My first attempt at turning a bowl and a mushroom

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Sam Knight

Sam Knight
Sam
Corporate Member
Here is my first ever bowl. It was made from ash that was cut into a bowl blank back in march. My wife likes the natural edge bowls so that is what I attempted. It is in a bag with shaving now, hopefully it will not warp much but we will see. I need to get a small weigh scale to weigh as the moisture content drops. Any recommendations on a scale, or do you prefer another drying method?
Also turned a mushroom for practice. It is from a hickory limb. I think it turned out pretty nice. Coated with some boiled linseed oil (what I had on-hand).
What is your go to finish on bowls and other turnings?
As I am new and venturing into turning I appreciate and welcome all your constructive comments. I really enjoyed my time on the lathe making these and learned a lot. One big thing is I need to spend more time cutting out the blanks on the band saw. The blanks I cut are not really circular as I eye-balled them so most are kind of oval. I have some cardboard for some circle cut outs that I plan on using next time in the blank preparations. One other thing is I need more sandpaper and much higher grits. The highest I have now is 220.
Thanks for looking guys and gals
 

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aplpickr

New User
Bill
The bowl will probably go more oval as it dries. Do you plan on re-turning after it is dry? If you are, did you leave your reference points, so that you can get back to center as much as possible? Most turners leave original thickness at 10% of diameter to allow enough to get it round after re-turning. The almost square corner at the inside can promote cracking. Using a "continental" bowl gouge grind can relieve the difficulty of removing a square corner. Always keep your first bowl. You will be amazed by it in a few years! Good job, keep spinning, have fun!
 

CrealBilly

Jeff
Senior User
I like your carvings of the mushrooms very much. Very cool. I'd like to give carving a try sometime.
My methods are very midevil. I mainly use a hunting knife to rough everything out then an assortment of razor blades to scrape and detail. I dont remember if I used any sand paper but I dont think I did.

Good way to kill time in the winter, sitting of the porch whittling.

Support your local musicians
 

Danagawa

New User
D
I buy my sandpaper from the big bins at klingspor. They sell it by the pound. It is super cheap. Get the kind with the cloth backing(usually yellow or green). There is usually some high grit in there(up to 500 or so) if u dig a little
 

cyclopentadiene

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Significantly better than my first bowl. You even went with the challenge of natural edge which is the mist difficult. That is great with your first attempt not to lose the bark!
 

CommGuy107

New User
Dan
Good job, man! Hopefully the "bug" will let you drive by the occasional neighbor downing a tree. It hasn't for me. It seems I can't pass a pear or tulip tree on the ground without asking for a big branch or two...
 

Sam Knight

Sam Knight
Sam
Corporate Member
Dan, I find myself riding down the road looking at trees that are still upright wondering what it looks like on the inside. If it would make an interesting turning of some sort. Still very much in the infant stages of learning to identify trees.
Good job, man! Hopefully the "bug" will let you drive by the occasional neighbor downing a tree. It hasn't for me. It seems I can't pass a pear or tulip tree on the ground without asking for a big branch or two...
 

woodArtz

New User
Bob
Great start! Keep 'em spinning. Natural edge can be a challenge, but is soooo cool when it works.
 
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