outlets in the middle of the floor. I want to have at least one 220 and a couple of 110 circuits out in the floor.

Also, if you have any pictures of your under-floor DC ducting, that would be great.

I am considering running all the DC under the floor. Anyone have any pros and cons to doing that?

Thanks everyone.

Once I had all my equipment placed in what I consider a "permanent" location, I ran circuits to a central location for each piece, or groups of pieces. Ex: my jointer and planer, both 220v, are back-to-back, so I ran a circuit up between them, then continued it on to my Unisaw, also 220v. I considered it unlikely I would ever be running any two of those at the same time and overloading that 20a circuit. Once I ran the cable up through the floor, I went into a metal junction box. I then removed the plugs from the machine cords, and hard-wired them into the circuit. I used cable connectors to make sure they would not be accidentally pulled out of the junction box. Then to make sure sawdust would not get into the box and possibly cause a fire, I caulked all possible openings to the box and sealed it w/ a metal lid. I do not have any "receptacles" in the floor. I did not want to worry about them filling up w/ dust and leading to a spark, although they make floor receptacles w/ built-in covers. Everything is hard-wired in. I've probably violated 3 or 4 provisions of the NEC, and I'm sure I'll hear about it, but it's been 5 years now and I haven't had a single problem.

As for running all your DC under the floor, that might not be the best idea. Some machines are better suited for overhead collection. In my case, the planer and dual drum sander would have been awkward to run underfloor. Since my planer and jointer are back-to-back, I went ahead and connected them to the same overhead trunk line.

For those machines where I ran the ducting underfloor, the blast gate was the biggest concern. The duct itself was fairly simple: just run a vertical line under the floor, then use a sweep (not a 90* elbow) to turn up through the floor. Once the duct emerged through the floor, I had to find a way to incorporate a blast gate, and still be able to open and close it w/ ease. The table saws were the hardest to work out. I'll try to take a couple of pics tomorrow showing the DC coming up from underfloor and post them tomorrow night. I just looked at the shop pics in my gallery, and none of them really show what I'm talking about.

Sorry for the long winded response.

Bill
 

MarkE

Mark
Corporate Member
Thanks for that info, Bill. I will probably just run electric under the floor and hang the DC pipe from the ceiling.
 
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