Luban

drw

Donn
Corporate Member
It is very intriguing what a master-craftsman can achieve with a few rudimentary tools! I wonder what kind of wood he was using?
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Vice President
Hank
Corporate Member
Looks like padauk or Sapele to me...

not sure I understand the long sliding pieces if it is a low tea table???

But Rubio and Roy Underhill would be envious if it held a book!
 

nn4jw

Jim
Senior User
That first video making the tea table just hurts my head. No heavy work bench, no Jet clamps, no table saw, jig saw, or power tools, let alone Festools. No shop for that matter. The best tool he used was his mind, and it was the sharpest tool of all.

Something to think on.
 

nn4jw

Jim
Senior User
Looks like padauk or Sapele to me...

not sure I understand the long sliding pieces if it is a low tea table???

But Rubio and Roy Underhill would be envious if it held a book!

I think it's so the table folds up into something the size of the original chunk of wood for storage.
 

marinosr

Richard
Senior User
AH I love this! Very good reminder for next time I think "I'll need x before I can build y" that probably all I'm lacking is practice.
 

llucas

luke
Senior User
Impressive display of talent....equally impressive display of intergenerational bonding.
 

Martin Roper

Martin
User
That first video making the tea table just hurts my head. No heavy work bench, no Jet clamps, no table saw, jig saw, or power tools, let alone Festools. No shop for that matter. The best tool he used was his mind, and it was the sharpest tool of all.

Something to think on.
AH I love this! Very good reminder for next time I think "I'll need x before I can build y" that probably all I'm lacking is practice.
That's what I got from it.
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
Well you don't need to run off and get an expensive jig to cut tenons. You can do it by hand or with your tablesaw or bandsaw.

Without knowing what toys you have in the shop at this point, I'll explain how I do the tenon part of this joint with the bandsaw/tablesaw when I am cutting lots of tenons the same size.

1. I set up a fence with a stop for depth and cut one side then the other. If your wood stiles/rails are the same thickness, the tenons will be very close to uniform.

2. Set up your crosscut sled on the TS and put a block of wood to get the tenon to size. A little bit of experimenting here.

3. I love to cut my tenons with my japanese saw with just scribe lines. With all the joinery I do with the handsaw this is really just following the line and fitting with a rasp.

4. One closing note: ALWAYS CHOP OR DRILL THE MORTISES FIRST.

I have never owned a biscuit tool or a domino cutter so I have cut my share of M/T joints. If you are only going to cut a half dozen joints maybe this would be the way to go?

1-chopped mortises 001.JPG

Mortises chopped with a mortise chisel. This is 5/16 I think.
x (1).JPG

I have 24 tenons and 24 bridal joints precut in the shop for drawer dividers. I just grab them and fit with no glue to allow for movement.
x (5).JPG


x (17).JPG

2 tables: one built with hand tools and one with the bandsaw.

1-walnut table May 003.JPG

You can see the dividers in use here(3ea) They have been faced with walnut strips in the front and await a little dye work.
 

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top