insects in turning stock

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llucas

luke
Senior User
hey guys, I am totally new to woodturning and to this site and am in need of advice on found wood storage to keep out the bugs...I have scored some plum (taken from a local backyard) some pecan (HUGE trunk pieces, maybe 2000lbs total), and some other hardwoods. I have anchorsealed the endgrains and stacked outside on pallets, and covered with tarps. Since I am new to turning and don't see me getting to all this stuff for many months, I need to keep the bugs at bay.
Can I spray it with insecticide, or will I just ruin my health when I eventually turn poison laden wood.
 

ScottM

Scott
Staff member
Corporate Member
Hi Luke. Welcome to NCWW. When you get a chance go to the Who We Are Forum and tell us a bit about you.

I would not treat your wood with any insecticide. As soon as you start to turn it the insecticide would become airborne. Yes most ingredients will have become inherit but still not good for the lungs. I have heard of some folks dusting wood with borax and others liquid soap and water. The best bet is to keep it off the ground and covered.

I am sure others will also give you some other ideas.
 

boxxmaker

New User
Ken
You can use any dish soap and mix it pretty thin with water and spray the wood down real good and then cover it with a tarp,that will help control the bugs.as for me i just anchor seal the wood and let nature take its course,I'v gotten some real nice figure and spaulting doing that.:eek:ccasion1
 

llucas

luke
Senior User
guys, thanks for the quick reply...sounds like little work or worry to try the liquid soap, so I think I' get out a clean garden sprayer and have at it tomorrow...maybe that will make it rain...sort of like washing the car and then leaving the windows down.
I turned some of the pecan tonight, and found out why some call it pecancrete....
I am really looking forward to learning from you guys...this looks like a real community with a common interest. Thanks again.
 

ehpoole

Administrator
Ethan
If the storage area is protected from rain and moisture, diatomaceous earth is about the safest insecticide you can possibly use. It is simply the discarded fossilized shell created by diatoms. Essentially, it is equivalent to fine sand.

It is abrasive and cuts into the insect's shell, causing it to dehydrate and die.

Boron is also a safe insecticide, though it is harder to get any safer than sand.
 

llucas

luke
Senior User
Boron and/or diatomaceous earth...thats the same thing some recommend for flea treatment of carpets...great idea....now to find a cheap source. Thanks
 
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