Holly Tree Stock (Raleigh)

Johnson

AD
Senior User
Good Morning,

My wife informed me yesterday that the three 30'-40' Holly trees that are on our property need to be removed to make room for her future gardening plans. The bases of the trunks are around 12" in diameter. I will be taking these trees out myself. I understand that the wood from Holly trees is sought after by wood turners (which I do not currently partake in). My research has led me to understand that the wood needs to be kiln dried in short order after removal to preserve the color.

Does anyone have a desire to take the wood for kiln drying?

I haven't decided yet if I am going to try to sell the wood or just give it away. If this is worthwhile, I will sell it cheap to whomever can put it to use. I hate the idea of throwing away wood that could be used by someone for something.

From your collective experience, is this worth trying to do or should I just throw everything into the woods?
 

CrealBilly

Jeff
Senior User
Good Morning,

My wife informed me yesterday that the three 30'-40' Holly trees that are on our property need to be removed to make room for her future gardening plans. The bases of the trunks are around 12" in diameter. I will be taking these trees out myself. I understand that the wood from Holly trees is sought after by wood turners (which I do not currently partake in). My research has led me to understand that the wood needs to be kiln dried in short order after removal to preserve the color.

Does anyone have a desire to take the wood for kiln drying?

I haven't decided yet if I am going to try to sell the wood or just give it away. If this is worthwhile, I will sell it cheap to whomever can put it to use. I hate the idea of throwing away wood that could be used by someone for something.

From your collective experience, is this worth trying to do or should I just throw everything into the woods?
Chances of maintaining the white color are best when the tree is cut in the evening and processed (sawn and kilned) asap. If sunlight hits the lumber before it's kiln dried your chances are drastically reduced.
 
Last edited:

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
I still have a chunk of holly (in my freezer) awaiting the days that I will get to turn more often.
It is also highly valued for inlay/stringing if I recall correctly. Keeping it white is important there as well.
 

creasman

Jim
User
I've heard/read it is best to cut the trees in the winter when the sap is down. This increases the chance of getting white wood. I use holly for inlay/stringing and would be interested in a 3'-4' section. I live in Apex (south Cary) and could help take them down if you'd like some help. PM if interested.
 

Johnson

AD
Senior User
Good Morning,

Unfortunately, I could not wait for winter and the trees are down. Jim Creasman came and got some, but I have a pile left that needs a good home to anyone that wants it.

Much like a litter of puppies, the wood is FREE to a good home.

I believe that Jim was able to QS some of what he took and got some sizeable stock from it.

If you are interested, send me a PM and I will send you my address. I will end up having to toss whatever is not taken in a few weeks/whenever my wife makes a decision about which flowering bushes she wants me to plant. I will be flush cutting the stumps next week and there are a few interesting crotches that will be available for those of you who are of the wood turning persuasion.
 

creasman

Jim
User
I recommend anyone local interested in milling some holly to take Alex up on his offer. It's from several large ornamental holly's (not American Holly). I milled one 30" section of the trunk into a couple of 1" boards about 4"-5" wide. The wood is smooth grained and very light -- not a lot of heart wood. I plan to mill the rest this weekend, stick it and paint the ends before stacking it in a dark corner of my basement where there is AC. We'll see how it goes after drying for a few months.
 

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