Jointer snipe

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
I just spent about 30 minutes chasing snipe on my Griz jointer. Aggravating.... mostly because I didn't want to mess with it. And I was being lazy and I knew it

I finally broke down and solved the problem:

PXL_20210817_233131135.jpg


Way easier and quicker. Nice tight joints in about one minute.

PXL_20210817_233028601.jpg


The long board is just a spacer for my jig.

I'm seriously considering selling the power jointer.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
LOL, hand planes are always fun, I love using mine at every opportunity.

Your jointer outfeed table needs to be adjusted, I always forget which way for snipe, I think it is too low.
 

chris_goris

Chris
Senior User
LOL, hand planes are always fun, I love using mine at every opportunity.

Your jointer outfeed table needs to be adjusted, I always forget which way for snipe, I think it is too low.
Too low would make sense Willem.
Chris, adjust your outfeed table to align with the tangent tip of your cutterhead, also make sure both tables are parallel to the cutterhead in the axial direction of the cutterhead.
....... your workpiece is dropping onto the cutterhead after it clears the trailing edge of the infeed table.
 
Last edited:

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Too low would make sense Willem.
Chris, adjust your outfeed table to align with the tangent tip of your cutterhead, also make sure both tables are parallel to the cutterhead in the axial direction of the cutterhead.
....... your workpiece is dropping onto the cutterhead after it clears the trailing edge of the infeed table.
I normally do this every time I replace the cutter blades on the jointer. I do exactly as you described, but then add an extra step. After aligning the outfeed table with the cutter blade edges, I edge joint two 6’ boards and place them together. I normally have to tweak ever so slightly on the outfeed table height, until no daylight shows.
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
I put a LUX head in my jointer. Set it up dead on once and now don't have to think about it, fear a knot or even square up glue-ups.

One more tip, when using the test Willem says, use wide enough boards they can't flex even a tiny bit.

A lot of jointers the infeed needs shimming. Some not really flat. Check everything. I got lucky with my old "Emerson" built Ridgid.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
I put a LUX head in my jointer. Set it up dead on once and now don't have to think about it, fear a knot or even square up glue-ups.

One more tip, when using the test Willem says, use wide enough boards they can't flex even a tiny bit.

A lot of jointers the infeed needs shimming. Some not really flat. Check everything. I got lucky with my old "Emerson" built Ridgid.
I’m still on conventional cutters, maybe one day.

How are those working for you?

What amount of cleanup (sanding) is needed after the jointer for a perfect finish?

Any tearout on figured lumber, such as Curly Maple when jointing the rift grain side edge?
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
Smoother than flat knives, but not ready for glue. If I want a glue line, I still go to my old Bailey for one swipe. But it gets me two flat sides so I can go to the TS and planer. Smoother than the DW735 with Byrd head. A couple swipes with my long block would make it glue-able at the risk of messing up the square. *

Big deal, it is seems every other board I ever ran, wound up with a nicked blade. No more. I can flatten up a plywood glue up. I don't have to spend hours fiddling with getting 3 blades dead on. Gives me the "care free" use of the tool. Only concentrate on safety and not worrying about the tool. ( I need grippier push blocks. )

I have not run any exotics or difficult wood. Oak, Birch, SYP, fir. I have had some tear-out on bad spot, but again, it is to get two flat sides. A glue joint blade on the TS does much better once you have those flat sides.

Anyway, for my expectations, I would never go back. I do still want to upgrade my 735 to a Powermatic 15, but concentrating on hand tools, skills and getting some actual projects done. I think of power tools as getting stock ready to do woodworking. A luxury of a hobby. If I had to feed myself, that would be a very different equation. If I had to feed myself, I would never want to spend the hours sharpening and adjusting flat knives as that does not make money. I would want a bigger machine with a faster head.

If you are ever way up this way, give a shout and come try it.

*Just gave me an idea. If one had the space, they could take an old planer, no cutter, and glue a strip of paper along the bed. Then a couple of manual swipes would give that true glue line allowing for even a bevel. One could make a hand held version like a plane, but paper with a tall flat guide. I am sure it has been done.
 

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
It'll try to fuss with it today... I walked past it a dozen times in the last few days but just didn't have the gumption to work on it. I finished sanded the watch box I was making last night so that project is done. No excuses left....
 

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