Inquiring about saw mills in eastern nc

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Truefire

New User
Chris
Hi Guys my name is Chris and I am within the next week or two going to cut down a huge Red Oak tree and a Pecan tree. I am planning on drying out the lumber and am wondering if June is a good time to cut the tree down in regards to drying the wood out with ease a little later on. Or should we wait a few more months until the sap begins to fall.

Also, both trees main trunk is approximately 30" in diameter. I want to load the pieces up on a car trailer and have boards cut out of them from a local saw mill. Do you guys know of any on the eastern side of the state and the approximate cost they would charge to handle such logs this size?

Any and all suggestions, advice would be appreciated.

Thanks, Chris
 

DaveO

New User
DaveO
Chris you might want to check with any of these sawyers -
Region 4

Feltz Sawmill

Eric Feltz
903 Myra Road
Raeford NC 28376
(910) 875-5827
(910) 308-7796
Link to the site


Beaver Branch Portable Sawmill
sawing up to 24 ft. long
Ivey Pridgen
Burgaw,N.C.
(910) 259-4777
(910) 540-0705


Region 5

Kevin's Custom Sawing and Furniture
Air dried hardwoods/softwoods and custom portable milling services
Kevin Everett
112 Boyd Loop Rd
Everett's Corner
Beaufort Co.
Tel. (252) 923-0345

That's all I have to offer:icon_scra

Dave:)
 

Alan in Little Washington

Alan Schaffter
Corporate Member
Kevin has a nice portable WoodMizer, really knows how to use it, and charges reasonable fees. He is located in Washington. Not sure how far he will travel, but give him a call.
 

Truefire

New User
Chris
Thanks guys I really appreciate it. I am going to give Kevin at Kevins Custom Sawing and Furniture a call. I would be able to make arrangements to have the wood taken to his place to have it milled. Thanks for the fast reply.:icon_thum
 

Truefire

New User
Chris
When is the best time of the year to cut the trees down in regards to the moisture content. Should I wait until the sap begins to fall. I don't want this wood to check too badly during the drying process.
 

Alan in Little Washington

Alan Schaffter
Corporate Member
When is the best time of the year to cut the trees down in regards to the moisture content. Should I wait until the sap begins to fall. I don't want this wood to check too badly during the drying process.
Chris, I don't think it matters much, but I really don't know. The key to preventing checking (and case hardening) is to treat the ends and don't allow it to dry too fast.

The folks at VA Tech and U of Wisc. are the lumber experts, especially cutting and drying hardwood. Their Forrest Service Products Labs are part of the USDA and they publish a lot excellent stuff, most of which is available for free online. You can't go wrong with anything by them or Dr. Eugene Wengert.

Here is a link to the pdf version of

Air Drying of Lumber
USDA Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory
Madison, Wisconsin


Unfortunately it doesn't address when to cut.

Here is another place to start Forest Service Products Laboratory
 

JackLeg

New User
Reggie
Alan is dead on the money. Get the ends of those logs sealed with Anchor Seal or Baily's Seal, as soon as possible after cutting. This will cut down on checking substantially. If you can't find either of those, get some black rubber type roof sealer and put it on thick.
 
J

jeff...

When is the best time of the year to cut the trees down in regards to the moisture content. Should I wait until the sap begins to fall. I don't want this wood to check too badly during the drying process.
Sap rising and falling is a misnomer - it does neither - it's something to do with photosynthesis. A tree cut off the stump in the dead of winter or in the full of summer will have the same moisture content - less of course there is drought or something weird like that. Bottom Line - it does;t matter there is no better time than others to cut down trees.

When the tree falls off the stump trim the butt cut and apply ancorseal - you can't get it on to soon - the sooner the better. Buck you logs to 16' 6" ~ 17' and again apply ancorseal to the bucked end - let sit a few hours than one dry apply another coat to both ends - 2 thick coats on the log ends does wonders to help prevent end grain splitting and help keep the log wet on the inside.

