How many board feet?

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mxracer

New User
Dan
Ok, so the LOML now wants a country hutch. She found one she likes in Fine Woodworking magazine.

She mentioned she'd like it in mahogany, so... I'd like to be pretty close board feet if I do it in a wood I have to buy.

Would also take suggestions on other species that would look good. I think the pic below is cherry???

So would any of you guys have an idea of how many board feet of wood it might take for this:

http://store.taunton.com/onlinestore/item/country-hutch-011224.html

Or if anyone has bought plans from these guys before can anyone tell me if that type of info will be int he plans?

Sorry if these questions seem stupid, I admit up front that I'm new to wood working :embaresse and this would be my second "real" project. I like a challenge :wsmile:
Thanks in advance for any advice.
 

striker

Stephen
Corporate Member
I bought the Baltimore card table (Steve Latta) prints from FWW. Plans were drawn in CAD and had quite a bit of detail and dimensioning. I did find a drawing error in the first 5 minutes of looking them over which just leaves one wondering what else is going to be found the hard way. I have bought plans from a number of sources and I think their plans were comparatively very good.

Good luck

Stephen
 

skysharks

New User
John Macmaster
Dan, it's kind of hard and near impossible to tell you how may board feet that plan is going to use, unless you have the plans in your hand.
Most plans will give you a material list, some make annotations for the bd ft requirements, some don't.
 

scsmith42

New User
Scott Smith
Would also take suggestions on other species that would look good. I think the pic below is cherry???


Personally, I think that it would look GREAT in quartersawn oak... but I'll admit that I have a slight bias..... :rotflm:

It's a really nice looking hutch. I don't think that I would lean much towards mahogany, as that is not a wood that's usually associated with a "country" type of styling. Oak, cherry, hickory, and perhaps maple are all woods that come to mind for me.

A mahogony hutch would look outstanding - don't get me wrong, it's just not what I would consider to be "country" style.

If you go with those plans, they should include a material list, as Mac indicated.

Scott
 

bwat

New User
Bill
Ditto to Scott's comments. If you want the classic "country" style reproduction stay with his recommended domestics. If you want the mahogany look, sapele will come close and is readily available from our members and retail sponsors at a much lesser price than mahogany. Nice piece in any species.
 

PChristy

New User
Phillip
Dan, if I was going to build this I would go with Cherry - As Scott stated Cherry will give a more country glo and I really like Cherry - Mahogany in my opinion is to dark for that country feeling
 

mxracer

New User
Dan
Thanks guys. Seems the consensus is cherry. Makes sense to me for all the reasons stated. Don't think it will be a hard sell for the wife. :wsmile:

I'm going to call Taunton today and ask about the plans.

I realize this will be a BIG challenge for me, but that is really what I want. And I'm sure if I get in trouble I could call in a friend or two that have been building furniture for years.

Or maybe if I get stuck I'll just leave it until the "North Charlotte" shop crawl and it can be a community build. :rotflm:
Thanks again, and any other suggestions are again welcome.

Dan
 

rbdoby

New User
Rick
Dan,

I logged on to the FWW site but could not find any info on the # of board feet needed for the hutch you want. Guess they want to sell the plans. I also agree with Scott and would stick with domestic lumber like oak or cherry. I think it would look good in Southern Yellow Pine with orange shellac to give it that aged look.

Rick Doby
 

mxracer

New User
Dan
Ok, follow up question. Is the online sub to FWW worth it? I found the article but have to subscribe to read it. Watched the vids is all I could do.

Hmmm.. yellow pine. If I can convince the wife of that I have TONS of that from the mill. = 0 cost and as many "tries" as I need :gar-Bi

Thanks
Dan
 

striker

Stephen
Corporate Member
Online FWW subscription worth it? tough question - I guess it depends how much you want to use it. Most of it is a rehash of whats in the magazine but it is handy at times to search for different topics, blog, see reviews, etc. Be prepared though, for your "convenience" they automatically re-up your subscription and tell you about about 3 minutes before doing so.
 

DaveD

New User
Dave
You can probably do a decent guess just by the dimensions of the overall cabinet size,

My guess is 68 bd feet & another 20% for waste. That also assumes you selectively buy boards that you can get decent pieces out of rather than just blindly buying 'x' sq ft of lumber sight unseen.

If the sides are raised panel construction then you could use plywood inserts and decrease the guess by about 18 sq ft or so. Subtract another 4 to 6 sq ft if you want plywood for the inserts on the door raised panels. Then add in the cost of a sheet of mahogany veneered plywood.

That doesn't include the beadboard back, drawer sides/bottom or the very bottom/top surfaces of the cabinet.

Anybody else care to guess?
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
If you go with pine (which I think would look spectacular), you want SYP (southern yellow pine), not SPF. To get SYP, you will probably have to go with 2 x 8 wide minimum at the borg or local builders supply. Do not think you can get 2 3/4" boards out of a 2 x thickness. After cleaning up the 2 x lumber, you will end up around 1 1/8" after the twist and bow is removed. However, this will yield a couple 1/2 - 3/8 " boards for panels,

With that in mind when you go to purchase:

#2 pine will be the most readily available. Many will have bad edges and half will have the pith running down the center. So, first figure out how many you need for panels/drawer fronts, moldings, and then how many needed for stiles/rails and support structure.

For the panels/ drawer fronts/and moldings, you want flat-sawn for best figure. These will be the ones with the growth rings as close as parallel to the width of the board. The will also be the ones with most twist/cupping, loosest knots and worst edges. For a 8" stock board, figure 5 1/2 usable width and 1 1/4" thickness after flattening/straightening (providing finished length will not be over 3', Over 3' drop thickness to 1 1/8").

For the stiles and rails, pick the boards with the heart almost center in the wood and the growth rings vertical on each side. For all practical purposes, pith on a SYP board is almost as good as the rest. Figure 6" usable width and 1 1/8" thick. These may have some warp (sideways bow across the width) and cup. (If going hard wood, remember that you need to make a pith and sapwood allowance, however the warpage will be less. You can still probably figure 30% loss).


I usually make a cut list first, that tells me how many boards I need at what thickness/width/length, and then lay them out with pencil on the long boards, adding 1/4" for a rip cut and 1/2 - 1" extra on the length. I then cross-cut leaving things like stiles, rails, drawer supports, backs sides, together to get at least a 24" length. I then initially remove twist, flatten and plane and let dry. (I make a paper copy of what's what and just write on the boards what pieces each length includes.) After drying, I then move on to making the finished boards.

You can go exactly by the plans or adjust as you go. If all my boards clean up and are square and flat at 1 1/4" thick, I will probably end up with 1 1/4" rails and stiles for the carcass. Just remember to decide a "show" face for each board, and make all your reference measurements from that face.

Go

PS: If it is your first complicated project, make one out of pine. If its good enough, you win. If its trash, you didn.t spend much and learned a lot. If its good enough but wife wants it out of different wood, give it to family or charity and be a hero. After making it, tho, make sure you clean all the pitch off your blades 'cause pine can add a lot of resin to those cutting surfaces. If Dave's estimate is correct, then $40 worth of lumber will get the frame and drawers built.
 
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