Machine cleaning & waxing

SBeaudrot

New User
Steve
Hello All,
I am looking to see if there are better products and techniques in cleaning table tops and waxing them. Currently none of my machines have any rust on them. I try hard to keep them rust free.

Currently I use mineral spirits to clean them with, then use Mequiars ultimate compound to shine and wax. Works ok, but leaves black streaks on wood. My thought are either its not fulling dried when using the machines or there is a little oil/grease/residue still in metal.

Any Suggestions?
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
Ordinary paste wax works just fine, and is very affordable. For a more high tech solution that can be sprayed, Boshield T-9 is a good option.
Many car wax products contain silicone, which can be a problem with finishing, or in your case, leave black streaks.

What are you applying the compound/ mineral spirits with? Cloth shop towels seem to work best for me to really do a deep clean, paper towels don't absorb elbow grease very well :)
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
I use ordinary Johnsons paste wax.

Not sure about mineral spirits that could be the issue. I clean with acetone or brake cleaner.
 
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Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
cleaning table tops and waxing them.
A little rust isn't necessarily that bad? What's the mineral spirits supposed to do? Remove the old wax?

Your wax is for cars, not woodshop tools like a table saw. It probably has something in it that's leaving the black streaks on your wood. Johnson's paste wax is fine for metal.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
On my Table saw and Band saw, I use 2-0 steel wool to clean the surface of rust, then Acetone or Alcohol, then Johnson wax. This is something that has to be done 3-4 times a year here. Being close to the Ocean it really takes its toll on steel.
 

Roy G

Roy
Senior User
My shop is a barn, so rust is constantly lurking. I made covers out of plywood for my bandsaw, tablesaw and jointer. Easy to remove and replace and no rust problems.

Roy G
 

bobsmodels

Bob
Senior User
When I purchased my Unisaw in 1977 about the only place you got them was from a commercial supply house that sold machinery of all types. I purchased a 14” bandsaw at the same time. The delivery truck pulls up two big guys get out and carry the saws into the basement, set them up, show me how everything worked and then. Out of a small box they hand me an eraser block for a caulk black board and a container of talcum powder. As best I recall I was told to put the talc on the cast iron tables once a week and rub it in with the eraser for two months. They said the idea was to load up the cast iron. Then apply once every 4 - 6 months. They explained not to use wax because it would transfer to the wood and make finishing difficult. Same guys delivered my powermatic planer and jointer and had a container of talc with them.

That was 40+ years ago and the table tops are in great shape and I was not real good at keeping to the application schedule. Typically if starting a large project I give the tables a once over.

Bob
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
I have my "shop" in the basement with 2 dehumidifiers, a sump pump, and a fan.... keeps humidity below 50% and rust free after 15 year
My shop is in the basement too, basically part of the living space. Rust is not a concern, but I still wax the table saw, jointer etc. to help the wood slide smoothly. Definitely nice not to have to worry about condensation!

I've never had any finishing issues because of wax on the tools. But it's not like there's a greasy layer, I apply a thin coat, let it dry, then buff it out. Even if some if it transfers to the work, the lightest of sanding/ scraping will remove it.
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
My shop is in the basement too, basically part of the living space. Rust is not a concern, but I still wax the table saw, jointer etc. to help the wood slide smoothly. Definitely nice not to have to worry about condensation!

I've never had any finishing issues because of wax on the tools. But it's not like there's a greasy layer, I apply a thin coat, let it dry, then buff it out. Even if some if it transfers to the work, the lightest of sanding/ scraping will remove it.
+1 Bas - keepin’ it simple!
 

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