Now speaking for rubber or tar roofing cement - who ever suggests tar should be taken out back and beaten - that stuff gets all over everything, including the sawmill and sawyer - Tar is a PITA to try and clean up - Ancorseal is a clear wax water based type paint, it's much easier on the sawyer and his equipment. I include a hourly fee for tarred logs - however much time it takes me to clean it up is how much extra I charge - has been as little as an hour to 6 hours at my flat rate of $50.00 per hour.


Thanks
 

Truefire

New User
Chris
Thanks guys, where is a good place to purchase ancorseal or Baily's seal? Can I find it local near Greenville or should I just purchase it online? Any websites cheaper than others? Thanks. Chris
 

scsmith42

New User
Scott Smith
Chris - ditto Jeff's comments. When I obtain a large oak log, I try to apply the end sealer almost immediately after the log is felled, and definitely before moving the log. This one action will do more to provide high quality wood than any other.

Here's the link to end sealer on the Bailey's web site:

http://www.baileysonline.com/search.asp?skw=end+sealer&PageNo=1

Typically, unless you will be milling it right away, if you fell a log during the winter months, you will have less problems with degradation than if you fell it during the hot summer months.

Scott
 

Truefire

New User
Chris
Scott and Jeff thanks a great deal on your advice and helpful information in regards to finding sealants to apply to newly downed logs. Thanks again, Chris:gar-Bi
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
Has anyone ever had success in using tar/rubber & then cutting the ends off just before going through the sawmill?
 

Truefire

New User
Chris
In regards to utilizing the rubber cement on the ends of the lumber (logs) I never have. I am sure it is cheaper then the sealant designed for such, if I had to choose and pay just a few more dollars extra for the sealant...well I would simply due to it's nature being less messy and it is water based so would be easier cleanup.

I would probably Private Message one of the other guys in the neighborhood that had a little more experience in this matter than myself.

Plus I can only imagine what my wife would say when entering the house somewhat covered in TAR....I laugh now just simply thinking about it...:rotflm:
 

JackLeg

New User
Reggie
I think I may be being "tarred" for my comment about roof cement. Rubber roof cement is NOT tar! I only suggested it because Anchor Seal and Baily's are not readily available locally. :nah:

AND, because VT suggested it if you can't find anything else. It's definitely better than paint.

If I was sawmilling, I'd square up the ends of my customers logs and then saw it. I realize this is another step in the process, maybe, but I guess Ivey and my local guy have spoiled me.

My $.02 worth.

:gar-Bi
 
J

jeff...

Has anyone ever had success in using tar/rubber & then cutting the ends off just before going through the sawmill?
Still going to get all over everything it touches. I'll do whatever I customer asks within reason - they are paying the bill. But like I said it's a mess to try and clean up and seems to get into the strangest places... IMHO roofing cement belongs on the roof, log end sealer belongs on the end of logs.

Thanks
 

scsmith42

New User
Scott Smith
Dennis, re applying tar and then removing it for sawing, I would think that you'd need to turn around and re-apply some type of end sealer after milling for the remainder of the drying process. If I get logs in that have already started checking, I'll take a chainsaw and clean up the ends, seal them, and then mill them.

If you can apply a proper end sealer immediately after logging, it will see you all the way through the drying process - whether it's KD or AD.

It's also a lot easier to end seal a log than all of the boards that come from the log.

Some folks have experimented with latex paint - would be better than nothing.

Scott
 

Mike Wilkins

Mike
Senior User
There is a guy outside of Greenville that has a Woodmizer portable mill. I have purchased lumber from him in the past. He usually has lots of Cypress, Pine, Oak, Cedar, Walnut in stock. Sometimes Cherry and Maple will be in stock, depending on what is available. And also some super-hard Jatoba; pretty wood but hard as anything exotic.
252-746-3600 or 215-0424
 
M

McRabbet

Update from the sawmill guy outside of Greenville.
His name is John Baker and his # is 252-746-6807.
Hope this helps.
Michael,

I suggest that you add his name to the NC Sawyers listing. Go to the "Where Are" drop-down on the Upper Menu Bar and click on NC Sawyers. Scroll all the way to the bottom of the listing and click on "Edit this Page". You can edit the file and make the addition in the appropriate region, based on the map at the top. Be sure to include all of the necessary info so others can find him. And thanks!
 
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